Courses

Spring 17 English Offering

Schedule of Drake classes can be found at https://oias2.drake.edu/pls/PROD/bwckschd.p_disp_dyn_sched

ENG 001: SEMINAR IN READING & WRITING, 3 credit hrs.
A course in writing and reading as interdependent activities stimulating intellectual inquiry and growth. Emphasis on intensive critical engagement with texts through writing will encourage students to interact with ideas in the texts to develop their own interpretations, and to become aware of how language use in different discourses shapes and constrains meaning. Activities include frequent writing and class discussion of papers. Offered only when crosslisted with First-Year Seminar.

ENG 020: LITERATURE & CULTURE, 3 credit hrs.
This course provides an introduction to literature as a significant form of culture. Students read a broad range of writers and types of writing from a variety of historical periods to investigate how literature shapes, and is shaped by, the culture of which it is a part and to become familiar with different literary practices and cultural definitions of literature.

ENG 030: GENRES, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of the history, criticism, theory and status of a single genre, such as the essay, epic, romance,short story, sitcom, and so on. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies. Intended especially for first- and second-year students.

ENG 038: LITERARY STUDY, 3 credit hrs.
This course introduces students to the theories and processes of literary study--that is, to the problems, questions and issues that constitute literary study as a critical activity and as a profession. Students examine such areas of inquiry as literature's definition, function, and value; the authority of authors, readers, critics and texts; the "nature" of texts; and the problem of situating both the text and the reader in history, society and culture. Required for English and Writing majors and minors.

ENG 039: WRITING SEMINAR, 3 credit hrs.
This is a topics-oriented course, concerned with theoretical issues that confront writers and the practical ways in which those issues are addressed. The course is designed to help students become more fully aware of what assumptions govern their own and others' writings, of how writing works cognitively to contribute to intellectual growth, of ways of reading writing culturally and rhetorically. Required for all English and Writing majors, this course is open to all students with a serious interest in writing.

ENG 040: TOPICS IN LITERARY HISTORY, 3 credit hrs.
This course will introduce students to a question or set of questions germane to the study of language and literature propoduced before 1900.

ENG 041: INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDY, 3 credit hrs.
Critical approaches to film study, emphasizing the development of film as both an art form and cultural practice, and based on analysis of at least a dozen film texts. Viewing lab required. 

ENG 042: APPROACHES TO AMERICAN LITERATURE (BEFORE 1900), 3 credit hrs.
Students will read poetry, prose, and/or drama composed before 1900, becoming familiar with a variety of approaches to interpreting how such texts represent the cultures of the Americas. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 044: APPROACH TO BRITISH LITERATURE (BEFORE 1900), 3 credit hrs.
Students will read British poetry, prose, and/or plays composed prior to 1900, becoming familiar with a variety of approaches to interpreting how such texts represent British and/or colonial culture and identity. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 054: READING DRAMA, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course gain experience reading a variety of dramatic texts and writing about their reading by engaging in questions related to form, genre, performance, history and culture. Typically the course focuses on a dramatic kind, like comedy or tragedy, or on an issue (representing women) or character type.

ENG 056: THE CLASSIC THEN & NOW, 3 credit hrs.
"What is a Classic?" By reading selected "classic" texts against the critical commentary on them from two (or more) historical periods and/or cultures, students in this course consider whether the "classic" owes its status to universal literary appeal or to transient critical taste.

ENG 058: READING SHAKESPEARE, 3 credit hrs.
What do we need to know in order to read a 400-year-old writer? Does it matter that that writer never expected to read? How did his contemporaries see him? How have others at other times read and seen him? How do we read/see him? And what exactly are we "reading" when we read "Shakespeare"? By examining a limited number of plays with specified contexts, students confront some of the conventions of reading/seeing Shakespearean playtexts and gain acquaintance with various mechanisms (curricula, performance history, literary criticism, popular culture) that operate to shape "Shakespeare."

ENG 060: TOPICS IN CULTURE & IDENTITY, 3 credit hrs.
This course will introduce students to a particular question or set of questions concerning the construction, representation, depiction, and/or interpretation of cultural, ethnic, national, racial, or other forms of identity.

ENG 061: APPROACHES TO AMERICAN LITERATURE (AFTER 1900), 3 credit hrs.
Students will read poetry, prose, and/or drama composed after 1900, becoming familiar with a variety of approaches to interpreting how such texts represent the cultures of the Americas. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 062: APPROACHES TO BRITISH LITERATURE (AFTER 1900), 3 credit hrs.
Students will read poetry, prose, and/or drama composed after 1900, becoming familiar with a variety of approaches to interpreting how such texts represent the cultures of the British Isles and colonies. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 063: AMERICAN WRITING SINCE 1960, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of significant trends in American writing from 1960 to the present in prose fiction, poetry and non-fiction prose.

