FYS 2007 Course Descriptions

FYS 002 - Starving Hysterical Naked: Constructions of Madness and Mental Illness
FYS 003 - Gender Benders and Sexed Texts
FYS 004 - I Do!....Or Do I?
FYS 005 - American Dreams/Nightmares
FYS 006 - Talking with the Enemy
FYS 007 - Mother Tongues
FYS 008 - Lost! (and Found)
FYS 009 - Me, Myself and I
FYS 010 - Writing the Environment
FYS 011 - Fraternities, Sororities, Secret Societies, and Segregation
FYS 012 - Behave Yourself: Etiquette of Writing
FYS 013 - The Loop: The Ethics of Information Sharing in the 21st Century
FYS 014 - Computers, the Internet, & You
FYS 015 - Who are You?-Topophila, Turtles, & TMI
FYS 016 - Athens on the Threshold of Democracy and India on the Eve of Independence
FYS 018 - AIDS: Anxiety to Antibodies
FYS 019 - Progressive Responses/ Globalization
FYS 020 - Masculinities in Film
FYS 022 - Diversity Includes Everyone
FYS 023 - Frontier Biology of Lewis and Clark Expedition
FYS 024 - Women and Leadership
FYS 025 - Perspectives on American Character and Society (Learning Community)
FYS 026 - Technology for Mathematics
FYS 027 - Science and Society
FYS 029 - FITness: Moving from Literacy to Fluency in a Wired World
FYS 030 - Debating America's Global Role
FYS 031 - Our (Il)legal, (A)political Lives
FYS 032 - Understanding Emotions
FYS 034 - American Racism: Language, Theory, and Behavior
FYS 035 - Religions of Des Moines
FYS 036 - Religious Conviction and Social Change
FYS 037 - All Rivers Run to the Sea...But the Sea is Never Full
FYS 038 - The Distress of Chronic Pain
FYS 040 - Shams, Scams, and Other Bargains
FYS 041 - Interpersonal Communication
FYS 042 - Perceptions of Illness: How We View the Sick
FYS 043 - Contemporary Global Issues in Context
FYS 044 - Cheaper by the Dozen
FYS 045 - Interpersonal Communications
FYS 046 - Public Policy in Education: Implications for Disenfranchised Populations
FYS 047 - Leadership, Drake, and You
FYS 048 - Life and Work in the 21st Century
FYS 049 - Intellectual Maturity and Personal Development
FYS 050 - Media Literacy: From Gutenberg to Gates

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STARVING HYSTERICAL NAKED: CONSTRUCTIONS OF MADNESS AND MENTAL ILLNESS
FYS 002
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Anzalone
CRN 1761

In this course we will compare constructions of “madness” in art, literature, and film, with case studies of the mentally ill.  For example, what does glossolalia, or speaking in tongues, sound like when spoken by a schizophrenic versus the way a poet might use it as a technique to achieve ecstatic utterance?  Do writers and artists romanticize the notion of “madness” in order to create a persona of genius, or is there truly a link between inspiration and mental illness?  Are the psychiatric labels for diseases such as manic-depression, anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder, merely another form of construction?  How might these labels be used to criticize those who pose a threat to order as deviant, and thus discredit them?  How do gender, race, and class influence these constructions?  Class requirements include: active class participation; frequent writing assignments; scholarly research; class-led discussion; presentations and other projects.  Possible works we may address include Virginia Woolf, Anthony Burgess, Sylvia Plath, John Berryman, Michel Foucault, Jacques Lacan, Sigmund Freud, Kay Redfield Jamison, Adolph Wölfli, Antonin Artaud,  Stanley Kubrick, and Francis Ford Coppola.

STARVING HYSTERICAL NAKED: CONSTRUCTIONS OF MADNESS AND MENTAL ILLNESS
FYS 002
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Anzalone
CRN 3212

Same description as listed above.

GENDER BENDERS AND SEXED TEXTS
FYS 003
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Perrine
CRN 1117 AND the film viewing lab: CRN 3045 (R 4:30-6:45pm)

Many of us take it for granted that there are only two sexes—male and female—and only two genders—masculine and feminine. This course will examine how each of these narratives of difference—one marking physiological distinctions between women and men, the other implying that they should and do behave in different ways—have been constructed in response to particular political, cultural, and economic pressures. We will consider, too, how other narratives about sex and gender—including a range of cross-dressing, gender-bending, transsexual, and intersex experiences and identities—challenge the stability of categories like “masculine” and “feminine,” “male” and “female.” In doing so, we will encounter a wide variety of texts that draw from the fields of history, literature, psychology, religion, film, biology, politics, sociology, and me icine, among others. Requirements for the class will include frequent reading, discussion, and short writing assignments; group presentations; individual “field work” that investigates assumptions about gender; and a longer writing assignment, which we will take through multiple drafts.

I DO!....OR DO I
FYS 004
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Madden
CRN 1119

Did you parents do it?  Are you going to do it?  We all know someone who has:  marriage.  American popular culture has long been fascinated, if not in love with getting married.  American politics, scholarship, literature, advertising, and entertainment have presented various, and often contradictory, views on the institution of marriage.  In this course we will analyze contemporary popular depictions of various kinds of marriages:  heterosexual union; gay and lesbian partnerships; and marriages across class, racial, and religious distinctions.  We will consider depictions of married life in short stories, novels, critical essays, film, and television shows.  As we do so we will address the following questions, among others:  Do these depictions reinforce and/or challenge conventional gender roles?  How do these depictions represent same sex partnerships?  What about inter-racial, inter-faith, and inter-class marriages?  And finally, is the concept of marriage being redefined by popular culture?  As a participant in this course you will be expected to fulfill frequent, and often extensive writing assignments; conduct scholarly research; critically read and respond to numerous texts; and participate meaningfully in class discussions.

