Main Content

First Year Seminars

FYS 001 (crn 2931) - Writing and Therapy

FYS 002 (crn 3212 + 3385) – “Coming of Age in the Cinema”

FYS 005 (crn 3203) – The Future

FYS 006 (crn 1758) The Future

FYS 007 (crn 1129) - Creative Writing: Adaptation 

FYS 008 (crn 3050) - Lost! (and Found)

FYS 009 (crn5851) - Slave Narratives: Past and Present

FYS 010 (crn 1133) – Encountering Nonhuman Minds

FYS 011 (crn 1733) - The Hipster: A Cultural History of Cool

FYS 012 (crn 5456) - The Writing of Etiquette/The Etiquette of Writing

FYS 013 (crn 4147 + 4151) - South African Literature and Culture

FYS 015 (crn 4480) – Technology at Drake: What is it?  How do I use it?

FYS 016 (crn 3365 + 5136) – The Power of Tradition, the Forces of Change

FYS 017 (crn 5188) - From Lysistrata to Laramie: 2500 Years of Theatre as a Force of Social Change

FYS 018 (crn 3707) - Queer Voices

FYS 019 (crn 3681) - A Better World: Is there an App for that?

FYS 020 (crn 1833) – Good News, Bad News

FYS 021 (crn 5025) – The Puzzle of Geologic Time

FYS 022 (crn 3303) - Drakepedia: Building a Living Archive

FYS 023 (crn 4098) - Diversity is for Everyone

FYS 024 (crn 4099) - Political Scandals

FYS 025 (crn 1163+4193 OR crn 1166+4192) - Perspectives on American Character and Society
(Learning Community)

FYS 026 (crn 2929) - Political Scandals

FYS 027 (crn 3437) – Physics for Future Presidents

FYS 028 (crn 3006) – Seeing -- Believing

FYS 029 (crn 4509) - Running: Body, Mind, Sole

FYS 030 (crn 5182) - Technology for Mathematics

FYS 031 (crn 3214) - Connecting the Dots for a Socially Just World

FYS 032 (crn 5066) - Manifestos

FYS 033 (crn 3308) – Money Matters: Financial Literacy Skills for College Students

FYS 034 (crn 3201) - Food History/Local to Global

FYS 035 (crn 5176) - The Liberal Agenda

FYS 036 (crn 3663) - The Meaning of Punk

FYS 037 (crn 2193) - "All Rivers Run to the Sea...But the Sea is Never Full"

FYS 038 (crn 1916) - Exploring the Portrayal of Mental Illness and Intellectual Disabilities in the Media

FYS 039 (crn 2941) - Women in the Bible: Mates, Mothers, Murders, and More

FYS 041 (crn 5490) - China's Economic Future & its Effect on the World

FYS 042 (crn 1670) - Digital Learning, Digital People

FYS 043 (crn 3209) - Creating a Culture of Wellness

FYS 044 (crn 1744) - Perceptions of Illness: How We View the Sick

FYS 045 (crn 5491) - Authentic Leadership

FYS 046 (crn 3213) - Generosity of the Heart

FYS 047 (crn 3691) - Making the Most of College

FYS 048 (crn 4096) - Daring to Dream: the Stories of Business

FYS 049 (crn 1362) - Daring to Dream: The Stories of Business

FYS 050 (crn 5752) - American Identity and the Rhetorical Landscape

FYS 051 (crn 5799 ) - Got Spirituality?

 


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FYS 001 / CRN 2931
 
WRITING AND THERAPY

TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Nancy Reincke

This course examines the ways in which writing can be therapeutic and the most effective methods for writing therapeutically.  This focus allows us to explore different functions and facets of writing; it also allows us to read about and discuss a variety of human experiences, specifically the ways in which different people make sense of illnesses from catastrophic trauma (such as war) to chronic dysfunction (such as manic depression or obsessive compulsive disorder).  Reading, writing and discussion are all thoroughly integrated in the course. 

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FYS 002 / CRN 3212

COMING OF AGE IN THE CINEMA
MW  12:30-1:45 pm and U 4:30-6:45 pm (Sunday early evening viewing lab - crn 3385)
Professor Dina Smith

This FYS will focus on bildungsroman tradition, a particular form of the novel that focuses on the moral and psychological development of a character from childhood to adulthood, and thus engages with historical and political encounters such characters face as they "come of age."  As such, these tales offer entry points into the social and political tensions that define what it means to be a child and an adult in each area.  Of course, narrative cinema has adapted the form: we have the early, wholesome 1930s Andy Hardy movies, a series that followed young Andy, who lived in an idealized family and small town (no Depression allowed), into adulthood; the 1950s juvenile delinquent movies, such as REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE, THE WILD ONE, and THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE, that celebrated, even as they feared, the rise of a vibrant teenager consumer culture that helped catalyze the 1950's U.S. economy and culture.  During the 1960s-70s, with the collapse of the Hollywood studio-system against the chaotic backdrop of Vietnam, the form starts to look back, in a kind of broken nostalgia, as it negotiates and unknown future, in films such as THE GRADUATE, THE LAST PICTURE SHOW, and AMERICAN GRAFFITI.  The last section of the course will focus on the 1980s-present: from the suburban angst films directed by John Hughes to Amy Heckerling's brilliant feminist adaptation of the mall-teen genre in FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH; from films that explicitly foreground class and race (GEORGE WASHINGTON and HALF NELSON) to the contemporary teen "bromance" that emerges against the backdrop of a 21st-century America defined by continuous war.  As with all FYS courses, this class will focus on critical analysis and thinking skills: through 1) dynamic in-class discussion in which each student must participate 2) close critical reading of films and supplemental texts and 3) through writing argumentative papers (three papers in total, each of which will be composed through continuous drafting, that will be 5-7 pages in length).  This course will treat films as serious texts as lenses into 20th and 21st-century U.S. history and politics.