ENG 065: INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
This course introduces students to issues in African American studies. It is a multidisciplinary course in which key statements by African Americans--including scholarly and artistic statements--are studied very closely. The goal is not only to acquaint students with a chronology of texts and their authors, but also to view African American literature both independently and in the context of cultural, intellectual and political histories of people of color in the United States.

ENG 066: READING RACE & ETHNICITY, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores literature from the perspective of the cultural work it performs with regard to constructing or challenging racial and ethnic identities, including racialized national, communal and individual identities. The course varies but may examine particular literary traditions (e.g., African American Literature) or particular critical issues (e.g., challenges to the Eurocentric canon).

ENG 067: ASIAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
A brief introduction to 20th century literature by and about North Americans of Asian descent. This course aims to provide students with an historical foundation, a literary survey, and an appreciation of some of the contemporary issues related to race, class, and gender identity among Chinese Americans, Japanese Americans, Korean Americans, Filipino Americans, and Asian Indians. Includes fiction, poetry, criticism, autobiography/memoir, nonfiction essay, and film. May be used as part of Women's and Gender Studies Concentration.

ENG 068: READING POPULAR CULTURE, 3 credit hrs.
This course examines the form, content, conventions, and innovations in various kinds of popular culture (such as genre fiction, music, television, film, comics, video games and other new media.). With an eye toward challenging distinctions of "high" and "low" culture, students will theorize the production and reception of these texts within their political and historical context, examining the cultural work popular texts do.

ENG 075: INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES, 3 credit hrs.
This course is designed to familiarize students with women's experiences, as well as with the ways in which society shapes notions of gender. The course also provides ways to identify and analyze how a society's notions of gender shape the ways in which a society sees and organizes itself. Class members examine the construction of women's societal roles and their personal experiences, discussing points of congruence and dissonance. As an interdisciplinary course, reading and discussion material are drawn from fields such as religion, sociology, psychology, political science and literature, among others, so students can examine the view, status and contributions of women. Class sessions consist of a mixture of lectures, guest speakers, films and discussion. Crosslisted with WGS 001.

ENG 077: READING GENDER, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores literature from the perspective of the cultural work it performs with regard to constructing or challenging gender identities. The course varies but may examine particular literary traditions (e.g., literature by women of color) or particular critical issues (e.g., (de)constructing masculinity in the writings of women).

ENG 080: TOPICS IN WRITING, 3 credit hrs.
This course will introduce students to a question or closely related set of questions germane to the study of the processes and production of writing and/or to a particular genre of writing not represented by courses numbered 81-99.

ENG 081: INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LINGUISTICS, 3 credit hrs.
An introduction to the systematic study of the English language and of language in general. Words; sounds; grammar and structure; language and culture; world languages and development of English; language and the brain; language growth in the child; variations and dialects; writing systems.

ENG 083: ENGLISH IN AMERICA: LANGUAGE, CITIZENSHIP & IDENTITY, 3 credit hrs.
This course intends to introduce students to ways that the national media, the government, the academic community and broader American society have represented English: as local and national language, as citizen, and national identity: during the second half of the twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries. By examining competing representations of English, students will investigate what English has come to mean for different groups with different interests, as well as the implications of these competing perspectives for how English functions in various 

ENG 086: READING AND WRITING SEXUALITY, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores contemporary conceptions of sexual identity with particular emphasis on gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender and queer identities. The course examines theories and practices of representing sexuality, including conventions for talking about or censoring talk about sex. Writing assignments are designed to help students think critically and creatively about the complex phenomenon of human sexuality. Frequent writing and revision. May be used as part of Women's Studies concentration.

ENG 088: READING AND WRITING ABOUT CLASS, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores contemporary conceptions of socioeconomic class identity, with particular emphasis on the United States context. The course examines theories and practices of representing class. Writing assignments are designed to help students think critically and creatively about the complex phenomena of class structures and class-based identity categories, and about the effects of these structures and categories on everyday life and self-presentation. We will read and discuss texts from a variety of genres: fiction, non-fiction, and theory. Also, we will trace historical changes in American definitions and perceptions of class. Frequent writing and revision. May be used as part of Women's and Gender Studies Concentration.