AMERICAN DREAMS/NIGHTMARES
FYS 005
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Lubovich
CRN 3202

It seems quite appropriate to use the concept of the "American Dream" as a launching point for a first year seminar. The editors of our textbook, Creating America, stress the centrality of language and the "art of persuasion" in the workings of democracy and this nation in particular. The founding fathers had a great deal at stake in the way they constructed their very important argument, "The Declaration of Independence." Ever since, Americans have used language and persuasion to critique, inquire and define what it means (for all citizens) to be an American and dream the "American Dream." Together we will help each other explore these issues, examining a wide range of texts, including F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed: On (Not )Getting by in America. Through the course of this semester, you will learn and feel more comfortable with writing as a process (from brainstorming, free writing, drafting)-as a communal act which happens between writers. Our class time together will include a variety of activities, all of which will help make this a student-centered class. You will not be lectured to each day but instead are asked to be an active member of this learning community. We will have presentations, large and small group discussions on both reading and writing, revision workshop sessions, conferences, etc. You must be present during class time and be prepared to devote a substantial amount of time to your own learning, both in and out of class. I look forward to working with you this semester and getting to know each of you.

AMERICAN DREAMS/NIGHTMARES
FYS 005
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Lubovich
CRN 3203

It seems quite appropriate to use the concept of the "American Dream" as a launching point for a first year seminar. The editors of our textbook, Creating America, stress the centrality of language and the "art of persuasion" in the workings of democracy and this nation in particular. The founding fathers had a great deal at stake in the way they constructed their very important argument, "The Declaration of Independence." Ever since, Americans have used language and persuasion to critique, inquire and define what it means (for all citizens) to be an American and dream the "American Dream." Together we will help each other explore these issues, examining a wide range of texts, including F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed: On (Not )Getting by in America. Through the course of this semester, you will learn and feel more comfortable with writing as a process (from brainstorming, free writing, drafting)-as a communal act which happens between writers. Our class time together will include a variety of activities, all of which will help make this a student-centered class. You will not be lectured to each day but instead are asked to be an active member of this learning community. We will have presentations, large and small group discussions on both reading and writing, revision workshop sessions, conferences, etc. You must be present during class time and be prepared to devote a substantial amount of time to your own learning, both in and out of class. I look forward to working with you this semester and getting to know each of you.

TALKING WITH THE ENEMY: DIALOGUE IN AN AGE OF POLARIZATION
FYS 006
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Spaulding
CRN 1758

In a recent talk-radio interview, journalist Bill Moyers declared himself an “old-fashioned liberal” because he believes that “democracy is a conversation.” Is meaningful dialogue among people who strongly disagree no longer worth striving for?   Are Americans too polarized into single-issue factions or cultural tribes to communicate across the divide?  This course proceeds from the notion that, on the contrary, dialogue is not only possible for most of us, it is absolutely critical to our personal and national well-being.   Many Americans are working towards keeping conversation alive.

In the first part of the course we will try out and reflect on our experience with several established conversational models on selected controversial issues.  These models include the Public Conversations Project, the Utne Reader salons concept, the Listening Project of the American Friends Service Committee, the Critical Conversations program of the American Studies Crossroad Project, professional mediation, and others.   In addition, we will have the opportunity to talk with professionals and community leaders with experience in creating dialogue across difficult barriers.

In the second part of the course, students will select a current controversy to research and present to the class in the form of a dialogue model.   Working in groups, students will act as participants but also be responsible for creating and justifying a dialogue format, informing and involving the class, and reflecting on the outcome.

The last part of the course asks students to initiate a campus or community dialogue on a topic of their choice using a format of their own design.   Again working in groups, students will serve as facilitators for selected participants on two or more sides of a controversial issue.   Students will plan, promote, and present the dialogue as a public event.

Regular research, writing (analytical, reflective, and creative), speaking, video and audio work, and active involvement are the foundation of this course.

MOTHER TONGUES
FYS 007
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Arroyo
CRN 1129

Exile, migration, and the loss of languages and ways of life are both the themes and the life-conditions of writers of the 20th and 21st Century. This First Year Seminar will take a closer look at these particulars by focusing on “mother tongues”: the complexity of writing in a new language while honoring the practices, memories, and powers of a mother tongue. To this end, we’ll begin to discern how writers – like Alfred Kazin, Amy Tan, Julia Alvarez, and Edwidge Danticat – imagine, compose, express, and remember what may never be lost between languages, places, or memories. On the one hand, we’ll explore the decisions writers make to feel at home in English, and thus how their writing is composed in beautiful, elegant, and powerful terms that aspire to join, remember, or invent communities. On the other hand, we’ll investigate how family, society, selfhood, and language, as well as a form of translation and translingualism, shape their writing. Overall, we will strive to create productive relations between literacy, linguistic diversity, and the creativity necessary to compose rhetorically effective prose, while sharpening our critical skills for analysis and the making of meaning.

LOST! (AND FOUND)
FYS 008
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Norwood
CRN 3050

This Seminar will build off of the phenomenal success of the TV show Lost!  We will discuss clips of the show but most of the reading will be on related issues of what it means in today’s culture and in the past to be “lost,” either physically, spiritually or psychologically.  We will also use the concept of “lost” to start thinking about interdisciplinary knowledge.  We will spend some time with maps and orienteering equipment, we will think about “lost” as a concept, and we will look at art that celebrates finding things, or making discoveries.  We will also read about famous instances of being lost in American history, such as the Roanoke Island mystery and early Spanish explorations.  You can expect a variety of ways to think about being lost (and found) and both creative and critical writing assignments

ME, MYSELF AND I
FYS 009
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Brown
CRN 1760

In this writing-intensive class, we will investigate several key questions about selfhood. What is a self? Are people unique, individual selves? Do people “create” aspects of themselves through social interactions? What ideals of personality, character, attitude, and appearance are celebrated (and perpetuated) in American culture? Does self-help ever work? What would it mean for self-help to “work”? In other words, how can a book or a television show change someone’s life? To work on answering these questions, we will examine some theoretical and philosophical perspectives on human individuality. More importantly, we will engage with the concepts of self-definition and self-redefinition through reading memoirs (essays, possibly books) and writing autobiographical essays.