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FYS 005 / CRN 3203

THE FUTURE

MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Sarah Hogan

For many of us, a reference to "the future" immediately conjures up visions of robots, spaceships, flying cars or conveyor-belt sidewalks -- the stuff of classic sci-fi imagery.  Some probably tend less toward this high-tech future, and instead imagine a dystopian society or the desolate, post-apocalyptic landscapes of films like The Road or I Am Legend.  But what if we were to treat the future in slightly more realistic, global terms, focusing especially on probable near-future scenarios in order to help us prepare for the contours and crises of the next half-century?  Throughout the semester, this will be our task we we read a number of essays and book excerpts by authors who analyze contemporary cultural, economic, environmental, and technological trends (sometimes through the lens of fiction) but then use this knowledge of the present in order to make rationally-based predictions about the problems and opportunities our world is likely to face in the coming decades.  We'll review recent debates about global poverty and inequality and the impending energy, food financial and climates crises, while also examining some of the potential solutions that have been proposed for these problems.  We will also consider the representation of the future in two recent films, Avatar and Children of Men.  Our questions about he future will inspire us to speculate, debate, and mainly, write, while learning how to evaluate ideas knowledgeably and critically.  Obviously, the future is an unstable, unreliable object of study; but forces in play right now are so massive and present humanity with so many dangers an opportunities that it behooves us, both as individuals and as a species, to imagine better future and think clearly about the tasks ahead.


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FYS 006 / CRN 1758

THE FUTURE
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Sarah Hogan

For many of us, a reference to "the future" immediately conjures up visions of robots, spaceships, flying cars or conveyor-belt sidewalks -- the stuff of classic sci-fi imagery.  Some probably tend less toward this high-tech future, and instead imagine a dystopian society or the desolate, post-apocalyptic landscapes of films like The Road or I Am Legend.  But what if we were to treat the future in slightly more realistic, global terms, focusing especially on probable near-future scenarios in order to help us prepare for the contours and crises of the next half-century?  Throughout the semester, this will be our task we we read a number of essays and book excerpts by authors who analyze contemporary cultural, economic, environmental, and technological trends (sometimes through the lens of fiction) but then use this knowledge of the present in order to make rationally-based predictions about the problems and opportunities our world is likely to face in the coming decades.  We'll review recent debates about global poverty and inequality and the impending energy, food financial and climates crises, while also examining some of the potential solutions that have been proposed for these problems.  We will also consider the representation of the future in two recent films, Avatar and Children of Men.  Our questions about he future will inspire us to speculate, debate, and mainly, write, while learning how to evaluate ideas knowledgeably and critically.  Obviously, the future is an unstable, unreliable object of study; but forces in play right now are so massive and present humanity with so many dangers an opportunities that it behooves us, both as individuals and as a species, to imagine better future and think clearly about the tasks ahead.

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FYS 007 / CRN 1129

CREATIVE WRITING: ADAPTATION

TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Amy Letter

We will imagine our way to better understandings of existing stories and characters by re-positioning them in new genres and media: we might write the diary of a character who currently exists only in a movie; we might write a short story from the point of view of a minor character from one of Shakespeare's plays; we might write a screen or stage play starring characters who have only appeared in songs.

We will examine how creative people have struggled with the idea and task of adaptation (and the related task of translation) in the past, and how the act of adapting can both illuminate and obfuscate (and possibly obliterate) the original subject.  We will look at Charlie Kaufman's film Adaptation, a performance of The Compleat Wrks of Wllm Shkspr (Abridged), and compare short selections from several adaptations to see how work has moved from graphic novel to film, from television to short story, from concept album to stage play, etc.

We will also use adaptation to examine genre and media itself: what are the strengths (and weaknesses) of the different forms?  What can a short story do that a film can't?  What can a poem do that a play can't?  What choices are we making when we choose a form?  How do we re-see characters and situations when re re-imagine them in different forms?

Students will have the opportunity to locate material in the literary and media world(s) and bring in sources of their own choosing -- for example, students will be asked to find a current narrative-based television commercial and re-imagine it as a short story or poem, etc. -- and will be encouraged to use their other talents and awareness of other media formats to expand the scope of the class.

Writing for this course will be made up of a combination of creative work (in multiple forms) and analysis (both of other students' work and of the ideas and works of published authors).


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FYS 008 / CRN 3050

LOST! (AND FOUND)

MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Lisa West

This Seminar will build off of the phenomenal success of the TV show Lost!  We will discuss clips of the show but most of the reading will be on related issues of what it means in today’s culture and in the past to be “lost,” either physically, spiritually or psychologically.  We will also use the concept of “lost” to start thinking about interdisciplinary knowledge.  We will spend some time with maps and orienteering equipment, we will think about “lost” as a concept, and we will look at art that celebrates finding things, or making discoveries.  We will also read about famous instances of being lost in American history, such as the Roanoke Island mystery and early Spanish explorations.  You can expect a variety of ways to think about being lost (and found) and both creative and critical writing assignments.


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FYS 009/CRN 5851

SLAVE NARRATIVES: PAST AND PRESENT

MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Jonterri Gadson

In this course, students will explore how the institution of slavery transformed and shaped American consciousness.  The narratives of enslaved Africans will serve as a foundation for our exploration of contemporary slavers  -- sex trafficking, debt bondage, forced labor -- on a global scale.  Through readings, writing assignments, films and exercises, students will investigate slavery's effects on family dynamics, economics/socio-economics, education, and identity.

Readings may include enslaved African narratives such as: Narrative of the Life of Henry Box Brown, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, and Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.  We will investigate various contemporary forms of slavery in readings such as Modern Slavery: The Secret World of 27 Million People.  Fiction readings may include Toni Morrison's Beloved as well as a screening of the film.

 

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FYS 010 / CRN 1133

ENCOUNTERING NONHUMAN MINDS 

TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Jeff Karnicky

Can birds think? Do dogs have emotions? Do plants have a mind? Is the earth itself alive? This seminar will focus on answering these questions, and others, as we explore the world of nonhuman consciousness and intelligence. Starting with Thomas Nagel’s famous question “What is it like to be a bat?”,  we will investigate, through reading and writing, the multiple ways that minds can be understood. We will read essays and fiction. Students are expected to participate in class discussion, and to complete a number of writing assignments over the course of the semester.