ENG 090: READING AND WRITING DRAMA, 3 credit hrs.
An introduction to the practice of drama, this course will explore a variety of approaches to both reading and writing plays. Traditions and theories that have helped shape and continue to influence plays and playwriting will be discussed in relation to the student's own work in this genre. Writing assignments include both critical and original scripts. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 091: READING AND WRITING POETRY, 3 credit hrs.
An introduction to the practice of poetry, this course explores a variety of approaches to both reading and writing poems. Traditions and theories that have helped shape and continue to influence contemporary poetry are discussed in relation to the student's own work in this genre. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 092: READING AND WRITING THE SHORT STORY, 3 credit hrs.
An introduction to reading and writing short fiction. The course explores the traditions, theories and practices that have shaped short stories, with emphasis on the fiction of the later 20th century. Writing assignments include both critical papers and original stories. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 093: READING AND WRITING NON-FICTION, 3 credit hrs.
An introduction to reading and writing non-fiction. Different sections may focus on essay writing, life writing, literary journalism, travel writing, scientific writing, and so on. Emphasis is on the student's own production of texts, as well as on traditions and practices of the particular genre. Activities will include frequent writing and discussion of papers. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 094: BUSINESS & ADMINISTRATIVE WRITING, 3 credit hrs.
The theory, principles, and processes of effective business and administrative communication, among which may be informative and persuasive letters and memos, informal proposals, policy and procedure descriptions, application letters, resumes, directives, performance reviews and evaluations, and letters of recommendation. Class discussion of student work with emphasis on how each document represents the writer and how well it achieves its purpose. Frequent writing and revision. Prereq.: Sophomore standing.

ENG 095: WRITING REPORTS & PROPOSALS, 3 credit hrs.
A study of the nature, function and types of reports and proposals, including principles of organizational communication; audience analysis; gathering, assessing and organizing information; rhetoric of layout and design principles; oral presentation of data. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 102: STRUCTURE OF MODERN AMERICAN ENGLISH, 3 credit hrs.
This course engages students in a synchronic (present-day) analysis of the phonological, morphological and grammatical structure of current American English. Prescriptive practices ("correctness") are considered within a socio-linguistic context. Students are asked to develop a vocabulary to talk about language and style systematically and scientifically, and to produce deep-structure, hierarchical sentence analyses.

ENG 104: HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, 3 credit hrs.
This course focuses on the development of the English language from pre-English through the Old and Middle English periods, to the Early Modern and Modern period. In addition to historical changes and developments in the phonological, morpholigical, and lexical and grammatical systems of English, students will consider the cultural implications of those changes over time, as evidenced by the existence and continuing development of creoles and "World Englishes."

ENG 105: TEACHING ENGLISH AS SECOND LANGUAGE, 3 credit hrs.
Study of "what to teach and how to teach it" to people whose native language is not English. The theory underlying ESL instruction, and the methodology and strategies of teaching, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to non- native speakers of English.

ENG 109: PROSE STYLISTICS: ANALYSIS & APPLICATIONS, 3 credit hrs.
This course invites students to develop a capacity to analyze language closely at the phrase and sentence level, and thus, to become more aware of the stylistic qualities of written prose. Students will gain some familiarity with grammatical and rhetorical terms as they focus on what constitutes "style" in a given text, and how style and "substance" are related. Through frequent writing and revision, students will work to gain control over their own style, and will become more adept at shaping their language to suit their own writing purposes.

ENG 111: READING AND WRITING THE PERSONAL ESSAY, 3 credit hrs.
Essayists have celebrated the flexibility of the personal essay, its successful appropriation of widely varying forms and subjects, its penchant for exploration and risk-taking. Students read selected essayists and write essays themselves, considering what sort of work the essay does now (and has done in the past) and what critical problems the essay might present as we try to find a language that speaks in and to its particular forms and concerns. Frequent writing and revision.

ENG 112: AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND MEMOIR, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course will focus on two genres of life writing: autobiography (primarily based on verifiable information) and memoir (primarily based on the author's memories). The course will address remembering and capturing the past; vividly describing people and places; incorporating dialogue, emotion, historical context, and humor; and other components of effective life writing. The class will also examine the ethics of life writing. Over the course of the semester, students will explore the strategies discussed in class by writing and revising their own memoirs.

ENG 113: CROSS-GENRE WRITING, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course will explore the possibilities for writing within and against traditional generic boundaries. Students read works situated within genres (essays, poetry, drama, and fiction), as well as experimental cross-genre works, to increase their understanding of genre (as a concept and as practics), of the changing historical construction of literary genres, and of the numerous possibilities for writing. Students write within each genre, then experiment with writing that complicates or breaks down the boundaries between them. This course requires frequent writing and revision. Prerequisites: one of the following: ENG 90, 91, 92, or 93 or instructor permission.

ENG 114: ADVANCED POETRY WRITING, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course-- intended for those who have previous experience with reading and writing poetry-- will explore further the practice of poetry. Students will read essays on poetry and poetics, write poems, and discuss elements of craft within the broader context of literary studies. The course emphasizes critical analysis of selected texts, including student work. Frequent writing and revision. Prerequisites: ENG 091 or 113 or instructor permisison.

ENG 115: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course-- intended for those who have previous experience with reading and writing fiction-- will read and analyze published fiction, write their own fiction, and discuss elements of effective fiction writing. This course emphasizes the critical analysis of selected texts and discussion of student work. Frequent writing and revision. Prerequisite: ENG 092 or 113, or instructor permission.