WRITING THE ENVIRONMENT
FYS 010
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Karnicky
CRN 1133

This seminar will focus on how humans live in and with the “natural” world. We will consider the following questions, among others: How and why is the environment valued in writing? How do humans interact with other species? How do science, history and politics intersect in environmental literature? We will read fiction and nonfiction by such writers as Nathaniel Hawthorne, John James Audubon, Rachel Carson, and others.  We will also watch a couple of films. Students are expected to participate in class discussion, and to complete a number of writing assignments over the course of the semester.

FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES, SECRET SOCIETIES, AND SEGREGATION
FYS 011
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Chishty-Mujahid
CRN 1729

Secret societies have always intrigued those who are fascinated by their inherent mystery, or purported claims concerning mystery. Ever since the conception of the fraternities of the "Virginia Circle" in the mid-1800s, Greek life has gained strength and popularity across US campuses. Yet the "work hard, play hard lifestyle" has attracted no small amount of criticism, as indicated by texts as diverse as Brad Land's anguished, semi-autobiographical Goat, and Hank Nuwer's Wrongs of Passage. These texts and others will provide a focal point for a series of discussions including, but definitely not limited to, the question/s of 1) why Greek life persists and thrives in spite of its numerous detractors; 2) whether attempts to integrate alternative lifestyles with Greek life (such as the famous Lambda 10 project) are promising or sadly futile; 3) whether segregation in Greek life promotes, or eradicates, diversity; and 4) whether the beauty and depth of brotherhood and sisterhood are consistently, and perhaps irrevocably, compromised by the undercurrents of ambition, perfectionism, and psychosocial struggles that persist in the majority of Greek systems. Your writing will be shaped by our discussions, but one of the main purposes of this seminar is to enable you to develop your own critical voice regarding these complex, controversial, and ultimately open-ended, issues.

FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES, SECRET SOCIETIES, AND SEGREGATION
FYS 011
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Chishty-Mujahid
CRN 1733

Secret societies have always intrigued those who are fascinated by their inherent mystery, or purported claims concerning mystery. Ever since the conception of the fraternities of the "Virginia Circle" in the mid-1800s, Greek life has gained strength and popularity across US campuses. Yet the "work hard, play hard lifestyle" has attracted no small amount of criticism, as indicated by texts as diverse as Brad Land's anguished, semi-autobiographical Goat, and Hank Nuwer's Wrongs of Passage. These texts and others will provide a focal point for a series of discussions including, but definitely not limited to, the question/s of 1) why Greek life persists and thrives in spite of its numerous detractors; 2) whether attempts to integrate alternative lifestyles with Greek life (such as the famous Lambda 10 project) are promising or sadly futile; 3) whether segregation in Greek life promotes, or eradicates, diversity; and 4) whether the beauty and depth of brotherhood and sisterhood are consistently, and perhaps irrevocably, compromised by the undercurrents of ambition, perfectionism, and psychosocial struggles that persist in the majority of Greek systems. Your writing will be shaped by our discussions, but one of the main purposes of this seminar is to enable you to develop your own critical voice regarding these complex, controversial, and ultimately open-ended, issues.

BEHAVE YOURSELF: ETIQUETTE OF WRITING
FYS 012
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Owens
CRN 3047

Participants in this course will explore the relationship between what has traditionally been considered "good" writing and what has traditionally been considered "good" behavior. We will investigate the social and cultural forces that shape the values that inform both notions of "good"; we will observe these principles in action, both in the texts we read and the everyday behaviors we see around us; and we will deploy our collective experiences and insights to formulate an Etiquette Guide that addresses the social codes and demands of First-Year Living on the Drake University campus. Instead of trying to teach you a set of universal principles for good writing, this course will give you the experience necessary for you to recognize how societies, disciplines, and institutions (like businesses or universities) arrive at and establish the values that shape what we consider to be "good" writing. Thus, your writing will be primarily about writing. And about etiquette. Because rules of etiquette evolve, take hold, and get used similar to the ways rules of writing do, etiquette will serve as an analog for writing: it is a social habit, it is used as a means of representation, and it helps (or hinders) people's efforts to interpret and understand individuals around them.  Moreover, we'll see that there is a great deal of overlap between what is considered "polite" in behavior and what is considered "correct" in language.

THE LOOP: THE ETHICS OF INFORMATION SHARING IN THE 21st CENTURY
FYS 013
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Djenno
CRN 2122

This seminar will consider the current role that information technology is playing in transforming our lives, and its likely role in the coming decade. The ways we think about the world, earn our living, gain education, function as members of society and spend our leisure time will undergo profound change. We cannot predict accurately the ways information technology will develop, or what will happen as a result of those developments. But we can become more informed about the important technologies, issues and trends, as we share ideas. The course format will consist of readings and research (both library and Internet-based), classroom discussions and student presentations, and brief lectures when needed to provide a foundation for your research. There will also be an emphasis on writing essays on topics arising from discussions and your research. We will be using basic computer software (web browser, MS Word and PowerPoint, discussion boards, email) but there will be no need for skills in programming, web authoring, etc.

COMPUTERS, THE INTERNET, & YOU
FYS 014
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Morris
CRN 2935

This seminar will consider the current role that computers are playing in transforming our lives, and their likely role in the coming decade.  The ways we think about the world, become educated, earn our living, function as members of society and spend our leisure time will undergo profound change because of technology.  We cannot predict accurately the ways information technology will develop, or what will happen as a result of those developments. But we can become more informed about the potential uses of computers, and the technological trends.  Even more important are the social and ethical issues, arising now and in the future, which will be discussed in the seminar.