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FYS 011 / CRN 1733


THE HIPSTER: A CULTURAL HISTORY OF COOL
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Matt Garite

Once a curious breed of fashion-conscious twenty somethings living the bohemian dream in urban enclaves like Williamsburg, Brooklyn and the Lower East Side of Manhattan, hipsters have today become a global force to be reckoned with.  Most of us are familiar at this point with the basic hipster style of dress: skinny jeans, V-neck tees, oversized cinch belts, trucker hats, ironic mustaches, thick-rimmed glasses, keffiyehs work as scarves, etc.  As the movement winds it way from the margins to the mainstream courtesy of companies like Urban Outfitters and tastemaker websites like Pitchfork.com, analysts of popular culture have been quick to take note, with charged responses appearing from amateurs and professionals alike.  Some critics view today's hipsters as a unique source of cultural vibrancy in an era otherwise defined by blandness and austerity; others dismiss them as smug children of privilege and the zombie offspring of every major youth subculture since the 1950s.  This course will give us an opportunity to read some of these analyses of contemporary hipster culture, as we listen to the music and study the styles in order to decide for ourselves.  Early in the semester, we'll read works of cultural history examining the origins of the concept of "cool," thus enabling us to situate today's hipsters in relation to important twentieth century precursors like the beats and the hippies, and movements like punk and hip-hop.  Along the way, we'll be sure to discuss the race, class, and gender politics of hipster culture.  We'll also read bout theories of "cultural capital," and consider the often vexed historical relationship between youth subcultures and the markets.  Writing and research will be key components of the course.

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FYS012 / CRN 5456

THE WRITING OF ETIQUETTE/THE ETIQUETTE OF WRITING
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Craig Owens

In this course, we will investigate the relationship between writing, as a social practice, and etiquette, as a code of social behavior.  Since both are systems by which we communicate with others, we will ask what these systems share in common, how their respective "rules" and "expectations" are learned and enforced, and what the consequences are foe those who choose not to adhere to them.  Throughout the course, students will engage in daily reading and writing assignments, class discussion about the issues raised, and a final group project on first-year etiquette at Drake.  Students in this course will also be introduced to the research resources of Cowles Library.  This course fulfills credit requirements toward the English and Writing majors.

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FYS013 / CRN 4147


SOUTH AFRICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

TR 12:30-1:45 pm and U 7:00-9:30 (Sunday evening viewing lab - crn 4151)
Professor Melisa Klimaszewski

This course introduces students to college-level critical reading, writing, and inquiry through an intensive study of South African literature and culture.  Studying texts in several genres -- primarily the novel, but also film, biography, short story, and poetry -- students will consider the ways in which writers use various textual forms to capture, represent, and comment upon the complexities of South African life and culture.  In addition to learning about the not-so-distant historical events that occurred during the apartheid era, students will study the state of South Africa during the dismantling of apartheid and its present-day struggles.  The writers we study will help us to examine the long-term effects of apartheid on race relations and economic inequity, for instance.  We will also consider how the literature of this nation raises and addresses broader questions of what it means to form human identity, the troublesome propensity of human beings to oppress and inflict suffering on others, and the sometimes surprising methods in which suffering people survive assaults on their bodies as well as their imaginations.

Readings may include: Steven Biko's I Write What I Like: Selected Writings, J.M. Coetee's Disgrace, Bessie Head's When Rain Clouds Gather, Nelson Mandela's The Long Walk to Freedom, Zake Mda's Ways of Dying, Njabulo Ndebele's The Cry of Winnie Mandela, Alan Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country, Mamphela Ramphele's Across Boundaries, and Zoe Wicomb's You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town.

Students will learn to strengthen their writing skills by paying close attention to the ways in which others write. In this way, critical reading will strengthen each student's ability to think as well as to write clearly and critically. Critical thinking can take many forms; in this course, it will mean that we practice asking incisive questions, identifying underlying assumptions that affect the way we process information, looking past the obvious, and developing insightful claims.

In the summer of 2012, Professor Klimaszewski will be leading a three-week travel seminar to South Africa (for 6 academic credits).  Entering first-year students who may be interested in enrolling in that travel seminar would benefit from considering this first year seminar.


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FYS 015 / CRN 4480

TECHNOLOGY AT DRAKE: WHAT IS IT? WHERE IS IT? HOW DO I USE IT?
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Jean Hansen

Most students arrive on campus with a working knowledge of their own computer and software as well as a number of Web 2.0 tools available on the Internet.  However, how many of you know about he technology and resources available on the Drake campus?  do you know where to go for help with your password or the Drake network?  Do you know how to use the BlueView portal effectively to handle both the business and the social sides of your life as a Drake student?  Do you know about he huge array of resources available for your use form Cowles Library?  Do you know how to be an effective online student and how to use Drake's LMS?  Are you familiar with netiquette and how to write an effective blog entry or work collaboratively in a wiki?  Are you comfortable with the transition from texting and tweeting to writing college level papers?  This class will provide insights and information to make you an effective user of the various kinds of technology available to you as a student at Drake.

The Technology at Drake course will introduce you to the may facets of technology on the Drake campus through field trips to various offices and buildings, guest lecturers who will enlighten you about the most effective methods for using these resources, exposure to and practice with a wide variety of resources, both on and offline, discussions and explorations with your peers based around this technology, and papers and projects that provide you with an opportunity to apply your new learning.  Through your work in this class, your writing will evolve from texts and tweets to papers that will be positively received by your college professors.  At the end of this class, you will have an understanding of the bet Drake has to offer in technological resources, which you will be able to sue to your advantage for the rest of your Drake career.