ENG 116: CREATIVE WRITING FOR NEW MEDIA, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course will read and write works of literature (fiction, poetry, etc.) designed for digital and new media platforms, especially work designed for the internet and/or mobile devices. We will begin with the history of OuLiPo and some readings in media theory, but our focus will be on creative practice, the methods and meanings of text/image/sound integration/justaposition, and the literary uses of interactivity, including Hypertext and other digitally-integrated forms. We will also explore the possibilities of non-linear literature, with a focus on the connection between narrative and game play.

ENG 117: ADAPTATIONS AND TRANSFORMATIONS, 4 credit hrs.
This course examines the theory and practice of adapting narratives into new mediums and/or for new audiences, and asks essential questions about what defines a "story" in the face of radical transformations, how those transformations can reflect changes in culture and interpretation, and why certain elements of a text may be stable or unstable over time. Forms may include (but are not limited to): folk tales, literary fiction, staged performances, television, film, and video games. Students can expect to analyze the adaptations and transformations of others as well as create original adaptations themselves.

ENG 118: READING AND CREATING COMICS, 3 credit hrs.
This course will allow students to explore comics as literature, art, and design, and to create comics of their own. Readings may include Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics; Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home; selections from online comics including The Oatmeal, xkcd, and Existential Comics; as well as essays and theoretical readings that consider comics as both visual and literary art. Students in this course will create approximately 8 pages of comics, write several responses and essays that engage with readings and reflect on individual practice, and will engage in frequent drawing and writing exercises. The course will culminate in a polished comic of at least five pages. Course requires no prior experience in drawing. No prerequisite.

ENG 120: ADVANCED TOPICS IN WRITING, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course at the advanced level will explore a focused issue or set of issues in the process and production of writing. Topics might include "Creative Writing: Collage and Collaboration," "Writing for New Media," "Reading and Writing the Novella," and so on. Section-specific course descriptions will be availabel before registration. Frequent writing and revision. Prerequisites: One of the following: If prerequisite taken before Fall 2013: ENG 060, 061, 086, 090, 091, 092, or 093 or instructor permission. If prerequisite taken Fall 2013 or after: ENG 038, 039, 086, 090, 091, 092, or 093 or instructor permission. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 122: TOPICS IN POPULAR MUSIC, 3 credit hrs.
This course focuses on topics in the interpretation of popular music in 20th-century popular culture. Each version of the course (e.g., musicial subcultures and popular taste, youth cultures and music, popular music and literary movements) devotes attention to issues of genre definition, representation and narration, production and reception, or, more generally, to the "cultural work" such texts and practices perform. Listening/viewing lab required. Frequent writing and revision. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 123: ADVANCED TOPICS IN THEORY AND CRITICISM, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course will explore, in-depth, a particular topic or approach to theory and criticism, or a closely-related group of topics and approaches. Students will be asked to familiarize themselves with the key principles and methods of the topic or approach, as well with the specialized vocabularies and usages particular to it. Examples of such topics include Poetics, Aesthetics, Psychoanalysis, Structuralism, Feminist Theory, and Post-Colonialism. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisites: ENG 060 or 038 or instructor approval.

ENG 124: ADVANCED TOPICS IN HISTORY AND TRADITION, 3 credit hrs.
Topics for sections of this course will focus on pre-1900 texts and on literary practices and genres specific to the time period or national culture within which those texts were written. Thus, a version of the course might focus on the 19th century Gothic novel or on 17th century metaphysical poetry in ways that examine the cultural and historical context surrounding the production and reception of the texts. Such courses will ask students to work intensively with the language and conventions of the texts and with its contemporary as well as modern critical reception and interpretation.