The course format will consist of classroom discussions and student presentations, readings and research (both library and web-based), and brief lectures when needed to provide a foundation for your research. There will be an emphasis on group work, which will often be necessary to gather information and shape it into ideas.  There will also be an emphasis on writing essays on topics arising from discussions and your research.  We will be using basic computer software (a web browser, MS Word, discussion boards, email, etc.) but there will be no programming or web authoring.

WHO ARE YOU? - TOPOPHILA, TURTLES, & TMI
FYS 015
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Schneider, Christine
CRN 2952

This First Year Seminar is a CSI (Credible Self Investigation). It uses three investigative tools—topophilia (the love of place), Neuro-Linguistic Programming (the study of excellence along with models of how individuals structure their experiences), and the availability of Too Much Information to answer the CSI theme song’s question --"Who Are You?"

DEBATING DEMOCRACY: ATHENS ON THE THRESHOLD OF DEMOCRACY AND INDIA ON THE EVE OF INDEPENDENCE
FYS 016
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Robertson
CRN 2082

This course will be taught using a pedagogy known as "Reacting to the Past." Students will read major texts from the period, research the backgrounds and then reenact the historical context in which ideas acquired significance and seek to reach their own decisions on basic questions of political and social order. Thus a student might play the part of a supporter of Socrates in the Athens Assembly and speak from that perspective. The same student might enact Nehru's position in debates of the Indian National Congress. Preparation for each "game" will involve much reading and writing; the games themselves demand that students speak publicly in the assembly, argue and debate their character's ideas, and respond to the ideas and arguments of others. Among other things, we will consider the nature of democracy, how it is formed, how multiple political and cultural contexts determine its practice, and we'll examine the relationship of the philosophical, theoretical and literary ideas that inform the concepts of democracy to the realities of its political practice.

AIDS: ANXIETY TO ANTIBODIES
FYS 018
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Senchina
CRN 2955

As a general rule, most first–year college students have a great level of respect for “science,” not realizing that the very story of AIDS demonstrates more accurately the “doing of science” than the “dogma of science.”  As the course unfolds with the history of the AIDS epidemic, it will become apparent that many ideas about the disease were initially wrong and had to be discarded or revised.  Thus, the sense of science as a permanent, unchanging collection of facts is quickly debunked.  HIV helped us understand that the central theory of the flow of genetic information needed revising.  No longer could the central dogma be that genetic information flowed from DNA to RNA to protein, not when HIV replicated via RNA to DNA to RNA to protein.  Science is, rather, a dynamic collection of tested hypotheses that are always under revision and subject to the next discovery.

Science can inform our thinking, but it cannot solve our problems, especially in the case of AIDS. AIDS threatened our sense of security in modern medicine.  Biology and medicine can explain the disease, its transmission, even its treatment, but AIDS, as we have come to know it, is far beyond the boundaries of mere science.  Science is unable to make an effective vaccine.  Science cannot address the hotly contested issues of ethical treatment, or the value of needle exchange programs.  Neither can it provide equal access to treatment, or deal with irrational reactions and fears.

In this course we will explore the tapestry of AIDS as we weave the biological and medical with social, psychological, economic, legal, political, and geographical issues of a disease which has had more manpower and money poured into its research than any other disease in history.


PROGRESSIVE RESPONSES/ GLOBALIZATION
FYS 019
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Vandegrift
CRN 2942

Whether the arena be culture, economics, or politics, everyday people throughout the world find their lives influenced increasingly by institutions, practices, and ideologies originating far beyond the borders of their own nation-state.  Progressive thinkers are concerned with decentralized democracy, sustaining environmental balances, and creating global connections across people's movements.  At the same time, progressive perspectives draw on discourses that can sometimes be critiqued as nostalgic and elitist.  This course examines the progressive "globalization from below" perspective through a critical yet sympathetic lens.  In all aspects of the course, the instructor will emphasize personal connections with and impacts of globalization.

Students will look at the implications of globalization on their lives as citizens, consumers and workers.  Some ideas to be considered include Benjamin Barber's idea of global interdependence day, Naomi Klein's analysis of the corporate privatization of the public commons, Carlo Petrini's grassroots slow food movement, and Samuel Huntington's theory of "the clash of civilizations" (a conservative perspective) and progressive responses to Huntington.  We will also look at the future of identity in a globalized era and local activism around the politics and environmental issues surrounding globalized agriculture. This course encourages students to use principles of sustainable living and mindfulness in their work and study habits as well as their consumer habits.  We will integrate the ideas of personal agency and wellness with those of global citizenship and community wellness.

MASCULINITIES IN FILM
FYS 020
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Schneider, Joseph
CRN 1833

AND enrollment in one of the following film viewing labs:
CRN 1879  (M 7:00-9:30 pm);
CRN 1880  (T 7:00-9:30 pm)

This course asks students to view, discuss, and write about roughly 14 popular films as a way to consider and think critically about masculinity and gender in society.  Additional readings supplement this work.  The aim is to think in new ways about what it has meant and means to "be a man" (and a woman) in North American culture.  Readings are drawn from a range of disciplines, but primarily from cultural studies, film studies, sociology, and gender studies.  Students are required to lead weekly discussions of these films and to write short papers that draw aspects of the films and readings together.  Students are expected to choose one film lab for viewing the films each week and attend two class meetings a week. 

DIVERSITY INCLUDES EVERYONE
FYS 022
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Breakenridge
CRN 1924

As globalization increases, our population is becoming more diverse. Do you have an understanding of other cultures and customs? Do you know if you have any hidden bias? How would you react to being discriminated against based on your race, gender, or age? This course will focus on the different points of diversity (race, ethnicity, religion, culture, gender, sexual orientation, age, etc) AND will promote tolerance. Students will be introduced to guest speakers representing diverse population for the purpose of interaction and discussion. Students will be expected to fulfill frequent writing assignments; read and respond to scholarly research; and participate in class discussions.

