2017 Fall FYS Courses

FYS 001 (2931) SPORTS/CULTURE

FYS 002 (6958/6611) THE DREAM FACTORY: HOLLYWOOD IN THE 1930s/LAB

FYS 003 (6453) BANNED BOOKS

FYS 005 (6959) COMPOSING THE FEMALE BODY

FYS 006 (6456) SCIENCE IN SPORT

FYS 008 (7469) INVENTION OF WINGS AND CONTEXT

FYS 009 (6479) JANE AUSTEN & ADAPTATION

FYS 010 (6481) REACTING TO THE PAST: FORCES OF CHANGE

FYS 011 (6968 + 6969) DIVERSITY IN THE U.S/LAB

FYS 012 (6967) COMICS & SOCIAL DIVERSITY

FYS 014 (6485) 21st CENTURY POETRY: POETRY IN THE AGE OF HIP-HOP

FYS 015 (6515) RELIGION AND SCIENCE

FYS 016 (6486) STORY: THE ART & SCIENCE

FYS 017 (6568) THE REAL HUNGER GAMES:FOOD IN AMERICA

FYS 018 (7498) BEATLES POPULAR MUSIC & SOCIETY

FYS 019 (6964) FOOD HISTORY: LOCAL TO GLOBAL

FYS 021 (7906) BAD RELIGION: HOW GOOD RELIGIONS GO BAD

FYS 022 (7003) LISTENING IN A DIGITAL WORLD

FYS 024 (6962) THE COMMON GOOD

FYS 025 (7474) AMERICAN DREAMS

FYS 026 (6593) VISUALIZING DIFFERENCE

FYS 027 (3437) ETHICS & STAR TREK

FYS 029 (7907) CONTEMPLATIVE PRACTICES: FLIGHT

FYS 030 (6963) ENERGY FOR FUTURE PRESIDENTS

FYS 031 (7002) SCIENCE FICTION & PHILOSOPHY

FYS 032 (6973) NEW YORK, NEW YORK

FYS 034 (6975) LEARNING FOR DUMMIES: A STUDENT CENTERED APPROACH

FYS 035 (5176) LIFE IN THE KEY OF EM: WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM THE AMERICAN BLUES MUSIC MOVEMENT

FYS 036 (3663) UNDERGROUND VOICES: AMATEUR MEDIA

FYS 037 (6976) HEROES & VILLIANS IN MYTHOLOGY & MOVIES

FYS 038 (1916) EXPLORING THE PORTRAYAL OF MENTAL ILLNESS

FYS 042 (6979) CAN YOU REASON WITH THE LAW?

FYS 043 (7503) #BLACKLIVESMATTER

FYS 044 (7058) WOMEN IN THE BIBLE: MATES, MOTHERS, MURDERS, AND MORE

FYS 045 (6980) FAMOUS & ALMOST FAMOUS WOMEN

FYS 046 (7041) FANDOM & FANFICTION

FYS 047 (6982) LIGHTS, CAMERA...SCIENCE?

FYS 048 (6983) SCIENCE FICTION,SCIENCE FACT

FYS 049 (6984) ADAPTATION – READING FILMS BASED ON OTHER SOURCES

FYS 050 (7952) LOVECRAFT: HORROR & MADNESS


Sports/Culture
FYS 001 (CRN 2931)

Nancy Reincke
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

The subject of this course is 1) the role of sports within U.S. culture; 2) how culture determines the nature of U.S. sports; 3) the cultures of specific sports. Major topics will include fandom and spectatorship; how sports provide meaning; the economics of sports; social justice and sports (gender, race, sexuality); contemporary issues in sports in historical context.

Learning goals in addition to the general FYS goals include discerning and reflecting upon the power dynamics within an institution such as sports; critical awareness of how an institution such as sports shapes personal identity and cultural values; familiarity with the conventions of representing sports; developing independence with regard to formulating and researching a critical question.


The Dream Factory: Hollywood in the 1930s
FYS 002 (CRN 6958)
FYS 002 LAB (6611)

Dina Smith
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.
S 5:30-8:15 p.m (Lab)

This course is an examination of the role that sports play in our culture, from the Pee Wee League to the Pros. What value do we assign to sports? What values do we learn from sports? How do we make the most of the benefits of sports?