ENG 125: ADVANCED TOPICS IN CULTURE AND IDENTITY, 3 to 5 credit hrs.
This course concentrates on topics in popular culture and representations of identity. Each version of the course will devote attention to a particular set of issues in the production and reception of specific popular cultural and/or identity formations -- for instance, the politics of 21st-century memes, a century of detective fiction, the birth and death of the soap opera, gender in contemporary horror fiection and film, technologies of reproduction in science fiction/fantasy. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 126: FILM AND TELEVISION HISTORY AND CRITICISM, 3 credit hrs.
This course serves as a survey to the interpretation of cinema and/or television as mass culture forms. Each version of the course will take a broader approach to the history of cinema and television studies in relation to the cultural context in which such media were produced and consumed (e.g. early cinema history, French cinema, World cinema, suburbs and the rise of television). The course will attend to issues of genre definition, representation and narration, production and reception, or, more generally, to the "cultural work" such texts and practices perform. Outside film screenings will be a feature of this course. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 127: ADVANCED TOPICS IN NEW MEDIA, 3 credit hrs.
Students will focus on one or several New-Media topics that fall within the scope of English Studies (Language, Literature, Storytelling, Poetics, Cultural Studies, an so on). Specific subjects may include "Literature of the Internet," "Narratives of Gaming," Electronic Poetics." May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 128: ADVANCED TOPICS IN DRAMA, 3 credit hrs.
Students will explore a particular question, problem, issue, or topic germane to the study of drama as a literary genre (rather than as theatrical or technical practice). A particular section of this course may delineate its topic according to historical period, dramatic tradition, cultural origin, theoretical or critical method, theatre or theatre company, or "schools" of drama. Examples of such topics include Modernist Experimental Drama, Epic Drama, Melodrama, Classical Drama, Drama of Resistance, Gendered Performances, Theatre of Cruelty, Absurdism, and the like. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 129: ADVANCED TOPICS IN FILM, 3 credit hrs.
This course is designed to have students perform an intensive critical analysis of a particular topic in cinema studies. Topics may be arranged according to genre, movement, author or theoretical approach (i.e. historical film noir, the Nouvelle Vague, Hitchcock/Wilder, film theory and the aesthetics/politics debate). Students should anticipate a more rigorous theoretical, historical and formal examination of the cinema. Outside film screenings will be a feature of this course. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 130: STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRES, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of the history, criticism, theory and status of a literary genre, such as the epic, romance, short story, essay and so on. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 131: MAJOR HISTORICAL FIGURES (BEFORE 1900), 3 credit hrs.
A study of the works of one or more major writers whose works were composed, for the most part, prior to 1900 with an emphasis on understanding the figure's importance in historical context as well as her or his legacy. Primary texts will be supplemented by secondary texts (such as literary criticism, biography, and/or adaptations) that discuss the figure(s). The figure(s) to be studied may vary. May be repeated once for credit when the topic changes.

ENG 132: DICKENS IN LONDON, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this seminar will read texts written by Charles Dickens and will visit sites in London that are pertinent to Dickens's life and writings. Sites visited in London will include: The Dickens House Museum, The British Library, Covent Garden, The Tate, Southwark (including Borough Market and the remaining wall of the Marshalsea prison), Kensington Palace, and walking tours of neighborhoods with Dickensian connections. During a side trip to Rochester, students will tour Restoration House (a model for Satis House in Great Expectations) and Watt's Charity (central to The Seven Poor Travellers). Readings will include Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, The Seven Poor Travellers, a brief biography of Dickens, and selections of Dickens's journalism. The writing assignments for the course ask students to reflect critically upon how visiting London affects their understanding of Dickens's writing as well as how reading Dickens's writings affects their response to and experience of London.

ENG 133: MAJOR CONTEMPORARY FIGURES (SINCE 1900), 3 credit hrs.
A study of the works of one or more major writers whose works were composed, for the most part, after 1900. Primary texts will be supplemented by secondary texts (such as literary criticism, biography, and/or adaptations) that discuss the figure(s). The figure(s) to be studied may vary. May be repeated once for credit when the topic changes.

ENG 135: ADOLESCENT LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
Selected readings in fiction, poetry and non-fiction written for young adults, with emphasis on contemporary novels. Discussions explore the relationship of the adolescent characters to adults and peers, the rites of passage in each story, and the contrasting narrative viewpoints from which these stories are told. Some attention to teaching this literature to junior high and high school students.

ENG 136: ADOLESCENCE AND AMERICAN FICTION, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores how selected short stories and novels represent the adolescent experience in the United States: how the adolescent protagonist is positioned in relation to other groups and the larger culture, the attitude of the implied author toward adolescence, and experiences that comprise "growing." Writing assignments include critical reponses and an original short story. May be used as part of Women's and Gender Studies Concentration.

ENG 140: SHAKESPEARE: TEXTS/CONTEXTS, 3 credit hrs.
This course centers on reading selected Shakespearean plays closely and imaginatively, focusing especially on how they are shaped by and, in turn, give shape to the interrelations between the culture that gave rise to them as well as in late 20th and early 21st-century culture(s).

ENG 141: ADVANCED TOPICS IN IRISH LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
This course examines a focused question or set of questions concerning the construction and depiction of Irish-ness in writing by and about the Irish. Topics may include the rise of the Irish National Theater, Irish Writing in/about Exile, Anglo-Irish Writing, or Reading and Writing the Irish Other. This course may be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 142: ADVANCED TOPICS IN EARLY ENGLISH TEXTS (TO 1500), 3 credit hrs.
To read original texts written during the 1000 year period beginning with the epic poem, Beowulf, and ending with Chaucer and Malory requires specialized knowledge not only of the (developing) English language of the period, but also of medieval interpretive practices. Different versions of this course may focus on such topics as the Arthurian tradition, courtly love and the medieval love lyric, early epic and heroic literature, saints' lives, homilies and ecclesiastical histories. Students will gain some familiarity with the language(s) of medieval England and Scotland, contemporary cultural practices, authorship and deliberate textual obscurity, and the Christian exegetical tradition. They will also consider modern theoretical and critical responses to medieval literatures. Sections which focus on Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse epics will read those texts in translation. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 143: ADVANCED TOPICS IN EARLY MODERN TEXTS (1500-1780), 3 credit hrs.
This course examines cultural texts from the sixteenth, seventeenth, and/or eithteenth centuries, focusing critical attention on what makes these works both "early" and "modern." Study will likely be organized by period, national tradition, theme, and/or genre, and may consider topics like the construction of subjectivity, literacy, nationhood, colonialism, and the like. Past topics, for example, have included revenge in the English Renaissance, early modern women writers, and literature from the scene of Atlantic encounter. This course may be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