DIVERSITY INCLUDES EVERYONE
FYS 022
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Breakenridge
CRN 3200

Same description as listed above.

FRONTIER BIOLOGY OF LEWIS AND CLARK EXPEDITION
FYS 023
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Wacha
CRN 2110

Learn about the scientific discoveries of the Lewis and Clark expedition the bicentennial celebration of this historic journey (1804 - 1806).  The objectives of the course are to examine the numerous plants and animals reported by the Lewis and Clark expedition and to consider the medical and nutritional problems experienced by the expedition members. The health of the Native Americans, through whose lands the expedition traveled, is also considered, as well as the interactions of the expedition with the Native American societies it encountered.  Issues that form a basis for discussion in the class, which relate to these objectives include:

1. the scientific background of President Thomas Jefferson as a precondition for determining the scientific objectives of the expedition

2. the nature and value of the scientific training received by Lewis and Clark prior to their journey

3. the role of the early American physician Dr. Benjamin Rush in preparing the expedition for medical eventualities, and the status of medical treatment in the early 1800's

4. the military nature of the expedition in relationship to the expedition's scientific success

5. the current status of the plants collected by the expedition, now being housed at the Philadelphia Academy of Sciences

6. the usefulness of the knowledge gained by the expedition as a historic database for assessing the pre-settlement conditions of our western continental landscape

7. Jefferson's concern with "environmental" issues of his time and parallels with today's views.

8. The expedition as a microcosm of American society in the early 1800's.


FRONTIER BIOLOGY OF LEWIS AND CLARK EXPEDITION
FYS 023
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Wacha
CRN 2109

Same description as listed above.

WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP
FYS 024
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Pollack
CRN 2269

Eleanor Roosevelt once said, "Women are like tea bags.  We don't know our true strength until we're in hot water!"  What characteristics, if any, make women distinctive as leaders?  Do women have different ways of leading?  How do stereotypes and historical influences work for or against women in leadership roles?  What is the future of women as leaders in our culture?  This seminar will analyze the influence of gender on the theory and practice of leadership.  Participants will be encouraged to critically examine their own philosophy of leadership, as well as mainstream leadership theories from the perspective of gender through weekly reflection papers, readings, guest speakers, service learning, oral presentations and group discussion of current issues and trends.   

PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICAN CHARACTER AND SOCIETY (LEARNING COMMUNITY)
FYS 025
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Lewis
CRN 1163

AND students will concurrently enroll in POLS 001 (Sanders), TR 12:30-1:45 pm

What are the "habits of the heart" that move Americans, the beliefs and practices that shape the character of its citizens and give form to the American social order?  Beginning with de Tocqueville and continuing through Bellah et al., numerous observers have developed analyses that suggest political equality and individualism are fundamental traits of American culture.  In Democracy in America, Volume II , Tocqueville argues that "Democracy has destroyed or modified the old relations of men to one another and has established new ones."  How is this new social order doing in the early 21st Century?  In 1985, during the height of the Ronald Reagan era, Bellah et al. published Habits of the Heart:  Individualism and Commitment in American Life.  In the preface, they wrote:  The central problem of our book concerns the American individualism that Tocqueville described with a mixture of admiration and anxiety.  It seems to us that it is individualism, and not equality, as Tocqueville thought, that has marched inexorably through our history.  We are concerned that this individualism may have grown cancerous--that it may be destroying those social instruments that Tocqueville saw as moderating its more destructive potentialities, that it may be threatening the survival of freedom itself.  Bellah et al. are raising the question of "community" in the United States. And since they wrote their book 21 years ago, the growing diversity and seeming fragmentation of American society has made their concerns even more compelling. Is it possible for community to exist in a society that emphasizes radical individualism?  What are the individual's responsibilities to fellow citizens, to his/her city, state, or nation?  These and other questions will be explored in this course.

Students who register for Perspectives in American Character and Society must also register for POLS 001 (Sanders) The American Political System, taught by Professor Arthur Sanders.   Professors McAlister, Sanders, and Lewis will coordinate course readings and assignments to tie together themes developed in the two classes.  Students signing up will also be housed on the same floor in a residence hall. 

PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICAN CHARACTER AND SOCIETY (LEARNING COMMUNITY)
FYS 025
MW 12:30-1:45 pm 
McAlister
CRN 1166 AND students will concurrently enroll in POLS 001 (Sanders), TR 12:30-1:45 pm

What are the "habits of the heart" that move Americans, the beliefs and practices that shape the character of its citizens and give form to the American social order?  Beginning with de Tocqueville and continuing through Bellah et al., numerous observers have developed analyses that suggest political equality and individualism are fundamental traits of American culture.  In Democracy in America, Volume II , Tocqueville argues that "Democracy" has destroyed or modified the old relations of men to one another and has established new ones."  How is this new social order doing in the early 21st Century?  In 1985, during the height of the Ronald Reagan era, Bellah et al. published Habits of the Heart:  Individualism and Commitment in American Life.  In the preface, they wrote:  "The central problem of our book concerns the American individualism that Tocqueville described with a mixture of admiration and anxiety.  It seems to us that it is individualism, and not equality, as Tocqueville thought, that has marched inexorably through our history.  We are concerned that this individualism may have grown cancerous--that it may be destroying those social instruments that Tocqueville saw as moderating its more destructive potentialities, that it may be threatening the survival of freedom itself."  Bellah et al. are raising the question of "community" in the United States. And since they wrote their book 21 years ago, the growing diversity and seeming fragmentation of American society has made their concerns even more compelling. Is it possible for community to exist in a society that emphasizes radical individualism?  What are the individual's responsibilities to fellow citizens, to his/her city, state, or nation?  These and other questions will be explored in this course.