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FYS 016 / CRN 3365 + 5136


THE POWER OF TRADITION: THE FORCES OF CHANGE: CHINA (1587) AND ENGLAND (1529)

MW   12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Elizabeth Robertson

This course examines two different cultures, China in 1587 and England in 1529, at points of crisis in leadership and compares their ideas and debates on how to preserve unity, national identity and authority, and yet accommodate changing views of social, economic an religious justice.  What are the sources of power of those who govern the society, and what constraints exist on that power?  How re the demands of the community (political, religious, or class) balanced with a growing sense of individual liberty?  What tensions exist because of differences in wealth and status and attitudes towards economic inequality?  Students will explore these questions nd attempt to articulate some tentative conclusions about how traditional structures of authority are or are not to be maintained in the face of challenges from new ideas.  Class is conducted not through lecture or discussion but through an elaborate role-playing pedagogy know as "Reacting to the Past."  "Reacting to the Past" seeks to introduce students to major ideas and texts by replicating the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance.  Students read classic texts, set in particular moments of intellectual and social foment, which inform the roles they are assigned.  Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wanli Emperor introduces students to the suppleness and power of Confucian thought.  The game unfolds amidst the secrecy and intrigue within the Forbidden City, as scholars struggle to apply Confucian precepts to a dynasty in peril.  Henry VII and the Reformation Parliament takes up the King's "great matter" (his desire to divorce Catherine of Aragon) during the tumultuous years 1529-1536 when Thomas More has just been named Lord Chancellor after the dismissal of Cardinal Wolsey, and Thomas Cromwell conspires to lead the king's party to his own ends.  Four ideas/issues clash and contend for dominance: medieval Catholicism, Lutheranism, Renaissance Humanism, and Machiavellian statecraft.  Students will read works representative of all traditions.


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FYS 017 / CRN 5188

FROM LYSISTRATA TO LARAMIE: 2500 YEARS OF THEATRE AS A FORCE OF SOCIAL CHANGE
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor John Graham

Through the lens of the theatre we will be exploring different social and political movements throughout history.  We will look at the scope and effectiveness of theatre as a force for social change, and examine the contexts in which it succeeds or fails.  Using play scripts, essays, recorded performance, and historical source documents we will examine the practices of playwrights and producers and how they subvert or support the dominant paradigms of their time.  This is a writing-intensive class that will ask you to write both critically and creatively, and to mount a performance of your own socially-relevant 10 minute play.?

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FYS 018 / CRN 3707

QUEER VOICES
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Lori Blachford

This course explores the representations of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender/transsexuals (LGBT) in the media -- from books, TV shows and movies to magazines, music and more.

We'll talk about: 

  •  how the representation of LGBT characters and issues has changed over the years years, especially recently.  (Hello, "Glee" and "Modern Family")
  • motivations behind the messages.  (Before Katy Perry sang "I Kissed a Girl," Jill Sobule had a song with the same title but a very different message.)
  • the use of stereotypes and how they shape perceptions and impact change.

And we'll talk with members of the LGBT community about whether they feel the media accurately represents their lives.

Through a series of writing assignments, including critiques of some of the media we study, students will become more engaged consumers of information and give voice to their own perspectives on the media.  Although we will focus on LGBT, any group considered "other," or outside the mainstream, is similarly affected by media representation.  Identities created through the media have global impact, providing us all (fairly or unfairly) with a shared "understanding" of a particular group.

All students and all voices are welcome.  Class participation will play a significant role in grading.  The more diversity we have in our own experiences the more we'll all learn this semester.  Be prepared to explore some controversial and emotional issues and to participate in frank discussions about sexuality.


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FYS 019 / CRN 3681

A BETTER WORLD: IS THERE AN APP FOR THAT?

TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Eric Manley

This course will focus on how information technology can help solve the world's problems.  Students will read and write about proposed information and communication technology (ICT)-based solutions for dealing with difficult social issues like poverty and health.  Because of the recent explosion of mobile telephony in many parts of the developing world, a special emphasis will be placed on the role of mobile devices and applications.  Students will also learn introductory programming and mobile application design principles for Apple's iPhone/iPod Touch platform so that they will be able to contribute with their own ideas as engaged global citizens.


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FYS020 / CRN 1833

GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Jill Van Wyke

If news is "the oxygen of democracy," how do you find the truth?

All information is not equal.  How do you judge the trustworthiness of what you read, watch and hear in the news media?  In this course, you'll learn to critically analyze the news media for yourself.  We will devour print, broadcast, cable and online news as we learn to become more discriminating consumers

Together we will explore:

  • What is journalism?
  • What is the purpose of journalism?
  • Who is a journalist, and who is not?
  • Whom do journalists work for?
  • What is news, and who decides?
  • If information is power, who controls the information?
  • How do you judge the reliability and credibility of news reports and news sources?
  • Are the media biased?  Can journalists be objective?
  • Who is watching the watchdogs?
  • How is the digital revolution reshaping rthe relationship between the press and the powerful,
    including government?
  • How are citizen journalism and social media influencing what news we get and how we get it?.

To answer all these questions, we will:

  • read, watch listen to a wide variety of local, national and international news coverage.
  • contrast the news coverage of an event by various news outlets.
  • meet with journalists.
  • read books and articles that critique the media.
  • tackle a series of writing assignments, including blogging, to reflect on our consumption of news and to critique news coverage.
  • use some of the same tools and skills that journalists themselves use.
  • participate in social media, as both consumers and creators of content.

Finally, we will explore how being an active, informed and critical consumer of news equips us to make good life and citizenship decisions and how our communities can benefit from what we know.


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FYS 021 / CRN 5025

THE PUZZLE OF GEOLOGIC TIME
MW
  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Kathryn Szramek

This course seeks to understand geologic time, from its discovery, its important markers, its controversies, its advancements and the scientists who help shapes its formation.  We will examine our perception of time as it relates to the seconds and minutes we live and expand that notion to 4.5 billion years of earth's history. 
Learning Goals:
Students will gain basic experience looking t geologic materials including rocks and fossils.
Students will learn how to read a geologic map.
Students will learn the major players in the development of geologic time and its major events including Hutton, Steno, and Patterson.
Students will learn the geologic history of the earth. We will spend time on the formation of the continents, oceans, atmosphere, and life.
Students will learn bout how the details of geologic time are refined as new discoveries add to the evolving story of Earth.