ENG 146: 19TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE, 3 to 5 credit hrs.
The study of a variety of texts from the British Isles and its colonial territories published between 1800-1899, with sustained attention to the way fiction as well as non-fiction interacted with the social issues of the time, including contested notions of "British" identity, the Industrial Revolution, social class mobility, gender roles, scientific debates, race relations, and imperialism.

ENG 147: 20TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course will focus their attention on a particular topic, question, issue, or problem germane to the production, reception, interpretation, or analysis of British literary and/or filmic texts of the 20th Century. This course encourages students to explore a narrowly focused body of work, such as a particular genre or form or works dealing with a particular theme or question, and to consider it principally in terms of developments and tensions in British society and of what it may have meant to be and to write "British" during the 20th Century.

ENG 148: IRISH LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
A study of Irish writing in English, mostly from the early 19th century to the present, in terms of socio-political developments, the complex relationship of the Irish writer to English language and culture, and the persisting (and conflicting) images of Ireland, the Irish and Irishness informing such writings.

ENG 149: CONTEMPORARY BRITISH LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
Students in this course will focus their attention on developments in British literary and cultural production since the late 20th Century. This course encourages students to understand British literature in terms of specifically contemporary social, historical, and/or aesthetic factors, such as globalism, terror, the new Europe, rapic cultural and ethnic diversification, the rise of digital technologies and new media, celebrity culture, and the like.

ENG 150: POETRY AND SOCIETY 1720-1920, 3 credit hrs.
A study of representative poetry from Britain and the United States written between the early 18th century and the early 20th, neoclassicism to modernism, with attention to possible relationships between literary change and broader changes in British and U.S. societies.

ENG 151: COLONIAL AMERICAN LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
Students will spend focused attention on a genre, social issue, historical period, aesthetic movement, or collection of related texts written prior to 1800. Focus will be on the role of writing in the American "colonial" experience and/or different understandings of the boundaries of "America" and "American" identity during this time.

ENG 152: 19TH CENTURY AMERCIAN LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
Students will study a genre, social issue, historical period, aesthetic movement, or collection of related texts written between 1800 and 1900, exploring the interconnections among history, "American" identity, and what we call "literature."

ENG 155: 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
The study of a variety of literary writing in America during the 20th century. Fiction, poetry and other writings, including film, considered principally in terms of developments and tensions in modern American society and of what it may have meant to be "American" during this period.

ENG 156: CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
This course will explore recent literature (poetry, fiction, non-fiction, drama), focusing on one genre or working across genres. Students should anticipate studying a variety of styles/forms, connecting literature to contemporary experience and culture.

ENG 158: SOUTH AFRICAN LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
An intensive study of literature from South Africa ranging in date from the late nineteenth century to the present. Students will consider the ways in which writers use fiction, non-fiction, and poetry to capture, represent, and comment upon the complexities of South African life and culture during and after apartheid. This course investigates representations of issues such as the long-term effects of apartheid on race relations, gender relations, and economic inequity. More broadly, the course considers how the literature of this nation raises and addresses broader questions of what it means to form human identity, the troublesome propensity of human beings to oppress and inflict suffering on others, and the sometimes surprising methods in which suffering people survive assaults on their bodies as well as their imaginations. This course satisfies the Global/Multicultural Understanding AOI requirement.

ENG 162: RECENT FICTION BY WOMEN, 3 credit hrs.
This course studies the work of selected women writers since World War II and especially of the last two decades. It focuses on issues of gender, race and class in works that concern themselves with women's lives, social change and the future of the planet.

ENG 163: TRANS-CULTURAL LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
This course asks students to investigate the relationship between writing and the exploration of positions on the "border" of diverse cultures. Students will read and write about texts by writers whose gender, professional, educational, religious, and family backgrounds tend to "place" them simultaneously within a range of dissonant cultures. To provide critical perspectives for their reading and writing, students will also examine critical essays that investigate issues which face writers concerned to write from the borders and the cultural function of this type of writing.

ENG 164: LATINO/A LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
This course is an introduction to Latino/a literature and film, especially to their cultural influences and effects. Readings are studied in context with the history of relations between Latin American/Caribbean countries and the United States, with Anglo-American representation of Hispanics, and with contemporary cultural issues such as bilingualism. May be used as part of Women's and Gender Studies Concentration.

