Opportunities


MCAT Information

Applicant/admission information based on 2006 national data from the Association of American Medical Colleges:

  • National mean for MCAT scores of accepted students were: Verbal (9.5), Physical Science (9.3), Writing (O), Biological Sciences (9.9).
  • National mean for GPA’s of accepted students were: GPA Science (3.50) and GPA Non-Science (3.73).
  • Number of applicants with Iowa as legal residence: 341: number matriculating with Iowa as a legal residence:  137  (40%)
  • Total enrollment by school: University of Iowa (573), Creighton (498), and University of Minnesota Twin Cities (736).

Association of American Medical Colleges Home Page. October 27, 2006. Association of American Medical Colleges. Accessed:  October 24, 2007 .

Drake CPHS Applicants to Medical Schools
(Pharmaceutical Sciences Major)

Year

# Applying

# Accepted

% Accepted

2001

1

1 (University of Iowa)

100%

2002

1

1 (University of Iowa)

100%

2003

0

0

 

2004

1

1 (Emory)

100%

2005

0

0

 

2006

1

1 (SUNY Stony Brook)

100%

2007

0

0

 


Based on 2006 national data for medical schools, here is a sample of majors and their acceptance rates.

Major

Applied

(% of Total)

Accepted

(% of Total)

% Accepted

Biological Sciences

21,603

55%

9,439

54%

43.7%

Humanities

1411

4%

750

4%

53%

Math & Statistics

272

<1%

130

<1%

48%

Physical Sciences

4,671

12%

2,382

14%

51%

Social Sciences

4,319

11%

1,960

11%

45.3%

Specialized Health Sciences

1,091

3%

376

2%

34.4%

Other

5,741

15%

2,387

14%

41.6%

*Chiropractic, Dentistry, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Pharmacy

INFORMATION ON MCAT
For all current information on MCAT please see MCAT Student Manual, http://www.aamc.org/start.htm 

Verbal Reasoning

  • Multiple-choice questions based on reading selections from the social and natural sciences and the humanities
  • Assess ability to comprehend, reason, and think critically
  • Subject-matter knowledge in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences will not be tested

Writing Sample

  • Brief topic statement
  • Set of writing tasks designed to elicit a unified, coherent, first-draft essay exploring the meaning and implications of the statement

Physical and Biological Sciences Sections

  • Multiple-choice questions accompanied with brief informational passages; a smaller number are independent of any passage and of each other
  • Assess knowledge of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, and physics through their application to the solution of science problems
  • Don’t know the answer, rule out the answers that you know are incorrect and make an educated guess at the right answers
  • Never leave blanks


PREPARING FOR THE MCAT
Success on admissions tests depends upon good reading skills.  In most professional school studies, you will be expected to read and comprehend as much as, if not more than, you did during undergraduate school.  You will not have the time to re-read material.  After graduation from professional school, you may not need to read as much information as before and you will need to stay current on many aspects of medicine, drugs, governmental regulations, insurance or health care maintenance organizations.  These resources provide the types of material used in the MCAT.  You will gain exposure to the language and current ethical and controversial issues.

THE PERSONAL STATEMENT
Your personal statement provides you with the opportunity to distinguish yourself from all the other highly qualified people and is of major importance.  Most secondary applications offer an opportunity for an additional statement.  Secondary applications are sent to you directly from the schools and most require a fee.  A good Statement of Purpose is a very important part of the application since it gives the school admissions committee the best opportunity to evaluate the full range of the experience and knowledge you bring in your pursuit of a professional degree and the appropriateness of their school to your objectives.  The Statement of Purpose should be a concise, well-written essay covering three distinct areas relating to you: Open with a summary statement of your preparedness, then describe your background, education, and community—and the reasons you became interested in the health profession of your choice.  Briefly discuss your academic preparation (including lab or research), relevant work, and other experiences, i.e., volunteer work.  Make sure to tell the reader what you gained from these experiences – what qualities you have developed.  For a secondary or specific application, discuss how the school will help you meet your educational and career goal.  State your skills, your strengths, and your uniqueness.  Be positive and not apologetic.  However, explain any significant lapses in your academic record.  Make sure the final copy is proofread for errors.


DO’S & DON’TS ON THE PERSONAL STATEMENT

Do’s:

  • Keep a journal of your work and volunteer experience
  • Get an early start
  • Be honest, consistent and straightforward
  • Be specific, not general
  • Be comfortable with the image you’re presenting
  • Pay attention to detail, must be neat – absolutely no spelling or grammatical errors
  • Have someone proof read your statement, be careful of multiple opinions
  • Include, when appropriate (if requested by the directions on the application)
    • A summary of your accomplishments first
    • Background information – people and events that influenced your decision
    • Learning experience(s) that serve as a foundation for your choice of career
    • Where you picked up first-hand information/experience about the field
    • Your own appraisal of yourself (strengths, weaknesses, uniqueness)
    • Leadership role activities
    • Career objectives and goals
  • Let your personality come through, be interesting and unique. Give insight on your hopes, goals, motivations and dedication.  Avoid copying any others.
  • Do not be afraid to let your passion and commitment to a health career come through 
  • Take the opportunity to explain anything you feel might raise questions (e.g., a weak academic quarter). Explain what was going on in your life, if a personal or academic issue affected you.
  • Make the essay look good so that it’s easier and more enjoyable to read.  Follow the guidelines for length, margins, and do not use a small font.
  • Keep a photocopy of each essay and every single piece of your application. 
  • Reference your materials before you go to an interview and as documentation in case someone loses or misplaces your application.  You do not want to recreate anything.  Keep paper copies in addition to disc copies.
  • Read your essay before an interview and make sure you know what you wrote
  • Be prepared to discuss and defend essay points during the interview

Don’ts:

  • Don’t underestimate the importance of the essay (a very common mistake)
  • Don’t underestimate the length of time it will take to write your statement
  • Don’t have someone else write it for you!  There are ethical issues involved here, but you are also the best spokesperson for yourself.
  • Don’t list everything you have ever done.  There is usually a place on the application to list your activities.  Avoid giving unnecessary details. 
  • Don’t mention your interest for one particular school in a general application that is being sent to many schools
  • Don’t discuss or compare your self to the application standards or other students

*Adapted from Health Career Resource Office, MCD biology department, University of California, Santa Cruz

 

 

 

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CPHS Upcoming Events
Doctor of Pharmacy Hooding Ceremony
Saturday, May 17 @ 4 p.m.
[Knapp Center]
Undergraduate Commencement [B.S., Health Sciences]
Sunday, May 18 @ 10 a.m.
[Knapp Center]
Graduate and Doctoral Commencement [PharmD]
Sunday, May 18 @ 2:00 p.m.
[Knapp Center]
CPHS News
April 1, 2014
Global and National Public Health Week at Drake University will begin Wednesday, April 2, and continues Monday, April 7 and Wednesday, April 9. Five events will be held throughout the week—all of which are free and open to the public.
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