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FYS 022 / CRN 3303

DRAKEPEDIA: BUILDING A LIVING ARCHIVE
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Professors Claudia Frazer

Which Drake building was bombed by terrorists in the 70’s? What returning Drake student booked a ticket on an ill-fated ocean liner called the Titanic?   This seminar engages students in conducting basic historical research of and for Drake University. The class will work as a group to create Drakepedia, which will live on as a permanent and public resource. Students will uncover long-forgotten stories as they navigate the fundamental issues of historical research and writing, conduct oral histories, and explore Drake’s Special Collections and the University Archives.  This course would appeal to students with interests in creating wikis, online communities and collaborations, and students considering any major in the humanities as well as journalism, technology, law and education.


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FYS 023 / CRN 4098

DIVERSITY IS FOR EVERYONE
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Susan Breakenridge

As globalization increases, our population is becoming more diverse.  Do you have an understanding of other cultures and customs?  Do you know if you have any hidden bias?  How would you react to being discriminated against based on your race, gender, or age?  This course will focus on different points of diversity (race, ethnicity, religion, culture, gender, sexual orientation, age, etc.) AND will promote respect.  Students will be introduced to guest speakers representing diverse population for the purpose of interaction and discussion.  Students will be expected to fulfill frequent writing assignments; read and respond to scholarly research; conduct their own research; and participate in class discussions.


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FYS 024 / CRN 4099

POLITICAL SCANDALS
Professor John Todsen
MW 8:30-9:45 am


Most of the day-to-day actions of government are fairly boring in most people's eyes: voting, hearings, bureaucratic procedures, and parliamentary rules.  Even when dealing with the highest level of government, most people only hear about those issues that get reported on by the media.  That totals perhaps half a dozen topics per session of Congress in a particularly busy year.  When it gets exciting, however, people do pay attention.  Scandals are exciting but, paradoxically, are exactly when politicians least want people to pay attention.  Scandals add spice to political coverage and  attention to the downfall of sometimes-great people from high places.

An editor once wrote, "If it bleeds, it leads."  In this class, that is exactly what we will do: lead with the bleed.  We will learn about the psychology of scandal, why certain things are considered scandalous and others not, why some get away with it and others don't, and what we might expect going forward.  In addition, we will learn a good bit about historical scandals and how they have changed over time.

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FYS025 / CRN 1163 AND CO-REQUISITE POLS 001 / CRN 4193

PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICAN CHARACTER AND SOCIETY (LEARNING COMMUNITY)

TR 12:30-1:45 pm AND co-requisite course on MW 12:30-1:45 pm (crn 4193)
Professor Stacey Treat

What are the "habits of the heart" that move Americans, the beliefs and practices that shape the character of its citizens and give form to the American social order?  Beginning with de Tocqueville and continuing through Bellah et al., numerous observers have developed analyses that suggest political equality and individualism are fundamental traits of American culture.  In Democracy in America, Volume II , Tocqueville argues that "Democracy has destroyed or modified the old relations of men to one another and has established new ones."  How is this new social order doing in the early 21st Century?  In 1985, during the height of the Ronald Reagan era, Bellah et al. published Habits of the Heart:  Individualism and Commitment in American Life.  In the preface, they wrote:  The central problem of our book concerns the American individualism that Tocqueville described with a mixture of admiration and anxiety.  It seems to us that it is individualism, and not equality, as Tocqueville thought, that has marched inexorably through our history.  We are concerned that this individualism may have grown cancerous--that it may be destroying those social instruments that Tocqueville saw as moderating its more destructive potentialities, that it may be threatening the survival of freedom itself.  Bellah et al. are raising the question of "community" in the United States. And since they wrote their book 21 years ago, the growing diversity and seeming fragmentation of American society has made their concerns even more compelling. Is it possible for community to exist in a society that emphasizes radical individualism?  What are the individual's responsibilities to fellow citizens, to his/her city, state, or nation?  These and other questions will be explored in this course.

Students who register for Perspectives in American Character and Society must also register for POLS 001 (Arthur Sanders) The American Political System, taught by Professor Arthur Sanders.   Professors McAlister, Treat, and Sanders will coordinate course readings and assignments to tie together themes developed in the two classes.  Students signing up will also be housed on the same floor in a residence hall.

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FYS025 / CRN 1166 AND CO-REQUISITE POLS 001 / CRN 4192

PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICAN CHARACTER AND SOCIETY (LEARNING COMMUNITY)

TR 12:30-1:45 pm AND co-requisite course on MW 12:30-1:45 pm (crn 4192)
Professor Joan McAlister

What are the "habits of the heart" that move Americans, the beliefs and practices that shape the character of its citizens and give form to the American social order?  Beginning with de Tocqueville and continuing through Bellah et al., numerous observers have developed analyses that suggest political equality and individualism are fundamental traits of American culture.  In Democracy in America, Volume II , Tocqueville argues that "Democracy" has destroyed or modified the old relations of men to one another and has established new ones."  How is this new social order doing in the early 21st Century?  In 1985, during the height of the Ronald Reagan era, Bellah et al. published Habits of the Heart:  Individualism and Commitment in American Life.  In the preface, they wrote:  "The central problem of our book concerns the American individualism that Tocqueville described with a mixture of admiration and anxiety.  It seems to us that it is individualism, and not equality, as Tocqueville thought, that has marched inexorably through our history.  We are concerned that this individualism may have grown cancerous--that it may be destroying those social instruments that Tocqueville saw as moderating its more destructive potentialities, that it may be threatening the survival of freedom itself."  Bellah et al. are raising the question of "community" in the United States. And since they wrote their book 21 years ago, the growing diversity and seeming fragmentation of American society has made their concerns even more compelling. Is it possible for community to exist in a society that emphasizes radical individualism?  What are the individual's responsibilities to fellow citizens, to his/her city, state, or nation?  These and other questions will be explored in this course.

Students who register for Perspectives in American Character and Society must also register for POLS 001 (Arthur Sanders) The American Political System, taught by Professor Arthur Sanders.   Professors McAlister, Treat, and Sanders will coordinate course readings assignments to tie together themes developed in the two classes.  Students signing up will also be housed on the same floor in a residence hall.