ENG 165: POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
This course is an introduction to literature by writers from nations that were formerly European colonies. Influential texts by European writers about the colonial situation are also studied. The course introduces students to the critical framework and primary debates within the field of postcolonial literature. There are two versions of this course: one centering on the literature of Africa, the other on Asia. May be used as part of Women's and Gender Studies Concentration.

ENG 166: LITERATURE OF WAR, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores the special problem of writing and reading about war. Students study how writers have attempted to make sense out of the experiences of war and of war's psychological, social, political, and cultural aftermath. The course may focus on a particular war: Civil, World War II, Vietnam, Gulf, for instance: or it may examine the phenomenon of war from a chronological and/or cross-national perspective. In any case, the texts (stories, essays, poems, films, documentaries, etc) are placed in a historical context.

ENG 168: STORYTELLING AS A SOCIAL PRACTICE, 3 credit hrs.
This course examines the different functions of storytelling through reading, writing about and producing different approaches to storytelling. Through examining and writing texts, students are concerned with issues such as the relationship between storytellers and communities and social institutions, as well as how storytelling works to preserve and change communities and culture. Emphasis is on recent texts, and there is attention to the historical functions of storytelling. May be used as part of Women's and Gender Studies Concentration.

ENG 169: THEORIES OF MYTH & ARCHETYPES, 3 credit hrs.
The terms "myth" and "archetype" account for diverse cultural practices and a range of theoretical understandings studies in such disciplines as anthropology, philosophy, psychology, sociology, linguistics, folklore and literary theory. To understand how myths and archetypes function as representational systems within cultural and literary narratives -- ancient or modern-- we will draw from different theoretical frameworks as we construct ways of reading through a given set of national myths (e.g., Old Norse, Greek and Roman, Babylonian), or mythic systems or subjects (e.g., creation, the hero, the divine child).

ENG 171: TEACHING WRITING: THEORY AND PRACTICE, 3 credit hrs.
This course focuses on the theory and practice of teaching writing. Students will be introduced to competing theories of writing and explore their implications for various teaching practices. Topics to be addressed include the overall design and structure of writing and writing- intensive courses, relations between writing and reading, assignment writing, responding to student papers, responding to "error," and working with diverse student populations. Prereq.: ENG 060, or 061, or one course between 100 and 174.

ENG 172: TEACHING TUTORIAL WRITING, 1 credit hr.
Instruction in and experience with tutoring student writers under the supervision of the director of the Writing Workshop. Weekly meetings and required writing. Readings and discussion of topics such as promoting fluency and critical analysis, responding to cultural differences, teaching revision, etc. Prereq.: instructor's consent.

ENG 173: CRITICAL THEORY, 3 credit hrs.
This course considers ways in which critical theories are embodied in reading and writing practices. Students read, discuss and write about texts in critical theory and engage in specific critical/theoretical practices. Prereq.: ENG 60 OR 61 and one course at the 100-174 level.

ENG 174: THEORIES OF LANGUAGE AND DISCOURSE, 3 credit hrs.
The course is designed to familiarize students with the different ways theorists have studied and defined language and discourse. Theories constructed by philosophers, psychologists, linguists and social theorists are examined, and students become involved in critical analysis of the epistemological assumptions of these theories. May be used as part of Women's and Gender Studies Concentration. Prereqs: sophomore standing at time of registration.

ENG 175: TOPICS IN AUTHORSHIP, 3 credit hrs.
This course seeks to problematize the assumptions that inform our notions of "author" and "authorship." Specific subjects that would focus such a study include a particular historical or cultural setting (e.g., "The Literary Marketplace in Turn-of-the-Century Britain"), one or more specific writers (Jane Austen, The Brontes, George Eliot), or the historical development of ownership, plagiarism and censorship. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Must be Junior or Senior, English or Writing or SEED major.

ENG 178: TOPICS IN MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE, 3 credit hrs.
As an alternative to a survey, this course invites an issue- oriented approach to the interpretation of Multicultural literature in general or of different cultural or ethnic traditions such as African American, Asian American, Chicano or Native American in particular. The course explores (and problematizes) the study of multicultural writing in terms of its relationship to the prevailing history of Anglo-American letters, its posture outside of that history, and its relation to other literatures of color. The specific focus of the course varies each time offered, but each version of the course devotes some attention to the matters of genre definition, period definition, and canon definition. Must be a junior or senior English, Writing, or Secondary Education major.

ENG 180: SEMINAR IN LITERARY THEORY, 3 credit hrs.
This course concentrates on the study of a literary theory, school, theoretical issue or critic under debate. Topics can include the process of canon formation, new historicism, the opposition between new criticism and deconstruction, postmodernism, and feminist literary theory. Prereq.: ENG 060, ENG 061, and three courses at the 100-174 level. Must be a junior or senior, English, Writing, or Secondary Education major.