Students will read about the economic and cultural history of 1930s Hollywood as well as explore the unique genres that engaged Depression-era audiences, such as the delightful and politically transgressive “screwball comedy” and the class conscious “backstage musical.” Students will watch several, black-and-white movies of the era with the goal of connecting these films, via close analysis, to their 1930s context.


Banned Books
FYS 003 (CRN 6453)
Beth Younger
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

This FYS focuses on the restriction of reading materials, primarily in the United States, a practice known as "book banning." What kinds of materials are considered “offensive?” Why do some groups (or individuals) try to restrict access to certain books? We will also grapple with questions of literary and social value, feminism, sexuality, language, and representation.


Composing the Female Body
FYS 005 (CRN 6959)
Yasmina Madden
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Students will read and write extensively about the ways the female body has been composed in contemporary literature, film, and popular culture. How do we “write” the female body? How do we rely on, reify, or resist Western cultural definitions of women’s bodies? Students will engage with fiction, memoir, personal essay, film, and critical texts.


Science and Sport
FYS 006 (CRN 6456)
Nate Newman
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Science and sport are two common fields of interest in the American culture. They can coexist without each other. However, combining these two fields together has produced a variety of successes and failures that have furthered the knowledge, enjoyment, and experiences of many in the two fields. Concussions, performance enhancing drugs, genetic testing, and career longevity are some of the areas where science and sport have more recently overlapped. These areas will be focused on in this class while introducing students to critical thinking, college writing, and the liberal arts.


The Invention of Wings and Context
FYS 008 (CRN 7469)
Lisa West
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

This FYS will focus on reading the recent Sue Monk Kidd novel about the life of Sarah Grimke. There will be substantial research in the class, as students select contextual research topics, which might include research on the Grimke sisters, Quakers, Charleston, SC newspapers, the Denmark Vesey rebellion, or early 19th century representations of slavery.


Jane Austen & Adaptation
FYS 009 (CRN 6479)
Professor Melisa Klimaszewski
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

What makes the films Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Clueless resonate 200 years after Jane Austen published the novels Pride and Prejudice and Emma? How do Austen’s novels relate to race, slavery, and marriage laws? What makes these books funny? Reading novels, viewing films, and studying literary criticism, this FYS builds critical thinking and writing skills while investigating the intriguing questions above."


Reacting to the Past: Forces of Change
FYS 010 (CRN 6481)
Elizabeth Robertson
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

This course examines China and England at moments of political/cultural crises in which radical changes challenge traditional beliefs. Through enacting historical roles, students debate and write about major ideas and texts: The Confucian Analects for China; More’s Utopia, Machiavelli’s The Prince, and Erasmus for Henry VIII and the Reformation Parliament.


Diversity in the U.S/ Lab
FYS 011 (CRN 6968 & 6969)
Sandi Patton Imani
MW 12:30 -1:45 p.m.; Lab M 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.

This course will explore issues of diversity in the U.S. through a narrative framework. We will consider storytelling about the U.S. and its “diverse” people at the individual, familial, cultural, media, and institutional levels. Students will explore questions of identity and the various routes by which we arrive at understandings of who we are as individuals and members of various groups. These routes include the literal paths our families took in moving from place to place as well as more metaphorical routes such as the paths established for all of us to follow based on our nationality, gender, race, socioeconomic class, sexuality, and level of mental and physical ability, among others.

One of our goals will be to come to a fuller understanding of ourselves and of the various communities we inhabit. We will critically explore and analyze public and personal narratives about immigration, family, and the “American Dream,” including attention to the stories that don’t often get told publically. Students will participate in a service-learning project about diversity with 5th grade students at a local International Baccalaureate Elementary School. The service-learning lab will be devoted to working with them on collaborative digital storytelling projects that will be shared publically at the end of the semester.


Comics & Social Diversity
FYS 012 (CRN 6967)
Jeff Karnicky
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

In this course, we will look at how comics have portrayed social difference, and more recently, how diversity in comics’ creators and audiences has affected the production of contemporary comics.
The following course objectives will be used for the class.