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FYS 026 / CRN 2929

POLITICAL SCANDALS
Professor John Todsen
TR  12:30-1:45 pm


Most of the day-to-day actions of government are fairly boring in most people's eyes: voting, hearings, bureaucratic procedures, and parliamentary rules.  Even when dealing with the highest level of government, most people only hear about those issues that get reported on by the media.  That totals perhaps half a dozen topics per session of Congress in a particularly busy year.  When it gets exciting, however, people do pay attention.  Scandals are exciting but, paradoxically, are exactly when politicians least want people to pay attention.  Scandals add spice to political coverage and  attention to the downfall of sometimes-great people from high places.

An editor once wrote, "If it bleeds, it leads."  In this class, that is exactly what we will do: lead with the bleed.  We will learn about the psychology of scandal, why certain things are considered scandalous and others not, why some get away with it and others don't, and what we might expect going forward.  In addition, we will learn a good bit about historical scandals and how they have changed over time.

 

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FYS027 / CRN 3437

PHYSICS FOR FUTURE PRESIDENTS

MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Klaus Bartschat

We will discuss the book "Physics for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlines" by A. Muller.  Without using any formulas, the author discusses the major topics of "Terrorism", "Energy", "Nuclear Weapons", "Space", and "Global Warming".  The book is meant for the non-scientist (e.g. most American Presidents), who may have to make critical decisions on issues either directly related to science or in which scientific arguments are used as a major input in the decision making.  These people need some "common sense" in order to distinguish facts from fiction, to think critically about the arguments being brought forward, and to realize how positions can be vastly exaggerated.  The principal learning goal of the course is to see  physics as a potentially important ally in their job -- rather than something they should be afraid of.


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FYS 028 / CRN 3006

SEEING - BELIEVING
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Ted Lyddon Hatten

This course will offer an opportunity to explore the connection between seeing and believing. Is seeing believing? Is our vision limited by what we believe? Are our beliefs limited by what we can see? What do beliefs look like? Since religion has a long history of turning to the visual arts to express its beliefs ( iconophilia), and turning from representation of the divine (iconoclasm), this interdisciplinary journey will lead us to the intersection of art and religion. We will examine visual manifestations of belief through architecture, sculpture, painting. We will consider the distinction between sacred and profane through writing assignments focused on space, objects, and time. As a First Year Seminar (FYS), this course will be writing-intensive.  It will include significant time spent on the revision of your writing.  You will have the opportunity to read your work to the class through formal and informal presentations.  This FYS will be conducted in a seminar-style format in which discussion will be the primary mode of engagement.

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FYS 029 / CRN 4509

RUNNING: BODY, MIND, SOLE
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor David Senchina

Running is a sport unto itself but also integral to other sports such as soccer, lacrosse, rugby, football, and baseball/softball, to name just a few.  Even more Americans enjoy running as a regular recreational activity.  It takes many forms including recreational and competitive, short and long distance, on flat-surfaced and cross-country.  In this FYS, we will examine running from three main perspectives: body (the biology of running), mind (the psychology of running), and sole (running in a global, social, and economic contexts).  The courses emphasizes scientific aspects of running, including the history of its study, understanding how and why we run, current research techniques and philosophies, and the ability to think critically, logically, and rationally about literature on running or marketing claims about running-related sports products such as running shoes.  Students will regularly be engaged in writing about running through multiple contexts, such as their own experiences inside and outside of class, as well as in response to others’ writings on running.


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FYS 030 / CRN 5182

TECHNOLOGY FOR MATHEMATICS
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Luz DeAlba

The goals of this FYS are to introduce students to a wide variety of technology resources useful in the analysis and communication of mathematics.  Specifically, the pedagogy will seek to advance students' knowledge of Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word, Geometer's Sketchpad, Mathematica, and Maple, and to improve their writing skills.  If time permits, an additional unit on mathematics typesetting with Latex will be introduced. The use of this technology will be based on basic mathematical topics, and will seek to promote critical thinking.  The use of computer technology will allow students to experiment, and to communicate mathematics effectively.

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FYS 031 / CRN 3214

CONNECTING THE DOTS FOR A SOCIALLY JUST WORLD
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Jan Walker

What is a socially just environment?  How do out decisions in everyday life contribute to this environment?  This course is designed to increase one's understanding of how assumptions about diversity and equity connect to our behaviors and decisions/consequences.  It is about connecting the dots of social behavior within our society.  The seminar provides a platform for students to examine and reflect on their understanding of social justice and challenges them to act and make decisions relative to a socially just environment for all.  This seminar will include instructor presentation of content topics, student participation in small, interactive group activities, reflective and critical discussion of outside readings and  research, and reflective writing.

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FYS 032 / CRN 5066

MANIFESTO!
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Renee Cramer

What would it take for you to publicly declare your stance on important political, artistic, and technological issues?  How would you organize your beliefs and engage your audience?  How could your argument be it's most powerful, while also allowing the reader to enter into it, in solidarity? The writers of manifestos urgently engage these challenges, and have contributed t our political and cultural discourses with texts like:  The U.S. Declaration of Independence, the French Revolution's Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, the Communist Manifesto, and the Anarchist Manifesto.  We'll read significant portions of these texts, as well as contemporary manifestos, from The Port Huron Statement, to Inga Mujsico's Cunt, from Donna Haraway's Cyborg and Companion Species Manifestos, to Rob Dreher's Crunchy Cons: A Conservative Manifesto.  Besides a (heavy) reading load of inspiring, infuriating, and exciting texts, our class will include writing analytical papers comparing and contrasting the aims, styles, and  logics of these manifestos, while working to write our own manifesto as a culminating experience.  Come with an open mind, and an interest in why people feel as passionately as they do about the power of the written word to change minds, cultures, and politics.


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FYS033 / CRN 3308

MONEY MATTERS: FINANCIAL LITERACY SKILLS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

TR  3:30-4:45 pm
Professor Sally Beisser

Money Matters!  Do you want to know more about trends and issues in how college students spend, save, borrow, or invest money?  Do you want to develop skills in persona l money management?  Are you curious about how millionaires make their fortunes?  Are you interested in differences in how males and females handle finances or invest their money?  Are you safe from identity theft?  Do you just want to increase your financial literacy?  If so, this class is for you.  You can improve your financial literacy, regardless of your skills at the present time in your life.  Bring a good attitude to class.