ENG 181: TOPICS IN LITERACY STUDIES, 3 credit hrs.
A seminar on varying topics concerning literacy, such as its relation to orality, its relation to culture(s), its acquisition, the history of literacy, theories of composing in writing, the past and contemporary teaching and learning of literacy, and theories of written "error." Must be a junior or senior, English, Writing or secondary education major.

ENG 182: TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES, 3 credit hrs.
This course concentrates on approaches to specific topics or issues in the interpretation of social change in American culture. Intensive investigation of primary materials is a feature of every version of the course offered. Interdisciplinary methods for exploring questions of culture frame each course version. Must be a junior or senior English, Writing, or secondary education major.

ENG 183: DISCOURSE THEORY AND PRACTICE, 3 credit hrs.
This course focuses on controversy over a single issue or topic in discourse theory and practice that has either continued throughout history or that has been a topical concern of recent debate concerning discourse as a human artifact and social activity. Each course is concerned with sociopolitical implications of a particular controversy. Topics for exploration might be what is the sign or what is sociological discourse, and the topic is investigated by students through their examination of "literary" and/or "non-literary" texts that serve as contrasting examples of or perspectives on a particular issue. Prereq.: ENG 060, ENG 061, and three courses at the 100-174 level. Must be a junior or senior English, Writing, or Secondary Education major.

ENG 185: TRAVEL SEMINAR, 3 to 6 credit hrs.
Ranging from 3-6 credits, travel seminars take place primarily off campus, with some class meetings occurring on campus before travel and the possibility of on-campus class sessions after travel.

ENG 188: AUTHORIZING SELF AND LIFE STORIES, 3 credit hrs.
This course asks students to investigate the relationship between personal narratives and contesting forms and practices that "place" writers "inside" and/or "outside" seemingly unified, static and discrete disciplinary, gender, racial and economic/political boundaries. To that end, students examine texts from a variety of disciplines-- English, sociology, history, psychology, political science, American studies--that explore the relationship between such categories as fact versus fiction, creative performance versus scientific research, or private life versus public accounts. At the same time, students engage in a writing project that asks them to experiment with ways of telling self/life stories against and within the conceptual borders traditionally separating English studies, American studies, history, psychology, political science and sociology. Must be a junior or senior English, Writing, or Secondary Education major.

ENG 195: CAPSTONE IN ENGLISH & WRITING, 3 credit hrs.
This seminar fulfills the capstone requirement for both Writing and English majors, and is tailored to students whose work and interests include both literary and film analysis, theory, and history, on the one hand, and writing, on the other. The specific topic of the seminar will be determined by the instructor, but all capstone seminars are summative, providing students with an opportunity to reflect on their development and direction at the end of their undergraduate experience. Toward that end, students will undertake a semester-long project, tied to the seminar topic, but providing opportunities for students to reflect criticall on the text they are producing and to participate in conversations that extend the project beyond the classroom. This course may be taken to fulfill other upper-division requirements and electives, with advisor approval, instead of as a capstone seminar.

ENG 196: CAPSTONE IN WRITING, 3 credit hrs.
This seminar fulfills the capstone requirement for Writing majors. The specific topic of the seminar will be determined by the instructor, but all capstone seminars are summative, providing students with an opportunity to reflect on their development and direction at the end of their undergraduate experience. Toward that end, students will undertake a semester-long project, tied to the seminar topic, but providing opportunities for students to reflect critically on the text they are producing and to participate in conversations that extend the project beyond the classroom. This course may be taken to fulfill other upper-division electives and requirements, with advisor approval, instead of as a capstone seminar.

ENG 197: CAPSTONE IN ENGLISH, 3 credit hrs.
This seminar fulfills the capstone requirement for English majors. The specific topic of the seminar will be determined by the instructor, but all capstone seminars are summative, providing students with an opportunity to reflect on their development and direction at the end of their undergraduate experience. Toward that end, students will undertake a semester-long project, tied to the seminar topic, but providing opportunities for students to reflect critically on the text they are producing and to participate in conversations that extend the project beyond the classroom. This course may be taken to fulfill other upper-division electives and requirements, with advisor approval, instead of as a capstone seminar.

ENG 198: INDEPENDENT STUDY, 1 to 4 credit hrs.
Readings, conferences, reports and a research paper/ semester portfolio under the direction of a faculty member. The student defines the topic and schedule of activities in consultation with a faculty mentor.

ENG 199: INTERNSHIP IN WRITING, 1 to 3 credit hrs.
Internship in Writing (one to three credits): This course provides students the opportunity to use, develop, extend and reflect upon their writing. Internships may be within or outside the university, in business or non-profit organizations, and must require writing in some form as a key feature of the work. Prerequisites: 60 hours in college credit; ENG 060 and ENG 061; major/minor status; 2.75+ GPA in English courses; advisor approval.

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