Students who register for Perspectives in American Character and Society must also register for POLS 001 (Sanders) The American Political System, taught by Professor Arthur Sanders.   Professors McAlister, Sanders, and Lewis will coordinate course readings assignments to tie together themes developed in the two classes.  Students signing up will also be housed on the same floor in a residence hall.

TECHNOLOGY FOR MATHEMATICS
FYS 026
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
DeAlba
CRN 2929

The goals of this FYS are to introduce students to a wide variety of technology resources useful in the analysis and communication of mathematics. Specifically, the pedagogy will seek to advance students' knowledge of Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word, Geometer's Sketchpad, Mathematica, and Maple, and to improve their writing skills. If time permits, an additional unit on mathematics typesetting with Latex will be introduced. The use of this technology will be based on basic mathematical topics, and will seek to promote critical thinking. The use of computer technology will allow students to experiment, and to communicate mathematics effectively.

SCIENCE AND SOCIETY
FYS 027
MW 12:30 - 1:45 pm
Cairns
CRN 2231

This course explores current and past controversies in the sciences. In the process of looking at some (in)famous examples of scientific achievements we will explore the following questions:

  • What do we mean by ‘science’ anyway? 
  • What are the differences between science and pseudoscience, and between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ science? 
  • How does science ‘work?’ 
  • Could we do science better? 
  • What of the future of science?


We will use a case study approach. Also, where possible, we’ll use the primary literature to see how science is reported by scientists to other scientists.

FITness: MOVING FROM LITERACY TO FLUENCY IN A WIRED WORLD
FYS 029
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Steinbronn
CRN 3159


Are you digitally literate or digitally fluent? What is the difference and why should it matter? What is your FITness level? FITness requires that persons understand information technology broadly enough to be able to apply it productively at work and in their everyday lives, to recognize when information technology would assist or impede the achievement of a goal, and to continually adapt to the changes in and advancement of information technology.

This course will explore the meaning of digital literacy and making the transition to becoming digital fluent in a wired world. Students will

• investigate the creative and expressive applications of information and communication technology

• establish patterns and adaptation to technological change

• explore the importance of access and Internet use to the digital divide.

DEBATING AMERICA'S GLOBAL ROLE
FYS 030
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Skidmore, David
CRN 3170

When should the United States use force in pursuit of its foreign policy goals? Should the U.S. act unilaterally or only in cooperation with other nations? Is the promotion of democracy abroad a legitimate foreign policy objective? Should Americans embrace globalization or seek to tame the forces of global economic integration? These are among the many difficult questions that Americans will be challenged to ponder as foreign policy issues promise to play an important role in the coming presidential election contest. With the aid of a series of visiting foreign policy experts, this FYS will examine the debate over America's global role.

OUR (IL)LEGAL, (A)POLITICAL LIVES
FYS 031
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Cramer
CRN 3214

Many scholars would argue that our lives are always affected by, and in interaction with, law!  Many would also agree that humans are by nature social, and political.  Yet, though we may indeed live our lives “in the shadow of law,” and though political ads and debates seem to saturate the media – many of us don’t experience ourselves as especially political, or too wrapped up in the law.   Rather, we denigrate politics as, well, “too political,” and our only interactions with the law tend to be when we get caught breaking it!

Is this avoidance of law and politics a productive way to be citizens?  How can we come to better understand ourselves as political actors?  How can we frame our interactions with law and the legal system?

This first year seminar will use biographies, autobiographies, essays, and documentary films to explore the interaction of individuals with the legal and political institutions of the United States.  Students will read, hear, and see the personal stories of some Americans populating, and affected by, those institutions, both historically and in contemporary culture.  We will read work by, and about: Benjamin Franklin, Henry David Thoreau, Barack Obama, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Patricia Williams, as well as several others who have opposed particular laws, engaged in political protest, and/or successfully shaped politics and law to their own vision.

Students will write two short reading analyses, and complete three longer project papers.  The culmination of the course will be a narrative of your own political and legal memories, aspirations, and beliefs.   By the end of the course, it is my hope that you will have an understanding of how your own life is affected by and in interaction with law and politics, and that you have begun to imagine a productive way of engaging in legal and political life.

UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONS
FYS 032
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Lepper
CRN 3198

Rage, sadness, fear, elation, love, hate – it is hard to imagine life without felt and expressed emotion. While emotions can be both fulfilling and baffling, emotions are extremely important to our lives as human beings. Throughout history, philosophers, artists, and scientists have attempted to understand and depict emotions. This FYS will begin with an overview of the historical roots to the study of emotion and end with an overview of disorder of emotion. In between the beginning and end, we will look at contemporary research into the brain, the nervous system, and the psychosociocultural development of emotion. Throughout the semester we will be thinking about how our beliefs and values are related to our emotions, why different people have different emotional responses to the same events, why we respond emotionally to works of art like poetry, music, films and paintings, and what goes on in the brain when we feel the emotions, and whether, and if so how, scientists and philosophers can explain our emotions.

AMERICAN RACISM:  LANGUAGE, THEORY, AND BEHAVIOR
FYS 034
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Hill
CRN 3201

This course will offer students an opportunity to examine the history, and culture of what has been euphemistically described as "race relations" in American culture.  Students will be challenged to consider their personal beliefs and prior education regarding the role of race and the legacies of slavery in shaping both American cultural attitudes and behavior. During this seminar students will interrogate language, ideas, and concepts that often influence collective and individual behavior within cultural frameworks defined by Racial exclusion (White and Everyone Else theory).

Why, for example, does the Office of Management and Budget and the Census Bureau persist in categorizing Americans by race? What does race really mean and how does it influence our individual and collective behavior? What does "Teaching Tolerance" suggest? Why is our visual media and colloquial language dominated by racial stereotypes and metaphors? Why does race "sell"? Why do we persist in dividing human beings by race? Why not a single-race theory? Why do
we persist in promoting dominant-subordinate imagery? What are some of the keys to understanding one another at a human level (outside the limiting boundaries of Race)?
 