This course will help you think critically about finances, reflect on your own financial knowledge and habits, and learn from the experiences of others using current finance resources, journal readings, and learning from guest speakers, as well as peers in your class.  You will reflect financial literacy course content, knowledge, and dispositions through class discussions, writings, reflections, and a final Money Matters end of semester project.

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FYS034 / CRN 3201

FOOD HISTORY/LOCAL TO GLOBAL

MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Amahia Mallea

Eating is more than sustenance.  It is an evolutionary, biological, political, social and environmental act, it is an expression of culture, it forms the backbone of economies and undergirds relationships.  In fact, what isn't eating?  These are all ideas that we will consider in various eras and places because food and the eating of it have changed over time.  Most of our readings focus on American  food history but we'll connect local and global issues and places by looking at subjects like meat, corn and sugar.  These subjects will illuminate the industrialization of food and the increasing globalization of the food system.  Main themes of our readings, discussions and papers will be politics, environment and culture.  We will experience food intellectually -- through readings and discussion -- but also in tactile and social ways -- like cooking, eating and visiting farmers' market.

This course aims to 1) improve your writing skills, 2) improve your ability to think critically and analyze materials, and 3) make you an informed and responsible citizen of Drake, the Midwest and the world; by investigating the past, you will understand the critical questions related to food today.


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FYS 035 / CRN 5176

THE LIBERAL AGENDA
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Leah Kalmanson

In college, you'll encounter political views, both inside and outside of your classes, that may challenge the ideas that you held before coming to college, ideas that your family still hold, or ideas that hold sway in today's media.  In particular, you may find that the word "liberal" has a long and confusing history, with a meaning that ranges from "free market capitalist" to "welfare state socialist."  This class will cover the history of the word "liberal," with a focus not on advocating a particular political standpoint but on helping you navigate the convoluted political language that marks today's debates.

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FYS036 / CRN 3663

THE MEANING OF PUNK

MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Martin Roth

To many "punk rock" signifies more than a way of making music; it also signifies a set of beliefs and attitudes about how to live.  In this class, we will consider whether there is a well-definable and coherent "philosophy of punk,," a philosophy that articulates a sustainable way of living.  We'll start by exploring the social, economic, artistic, and political contexts in which punk rock emerged, developed and evolved.  Along the way, we will examine the relationship between punk rock and various conceptions of rebellion, anarchy, and self-expression.  This course will draw from a variety of disciplines (e.g. history, psychology, sociology, and philosophy) and use a variety of learning materials (books, articles, recordings, videos, photographs).  Students will be challenged to analyze and synthesize complex data, all in the service of drawing well-supported conclusions about the course topics.

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FYS 037 / CRN 2193

"ALL RIVERS RUN TO THE SEA...BUT THE SEA IS NEVER FULL"
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Jim Laurenzo

This course centers around the research, the discussion, and the application of beliefs, ideas and interpretations relating to the Law, the Wisdom and the Prophetic literature of the Bible. Using the Jewish Study Bible we will attempt to hear, as best we can today, the original voice of these biblical texts.

 This literature, within the Bible, offers a wide perspective on ourselves, as human beings, and our world as created and being created by us (in part) and God. 

The Book of Job is both a long poem and an important debate which urges its readers to ask and discover life’s meaning.  The Book of Ecclesiastes calls us to question and reflect—and even challenge.  All the books of the prophets are word of God in human words reflecting how human life is to be lived.  The book of Genesis is about beginnings and one of the last books finally edited for its place in the Bible.

Crucial to all these biblical texts is our interpretation and application of them.  This course intends to struggle with these texts through critical reading, researching, discussion, and application of these important ideas to our lives and our world through the use of modern critical methods of Bible research and scholarship.

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FYS 038 / CRN 1916

EXPLORING THE PORTRAYAL OF MENTAL ILLNESS AND INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES IN THE MEDIA
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Anisa Fornoff

Stigmatization of mental illness and intellectual disabilities is readily apparent in the media today. This class will focus on identifying and dispelling the myths of these diagnoses and gaining an understanding of the true nature of these conditions. Students will view select media and work in small groups to present information to the class regarding the diagnosis criteria and accurate presentation for the condition portrayed in the film. Student writing will focus on comparing and contrasting the differences between the film or book and the factual information provided from the presentation. The class will discuss the history of mental illness in our country, the definition on intellectual disability, and the effects of stigma.  Students will also be introduced to supportive resources available on and off campus.

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FYS 039 / CRN 2941

WOMEN IN THE BIBLE: MATES, MOTHERS, MURDERS, AND MORE
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Trisha Wheelock

This class will explore the depiction of women in biblical literature and in social and cultural contexts of both ancient Israel and the Mediterranean world.  We will consider the roles women play within biblical narratives, the presentations of femininity and feminine in biblical traditions, the legal/ethical precepts related to the status of women.  We will read both biblical texts and secondary literature.  In addition, we will reflect on the influence of these texts to the lives of women and men in the church and question their significance for life in the twenty-first century.  Goals of the course include: gain familiarity with biblical texts concerning women in their social and cultural contexts, explore an use the tools and methods of biblical interpretations, reflect how biblical women both operated within and challenged the expectations placed on them, analyze various methodological steams of biblical interpretation, and question how - or if - biblical texts concerning women should impact contemporary church life.  No prior knowledge of Jewish and Christian canonical texts is assumed.  Writing assignments include weekly reading journals, two reflection papers, a research paper and a group project.


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FYS 041/CRN 5490

CHINA'S ECONOMIC FUTURE & ITS EFFECT ON THE WORLD
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Rick Long

A study of China's current and future economic environment based in a context of the country's history, culture, and politics.