Course Objectives

  • Under the history of comics as it relates to race, ethnicity, class, gender, nation, and other forms of identity
  • Become close readers of comics
  • Use research to support and inform your writing
  • Engage in class discussion in a focused, serious manner
  • Examine the racial and gendered stereotypes that mid-20th century comics employed, and think about how these compare to contemporary comics
  • Think about the ways comics have engaged social issues and instigated for changes in social norms
  • Examine how the comics industry has become more diverse in its creators and its audience and think about how this affects the production of comics

21st Century Poetry: Poetry in the Age of Hip Hop
FYS 014 (CRN 6485)
Brian Spears
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

In this course, students will examine the work of 21st century poets and their modern influences. Also, given HipHop's origins as a music of politics and protest, students will examine how contemporary poets engage with social and political movements in their art.


Religion and Science
FYS 015 (CRN 6515)
Karen Zwier
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

What is Science? What is Religion? Why has there been so much conflict in western history between these cultural forces, and is such conflict inevitable? This course offers an examination of these and other questions by examining the historical interaction of science and religion in western culture.


Story: The Art & Science
FYS 016 (CRN 6486)
Amy Letter
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Writers study their art, asking, what makes stories exciting? What makes characters come alive? Scientists also ask questions: what do brains do while reading stories? Why did fictional storytelling evolve in the first place? In this course we will look at how writers and scientists have tried to understand STORY.


The Real Hunger Games: Food in America
FYS 017 (CRN 6568)
Carlyn Crowe
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

And you thought The Hunger Games was just a movie?! This First Year Seminar will explore food security, food politics, food systems and food integrity in the United States examining how food is grown, produced, distributed, marketed, reported on and understood by US citizens. And then we’ll see if we’re living in our own hunger games.


Beatles Popular Music & Society
FYS 018 (CRN 7498)
Todd Evans
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

What is it about The Beatles that continues to amaze and baffle us? How did it all Come Together and why are we so fascinated with their music and lives 53 years after their first television appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show? Let’s find out.


Food History: Local to Global
FYS 019 (CRN 6964)
Amahia Mallea
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Explore the history of food from local communities to global forces. Course themes include policy, labor, environment and culture. We will experience food intellectually—through readings and discussion—but also in social ways—like cooking, eating and visiting farmers’ market.


Bad Religion: How Good Religions Go Bad
FYS 021 (CRN 7906)
Brad Crowell
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Most of the controversial religions of the 20th and early 21st century begin as unassuming communities practicing a standard form of their faith. Over time these small groups of believers begin to innovate and change that standard religion into something radical and, for many observers, dangerous. Bad Religion will examine three of the most controversial religious movements of the twentieth century: Jim Jones and Jonestown, the Branch Davidians at Waco, and the Heavens Gate movement. The semester will end with an examination of a recent group who murdered one of its members in October 2016, the Word of Life community in Chadwicks, NY.


Listening in a Digital World
FYS 022 (CRN 7003)
Nancy Berns
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

This course will focus on the importance of listening, including how to listen effectively. Students will have an interdisciplinary experience drawing from sociology, anthropology, psychology, and communication studies in order to understand the complexity of listening.  We will discuss how various factors affect our ability to listen, including culture, technology, conflict, politics, religion, social status, power, gender, and interpersonal relations.  We will also learn how effective listening can promote effective political discourse, conflict resolution, healing, and deeper personal relationships.


The Common Good
FYS 024 (CRN 6962)
Kodee Wright
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

This first year seminar is only open to students selected into the Engaged Citizen Corps. For more information about the Engaged Citizen Corps please visit: http://www.drake.edu/servicelearning/forstudents/serviceprogramsandorganizations/engagedcitizencorps

Drake's mission is to provide an exceptional learning environment that prepares students for meaningful personal lives, professional accomplishments, and responsible global citizenship. As entering first year students selected for the Engaged Citizen Corps, you will address concepts, issues, and practices of social justice for the common good. Students will utilize their weekly service placement as an extension of our classroom learning and textbook, spend time in reflective observation and active participatory research to understand their individual contributions towards serving the Common Good.


American Dreams
FYS 025 (CRN 7474)
Joan McAlister
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m. AND co-requisite course POLS 001 (CRN 4192)
Arthur Sanders
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

This Honors learning community critically examines the American Dream, considering its shifting representations, historical exclusions, and role in public life and national identity. Together, we explore key values such as liberty, equality, and freedom, as well as concerns about the role of individualism, materialism, and social justice in defining success in America.