Students will address visual and written texts that identify and interrogate these questions. We will question whether and why American slavery serves as the basis for a number of lasting perceptions and presumptions about Black (African) Americans within American culture.  Examples include texts from the American slave experience, both from slaves and slave holders, contemporary television advertisements, newsreels and footage from the American Civil Rights Era, as well as the instructor's own oral history collection and lived experience.

RELIGIONS OF DES MOINES
FYS 035
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Knepper
CRN 2938

This first year seminar will introduce students to several of the world’s religions through an exploration of religious diversity in Drake’s own “backyard.”  Among the religions to be considered include Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Islam, Judaism, and Eastern Orthodox Christianity, all of which possess vibrant religious communities in the greater Des Moines area.  Exploration of these communities will utilize a variety of methods, including site visits, guest lectures, interreligious dialogues, and readings.  Emphasis will placed be on the current beliefs and practices of these communities, i.e., not on the historical development of these religions.

RELIGIOUS CONVICTION AND SOCIAL CHANGE
FYS 036
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Harvey
CRN 3199

Some of our most important movements for social change in the United States--the abolition of slavery, the fight against poverty, the Civil Rights Movement--have been fueled by the religious convictions of faith communities.  In this course we will study a variety of social change movements and the religious visions that both sustained and resisted them. Throughout the course, we will explore questions about what role(s) religious convictions play and should play in our civic life.

RELIGIOUS CONVICTION AND SOCIAL CHANGE
FYS 036
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
CRN 1336

Same description as listed above.

"ALL RIVERS RUN TO THE SEA...BUT THE SEA IS NEVER FULL"
FYS 037
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Laurenzo
CRN 2193

Our work in this FYS will center around intense discussion, research and application of ideas relating to the wisdom literature of the Bible.  This literature offers a wide perspective on ourselves as human beings, our world as created and (in part) being created by us, and God. The book of Ecclesiastes calls us to question and reflect and even challenge.  The book of Psalms has been called the world's greatest prayer book.  The book of Proverbs offers a worldly wisdom that often surprises.  And Job's long debate urges us to ask and discover life's meaning.  Crucial to all these biblical texts is our interpretation and application of them.  This course is intended for students who (e.g., the Jacob story in Genesis) can learn to struggle with the text through critical reading, researching, and application of these important ideas.

THE DISTRESS OF CHRONIC PAIN
FYS 038
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Rospond
CRN 1916

Pain is one of the most common manifestations of a disease process. Although the multitude of acute aches and pain are easily treated and resolved, chronic pain is an entity that has a life of it's own. In recent years, chronic pain has become more a part of our social construct as a result of several ethical and legal controversies. An understanding of chronic pain from the view of the sufferer is vital to our improving the management of this extremely prevalent condition. This course will expose the student to individual, family and societal impacts of chronic pain utilizing various forms of media and through an examination of current events.

SHAMS, SCAMS, AND OTHER BARGAINS
FYS 040
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Finn
CRN 1891

We are constantly bombarded with offers that seem too good to neglect. Do people really accept these offers? Will we lose if we accept these offers? Are these merely innocent offers? Why are we receiving these offers? Are these offers legitimate or are they scams? This class will answer these questions and many more.

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
FYS 041
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Blum
CRN 2345

What price would you pay for a great personal and professional life?  Ask the successful CEOs of major corporations what characteristic is most needed for success in leadership positions, and they will tell you it is the ability to work with people.  Interview men or women in happy marriages about what makes for successful marriage and they will tell you it is the ability to understand and communicate with each other.  Talk to top salespeople and they will tell you that people knowledge is much more important than mere product knowledge.  Sit down with teachers, shop foremen, small business owners, pastors and parents, and they'll tell you that people skills make the difference between those who excel and those who don't.  People skills are invaluable.  It doesn't matter what you want to do.  If you can win with people, you can be successful and happy!

Practical and warmly personal, this course helps you develop the skills you need to interact with others in today's complex society.  You will learn methods to understand yourself better, techniques to learn how others view the world, and practical activities to improve the quality of every interpersonal encounter.  Some believe the skill of developing great interpersonal relationships cannot be learned.  But this course will prove quite the opposite.  Every student will leave this course more eager and better equipped to develop positive relationships that will improve their personal and professional lives well into the future.

PERCEPTIONS OF ILLNESS: HOW WE VIEW THE SICK
FYS 042
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Rovers
CRN 1670

This course is intended for all majors, not just health science majors.  In this course you will learn to:

  • Distinguish between various methods used to describe the sick and the healthy and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.
  • Discuss what society wants from the sick and what the sick want from society.
  • Articulate your personal response to disease and understand why you had the response you did.
  • Decide whether or not you believe that the common metaphors for disease are or are not useful constructs for both patients and providers.
  • Reach a personal conclusion for how you believe the "science" part of health care is best related to the "care" part of health care.

CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES IN CONTEXT
FYS 043
MW  12:30-1:45 p.m.
Hogan
CRN 3209

This course aims to engage students in a dialogue of current global events through researching various media sources including foreign newspapers, the Internet and other international publications.  Students will have the opportunity to research and report upon issues and events in a country of their choice.  Countries excluded from consideration include North American and Western European countries.  Each week students will write a brief summary of a current event in their country or an update on an ongoing issue.   Students will be expected to talk about what they have learned in their readings and how the event or issue affects other countries and also how it affects the United States.

CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN
FYS 044
TR 12:30-1:45 pm
Bishop
CRN 1744

What does it mean to be an entrepreneur? Does just anyone have what it takes to be successful as an entrepreneur? Does it require creativity, imagination, drive, luck, or some other talents? We will investigate the ups and downs in the lives of some past and present entrepreneurs.  Using various methods such as readings, video, research and observation we will consider people such as Henry Ford, Frank and Lillian Gillbreth (the book Cheaper by the Dozen is based on their life) Walt Disney, Bill Gates and others. We will try and discover if there is an entrepreneur inside each of us.

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
FYS 045
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Blum
CRN 2336

What price would you pay for a great personal and professional life?  Ask the successful CEOs of major corporations what characteristic is most needed for success in leadership positions, and they will tell you it is the ability to work with people.  Interview men or women in happy marriages about what makes for successful marriage and they will tell you it is the ability to understand and communicate with each other.  Talk to top salespeople and they will tell you that people knowledge is much more important than mere product knowledge.  Sit down with teachers, shop foremen, small business owners, pastors and parents, and they'll tell you that people skills make the difference between those who excel and those who don't.  People skills are invaluable.  It doesn't matter what you want to do.  If you can win with people, you can be successful and happy!

Practical and warmly personal, this course helps you develop the skills you need to interact with others in today's complex society.  You will learn methods to understand yourself better, techniques to learn how others view the world, and practical activities to improve the quality of every interpersonal encounter.  Some believe the skill of developing great interpersonal relationships cannot be learned.  But this course will prove quite the opposite.  Every student will leave this course more eager and better equipped to develop positive relationships that will improve their personal and professional lives well into the future.

PUBLIC POLICY IN EDUCATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR DISENFRANCHISED POPULATIONS
FYS 046
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Boon
CRN 3213

The rise of the American educational system has been a key factor making this country the economic success it is today, and it also has had many implications for the social fabric of the country.  Education has not always been a right for all citizens, and policies set at the federal and state level have structured the inclusiveness of the system for disenfranchised groups such as women, African Americans, Native Americans, and the disabled in varied ways.

This course will explore the ways in which American education policy and the American educational system have had an impact on these different populations over the last 200 years.  While the focus will be on K-12 education, many policies also have implications for higher education, and this too will merit some discussion. 

Course goals include the following:

  • Students will gain an understanding of the history of the educational system in America and the way public policies impact who gains entry
  • Students will think and write critically about the intersection of government, education, and society
  • Students will gain skills in researching government documents and reviewing existing research for public policy information and analysis
  • Students will gain or improve upon the skills of working with a group and giving a presentation


Student outcomes will be measured through the following:

  • Attendance and class participation (there will be a great deal of discussion and group work in this course)
  • Short response papers:  at several points in the semester students will be asked to write 2-3 page analyses of relevant issues from course readings, class discussions, or media sources.
  • Long-paper:  around mid-terms, students will write a 12-15 page paper on a topic to be determined.  This paper will provide evidence of critical thinking skills.
  • Group project: this will be the final graded element of the semester.  Groups of 3-4 students will research and present to the class information on the formation, implementation, and impact of a policy on a particular sector of education or population of people.  Projects can focus on K-12 or higher education policies.

LEADERSHIP, DRAKE, AND YOU
FYS 047
TR  12:30-1:45 pm
Bakari
CRN 1736

This seminar is about a leadership process that can be learned with discipline and practice.  Increasingly, successful leadership is less hierarchical and authoritative and more based on a process of inclusiveness and empowerment. The leader's position or status matters less than the working relationship and team s/he is able to cultivate. Students will explore traditional and contemporary leadership theories and models, and articulate the difference between leadership and management.  Students will construct a personal vision through awareness of self and others, teamwork, integrity, group dynamics, and campus involvement, inclusive leadership and community service.  They will also be asked to communicate their powerful vision in the context of working effectively with others in a culturally diverse and complex changing world.

A particular writing and presentation focus for the seminar will be to research a female leader from a social movement, national political party, health and human services, education, spirituality or business, and reflect on the context in which the individual rose to leadership, the individual's leadership approach/style, and lessons students can learn about leadership from this individual.  A second focus of writing will be on the impact of key events that have shaped and influenced her/his own leadership experiences such as critical incidents, individuals, role models, mentors, or travel experiences.

LIFE AND WORK IN THE 21ST CENTURY
FYS 048
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Westbrook
CRN 1369

This FYS will examine the demographic, social, and technological changes predicted to occur in the first half of the 21st century. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding the impact of these changes on one's life and career. We will achieve this through readings, discussion, group projects, presentations, and critiquing videos. The goal of this course is to better understand our role as global citizens as we examine the competencies needed to be competitive in the 21st century.

INTELLECTUAL MATURITY AND PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
FYS 049
MW  12:30-1:45 pm
Everage
CRN 1362

In this seminar, intellectual (cognitive) development and psychosocial theories provide the context for examining the many  challenges students encounter during their years in college. Academic and social aspects of the collegiate experience affect the changes and choices associated with intellectual and personal development. Students will review the literature and relate research findings to their current learning environment, particularly salient will be the first-year experience. The readings, class discussions, writing assignments, and attendance at selected campus events will reflect an emphasis on critical thinking.  Students will also examine the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and explore the influence and interrelationship between intrinsic motivation and quality of effort relative to the academic experience.

MEDIA LITERACY: FROM GUTENBERG TO GATES
FYS 050
MW 12:30-1:45 pm
Wade
CRN 3168

This seminar will explore the development of the mass media, concentrating on popular culture's interaction with its audience through historical, social, political, and technological advances from Johann Gutenberg (the reputed inventor of the printing press) to Bill Gates (Microsoft, Inc.)

Students will learn to effectively and efficiently interpret and deliver media messages from a cultural perspective, increasing understanding of the mass communication process.  The course seeks to help students become more skilled and knowledgeable consumers of media content.

Today at Drake
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM
University News
December 7, 2016
President-elect Donald J. Trump has selected Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, a 1974 alumnus of Drake University Law School, to serve as ambassador to China.
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