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FYS042 / CRN 1670

DIGITAL LEARNING, DIGITAL PEOPLE

TR 3:30-4:45 pm
Professors Bruce Gilbert and Carrie Dunham-Lagree

What does an individual need to know to be an informed digital citizen?  How do the technologies themselves affect our concepts of citizenship?  And do these technologies even affect our broader concepts of humanity?  Learning goals will revolve around the campus Info Lit rubric.
Required text will include:  The Tyranny of E-Mail by John Freeman.

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FYS 043 / CRN 3209

CREATING A CULTURE OF WELLNESS
MW  8:30-9:45 Am
Professor Johanna Determann

Every day individuals are faced with decisions that impact their health and well being.  In creating a culture of wellness it is important to examine the nature of how individuals make decisions that produce health behavior change.  This course will focus on the application of behavior theories such as the Health Belief Model, Transtheoretical Model, Social Learning Theory, and Theory of Reasoned Action as they relate to creating a culture of wellness among college students.  In addition to theory-based content, this course will examine the role mental models of wellness play in the decision making process regarding behavior change.  This course will provide students with information pertaining to multiple dimensions of wellness (physical, social, emotional, environmental, and intellectual) and how each dimension is impacted by personal values, beliefs, and actions.

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FYS 044 / CRN 1744

PERCEPTIONS OF ILLNESS: HOW WE VIEW THE SICK
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Professor John Rovers

This course is intended for all majors, not just those wanting a health careers.  In this course you will learn to:

  • Distinguish between various methods used to describe the sick and the healthy and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.
  • Discuss what society wants from the sick and what the sick want from society.
  • Articulate your personal response to disease and understand why you had the response you did.
  • Decide whether or not you believe that the common metaphors for disease are or are not useful constructs for both patients and providers.
  • Reach a personal conclusion for how you believe the "science" part of health care is best related to the "care" part of health care.

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FYS 045 / CRN 5491

AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Jack Fellers

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FYS046 / CRN 3213

GENEROSITY OF THE HEART

MW 8:30-9:45 am
Professors Pam Pepper & Blake Campbell

This course will be broken into three major themes:
1) What is Philanthropy?
2) Philanthropy in Action
3) My Philanthropy

Out goal is to have our students understand and appreciate the power of philanthropy, both locally and globally, actively participate in philanthropy and work to define their own personal philanthropy philosophy.

In this seminar we will review literature and relate research findings, on various aspects of philanthropy to their experiences inside and outside the classroom.  We will also have students explore philanthropy through active participation.  As a class, they will research and choose an organization where the class will spend a minimum of two hours experiencing philanthropy as a group.  Examples of this might include spending time participating in a local fundraising event, feeding the homeless, or other outreach activities.  We plan to have a Panel Presentation where donors and representatives of local non-profit and community organizations discuss the work they do and the reasons behind their involvement.

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FYS 047 / CRN 3691

MAKING THE MOST OF COLLEGE
MW  12:30-1:45 PM
Professosr Kelli Pitts & Leigh Thiedeman

This class is a sneak preview of the next 4 years of your life! Topics will examine why college is worth more than a piece of paper (your degree). The course will cover various aspects of higher education, including student services, the history of higher education, and the sheer dollars and cents of college. General themes will focus on enhancing the college experience and understanding a liberal arts education and student development theories. Students will gain insight about the benefits of college and how to utilize their resources to be successful.

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FYS048 / CRN 4096

DARING TO DREAM: THE STORIES OF BUSINESS

MW 8:30-9:45 am
Professor Deb Bishop

Who were key players in business history: Passion, timing, connections -- what makes a business grow?  Why do some businesses continue to thrive while others are long gone?  We will investigate the ups and downs in the history of business, learn from the popular stories and discover the little-known facts.  We will use readings, videos, research, and observation to take a critical look at how the business world reached where it is today and dream about what might be ahead.


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FYS049 / CRN 5531

DARING TO DREAM: THE STORIES OF BUSINESS
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Deb Bishop

Who were key players in business history: Passion, timing, connections -- what makes a business grow?  Why do some businesses continue to thrive while others are long gone?  We will investigate the ups and downs in the history of business, learn from the popular stories and discover the little-known facts.  We will use readings, videos, research, and observation to take a critical look at how the business world reached where it is today and dream about what might be ahead

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FYS050 / CRN 5752

AMERICAN IDENTITY AND THE RHETORICAL LANDSCAPE
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Meryl Irwin

Students will consider the multiple ways that "land" has functioned in public talk about the collective "identity" in the United States.  Students will begin by closely reading theoretical works linking nature, space, and location to the formation of personal and public values.  These readings will then be considered in light of public controversies where "land" functions in various ways: as an object of direct contention; as a symbolic repository for communal anxiety; as a "scene," "actor," or "means of action" in public debate over other topics; as linked to the personal and collective "character" of Americans by means of spirituality, science, physical endurance, etc.  These historic and contemporary events will provide a context in which to explore reciprocal symbolic and political impacts of the physical and cultural landscapes of the United States on one another.

 

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FYS 051 / CRN 5799

GOT SPIRITUALITY?
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Professor Jennifer Harvey

It is not uncommon to hear someone say of herself: "I'm not religious, but I'm spiritual."  But, what is spirituality and what does it mean to "be spiritual"?  Is spirituality innate in the human experience or something learned and cultivated?  When and where do we experience our spiritual nature?  Is the claim to a non-religious spirituality particularly characteristic of today's generation of college students?  We attend to intellectual development during the college years.  To what extent should spiritual development be a focus of the college experience?  And, finally, is there any significance to the claimed shift away from religion --phenomenon with which spirituality has most often been associated in the past?  What is lost in such a shift and what is gained?  In this course we will explore these questions.  Our focus will be wide-ranging--from inquiry into recent studies on today's college student population's understanding of their own spirituality to explorations of the relationship between spirituality and sexuality.  The intention is that students come away with a multi-faceted, nuanced understanding of a variety of interpretations of spirituality in human life.  This course will be interdisciplinary in nature.

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University News
October 29, 2014
The Drake University Board of Trustees recently approved new degree programs in mathematics, science, education, technology, and health sciences while taking initial steps to further enhance the University’s programming through $65 million in new construction and renovation.
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