Students in this FYS will be simultaneously enrolled in a special section of POLS001, American Political Systems, which will examine the same questions as they play out in American politics and government.


Visualizing Difference
FYS 026 (CRN 6593)
Janet Wirth-Cauchon
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

This course explores the construction of diverse socio-cultural images, identities, and experiences through film and media. Through study of several examples, we will analyze cultural messages about social groups, events, and perspectives, the influence of such images on social perceptions of diversity, and how audiences respond to such messages. Assignments will include several essay papers as well as a collaborative group project.


Ethics and Star Trek
FYS 027 (CRN 3437)
Jerome Hilscher
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Using Star Trek Episodes we will examine a variety of out of this world conundrums, and apply differing ethical theories to the decision making process. You will be required to watch a few episodes on your own, but you do not need to be a Trekkie. Live long, and prosper.


Contemplative Practices: FLIGHT
FYS 029 (CRN 7907)
Joan McAlister
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

In a variety of contexts, increasing attention is being given to the connections that exist between contemplative practices (meditation, yoga, artistic reflection, community-building) and self-care, social justice and academic success. In this course, we will explore these connections while focusing on the Drake experience of a first year student who will face many challenges, demands and opportunities. Our inquiry together will be both academic and experiential, as we explore questions about how to sustain a commitment to personal well-being and academic success while simultaneously engaging larger questions about social justice.


Energy for Future Presidents
FYS 030 (CRN 6963)
Klaus Bartschat
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

We discuss the book "Energy for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlines", which deals with "Energy Catastrophes", the current "Energy Landscape", and "Alternative Energy". The seminar is meant for the non-scientist (most politicians and lawmakers) who needs to make sensible energy decisions without detailed knowledge of the underlying science.


Science Fiction & Philosophy
FYS 031 (CRN 7002)
Martin Roth
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

“You unlock this door with the key of imagination. Beyond it is another dimension—a dimension of sound, a dimension of sight, a dimension of mind. You’re moving into a land of both shadow and substance, of things and ideas. You’ve just crossed over into the Twilight Zone.”

Science fiction and philosophy each has a venerable history of using the strange and fantastic to examine and challenge the familiar, and in this course we will use works of science fiction to explore a number of philosophical issues, including knowledge, free will, and the mind.


New York, New York
FYS 032 (CRN 6973)
Mary Beth Holtey
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

New York City has served as the backdrop for books, movies and television shows. It’s an icon. But how did New York City move from Dutch colony to one of the world’s most influential cities? This course will examine the city’s history in the context of location and reform.


Learning for Dummies: A Student-Centered Approach
FYS 034, (CRN 6975)
Dana Walton
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Academic and personal success are a combination of many factors. The class is designed to help students;

  • Understand themselves as a learner and learn academic skills;
  • Engage in activities that will facilitate communication, critical thinking and leadership skills
  • Learn self –care strategies that will improve the quality of your life

Life in the key of Em: What we can learn from the American Blues music movement
FYS 035 (CRN 5176)
Thomas Buckmiller
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

What happened to Robert Johnson at the Crossroads? Who are the three Kings of the blues and why are they important? What is the difference between a shuffle and straight time? Who influenced modern blues players like Stevie Ray Vaughan, Eric Clapton, Jack White and others?

We will read, write and think critically about the Blues by: listening to recordings of various Blues players, hearing live performances from several local Blues artists and discussing the historic, geographic, social, and cultural concepts associated with American Blues music. Students in the class will grapple with how the Blues is relevant today and think about lessons we can learn from this form of music. The class will feature various guest speakers/musicians to share why Blues music is important to them.


Underground Voices: Amateur Media
FYS 036 (CRN 3663)
Bartholomew Schmidt
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Amateurs have long used underground newspapers, zines, blogs, and social media to spread their stories. This course will explore non-professional art, news, and media of the last half century. We will examine this mostly amateur, DIY segment of the media and try to describe what separates it from the mainstream.


Heroes and Villians in Mythology and Movies
FYS 037 (CRN 6976)
Robert Stensrud
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m

This course will examine themes regarding the roles heroes and villains play in the myths of ancient cultures and contemporary movies. Students will study the psychology, history, and culture of the hero or villain they select through readings and movies and represent their character through analytical papers and class discussions.


Exploring the Portrayal of Mental Illness 
FYS 038 (CRN 1916)
Anisa Fornoff
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Stigmatization of mental illness and intellectual disabilities is readily apparent in the media. Class will focus on recognizing stigma, factual knowledge of different disorders, and locating resources. Students complete a service-learning project outside regular class time at a special education high school, participating in classroom activities with students with disabilities.


Can you Reason with the Law?
FYS 042 (CRN 6979)
J. Royce Fichtner
MW 12:30- 1:45 p.m.

This course is intended to help students learn how to think and read “like a lawyer.” It will focus on the development of a civil lawsuit from start to finish and teach students how to brief a legal case. Students will also learn how to effectively frame a legal argument.


#BlackLivesmatter
FYS 043 (CRN 7503)
Tony Tyler
TR 3:30-4:45 p.m.

“The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice” – MLK.

"Freedom! Freedom! I can't move/Freedom, cut me loose!/Freedom!Freedom! Where are you?/'Cause I need freedom too!"" (Beyonce, Freedom, Lemonade, 2016) This highly interactive, multi-disciplinary course will examine the Black Lives Matter movement as well as both historical and contemporary justice movements via lenses of power, access, and social dynamics.


Women in the Bible: Mates, Mothers, Murders, and More
FYS 044 (CRN 7058)
Trisha Wheelock
MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

This class explores the presentation of women in the bible. We will investigate the historical contexts of these texts, building a picture of what life was like for women in ancient Israel and the ancient Mediterranean world. Comparing feminist, literary, and socio-historical readings, we will consider the influence of these texts and question their significance for life in the twenty first century.


Famous & Almost Famous Women
FYS 045 (CRN 6980)
Carrie Dunham-LaGree
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

This course explores fictional depictions of real women in fiction and film. Much of history is the story of men. With less historical information about women, fiction writers and filmmakers have freedom to use their creativity and imagination to fill in gaps. Together we’ll read, watch films, write, research, and discuss the facts and fiction.


Fanfiction: Transformation of Fandom
FYS 046 (CRN 7041)
Sam Becker
TR 3:30-4:45 p.m.

Students will critically engage with fanfiction and fanculture throughout the semester culminating in the researching and writing of a fanfiction and meta-analysis of their process. We will examine the research as a process as well as the close reading and integration of primary source material into transformative works.


Lights, Camera...Science?
FYS 047 (CRN 6982)
Katie Putney
MW 8:00-9:15 a.m.

Lights, camera... science?
"Everything I learned I learned from the movies."- Audrey Hepburn
In this course we will explore how science is portrayed by Hollywood. Students will be guided through an examination of how the scientific method, scientists, and various scientific concepts such as biodiversity, climate change, and evolution, are illustrated in popular movies. From Jurassic Park to The Martian, we'll discuss the impact this art form can have on society's views of science and our understanding of the world around us.


Science Fiction, Science Fact
FYS 048 (CRN 6983)
Dan Chibnall
MW 8:00-9:15 a.m.

"Science fiction storytelling often predicts scientific achievements, warns of darker scientific efforts, illuminates facts in the face of pseudoscience, and helps us navigate social problems. We will use science fiction stories and films to understand scientific principles and achievements, separate facts and falsehoods, and explore our future for scientific discoveries."


Adaptation -- Reading Films Based On Other Sources
FYS 049 (CRN 6984)
Nick Renkoski
TR 12:30-1:45 p.m.

More than half of current Hollywood movies are based on other sources but what is the process of bringing a story from page or stage to the screen? What things are gained, and what things are lost? This FYS examines the range and forms these transformations can take.


Lovecraft: Horror & Madness
FYS 050 (CRN 7952)
Kyle McCord
TR 3:30-4:45 p.m.

Lovecraft: Horror and Madness: This course introduces students to the horrifying writing of Howard Phillips Lovecraft. Students produce their own works of horror, consider Lovecraft in the context of contemporary scholarship, and analyze his themes and their contemporary horror on the page and screen. Discussions center on expanding students’ understanding of the connection between this bright but troubled author and the world of post-WWI America.


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University News
November 20, 2017
Drake alumna Betsy Hart is the first recipient of a University fellowship that offers recent art graduates one year of rent-free studio space at Des Moines' Mainframe Studios .
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