Courses

Intro Level Courses

Advanced Courses

Colloquium Courses

Seminar Courses

Other Courses
(Special topics, internship, independent study)

Intro Level Courses

HIST 001: PASSAGES TO 1750, 3 credit hrs.
This course begins with a comparison of the feudal societies that existed before 1500. It then traces the origins of capitalism in Western Europe and the subsequent impact of Europe on Africa, Asia and the Americas. It also examines the areas that lay beyond this new world system and closes with a look at the winds of change that were blowing in many parts of the globe by 1750.

HIST 002: PASSAGES SINCE 1750, 3 credit hrs.
This course begins with discussion of the industrial and democratic revolutions that transformed the Western world from 1750 to 1870, and then analyzes the imperialist surge of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It next explores the relationship between these events and the two world wars, global depression and revolutions that characterized the 1914-1945 era. Finally the course examines the stunning global changes that have occurred since the 1950s.

HIST 021: EAST ASIAN HISTORY TO 1600, 3 credit hrs.
The formation, evolution and expansion of the major cultural centers of Asia, including India, China and Japan. The principal themes are the origin and growth of various philosophies and the development of major economic, social and political trends.

HIST 022: EAST ASIAN HISTORY SINCE 1600, 3 credit hrs.
The transformation of East Asian societies from the arrival of Europeans to the present. The principal themes are the impact of the West, the modernization of Asia, the inception of nationalist and communist movements and major economic, political and social developments.

HIST 060: AFRICA IN WORLD HISTORY, 3 credit hrs.
HIST 060 is a survey of important issues in sub-Saharan Africa's history from approximately 1500 C.E. to the present. It is designed to accomplish two goals. One, to analyze the major forces that have caused social, political, and economic change from c.1500 to the present both within sub-Saharan Africa and between this region and the world. Two, to understand how these historical changes have contributed both to the region's current political systems, economies, and societies and to its global relationships. The course pursues one major theme to accomplish these goals: it focuses on how actions Africans have taken have affected the course of the continent's history and sub- Saharan Africa's interaction with the world.

HIST 067: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA, 6 credit hrs.
This course is a study abroad course designed to take at least two steps towards educating Drake students as global citizens who are prepared to operate in a global economy. On the one hand, it will take students from Drake to an area of the world-sub-Saharan Africa-that is many ways distinctly different culturally, politically, ethnically, and economically from the U.S. On the other, it will also take students to a country in sub-Saharan Africa where they can focus their attention on issues that face these distinctly different countries as they become increasingly integrated into a global world. To accomplish these steps, the content of the course will focus on the circumstances people in these countries face as they try to achieve sustainable development while operating in a neo-liberal international business climate. Special attention will be directed towards analyzing infrastructure development, entrepreneurship, microfinance constraints, constitutional development, the colonial legacy and the transition to political democracy/pluralism, and the impact of HIV/AIDS on very poor countries.

HIST 075: U.S. HISTORY TO 1877, 3 credit hrs.
The course is divided into two periods. The 1607-1820 era witnessed the destruction of millions of native Americans; the formation of prosperous farming communities; the development of an independent society that was good for whites but oppressive for blacks; and the transformation of the family system. From 1820 to 1877, a new industrial society emerged, which led to increased north-south tensions, finally leading to the Civil War and Reconstruction.

HIST 076: U.S. HISTORY SINCE 1877, 3 credit hrs.
The course is divided into two periods. From 1877 to 1920, rapid industrialization both created a new social order and generated profound economic, political and cultural tensions. Since 1920, the lives of most Americans have been shaped by the growing power of the state and large corporations, the development of mass culture, international tensions, and the attempt to create equality for women and racial minorities.

HIST 099: EUROPEAN WOMEN'S HISTORY, 3 credit hrs.
A survey course, covering both women's experiences and the shifting definitions of gender in Western and Central Europe and its colonies from 1400 to 1945. Topics include peasant women, the witch hunts, aristocratic women, the female intellectual tradition, factory women, socialists and feminists. Crosslisted with WS 130.

Advanced Level Courses

HIST 112: CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION, 3 credit hrs.
Political, social and economic forces leading to the disruption of the Union; military action resulting from succession; economic and other non-military factors contribute to ultimate victory for the North; problems of reconstruction facing the United States.

HIST 113: AMERICA AS A WORLD POWER, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of the complex factors that shaped American diplomacy from the Wilson administration to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the interwar years, on the transformation of U.S. policy in the 1945-1950 period and on the major dilemmas of the Cold War years.

HIST 114: U.S. SINCE 1933, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of the impact on American society of the Great Depression, the international crisis of the late 1930's, World War II, the Cold War, and the growing domestic unrest of the late 1950s and 1960s.

HIST 115: FROM CONTACT TO REMOVAL: AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY 1492-1840, 3 credit hrs.
This course provides a multifaceted look at the ways that American Indians coped with the arrival of Europeans on the North American continent. The course begins with an exploration of American Indian history before the arrival of Columbus. Native perceptions of Europeans are discussed, as are the effects of European goods, diseases, and animals upon Native American societies. Indian resistance to European encroachment will be addressed, as well as the ways that European ideas and technologies were incorporated into American Indians' cultures. The centrality of American Indians to American history more generally will be a recurring theme of the course. May be used as part of Women's Studies Concentration.

HIST 123: MODERN MEXICO, 3 credit hrs.
A survey of Mexican history during the national period, from 1821 to the present. The course begins with the disintegration of the Spanish colony of New Spain and the achievement of Mexican independence after a decade of struggle. The course then divides into four sections. The first part examines the political, economic, social, and cultural trends of the turbulent first half of the nineteenth century. The second part focuses on the thirty- five year peace established by dictator Porfirio Diaz. The epic Mexican Revolution of 1910 and its national legacy are the topics of the third section. The final segment explores U.S.-Mexican relations from the Monroe Doctrine to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Dealing with significant border issues such as illegal immigration, narco-trafficking, and the international divisions of labor. Course readings, lectures, and in-class discussions also will emphasize social and cultural history, reflecting the most recent historiographical trends.

HIST 124: AZTECS, INCAS, MAYAS, 3 credit hrs.
This survey introduces students to the fascinating and complex histories of three major Pre-Columbian civilizations: the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas. All three great empires rose from inauspicious beginnings to reach unprecedented heights in political, social, and cultural development in the Americas. All three were among the first Amerindian cultures to encounter the physical, psychological, technological, strategic, and viral advantages of conquering Europeans in the New World. The course explores the rise, expansion, and collapse of each civilization and concludes with the systematic imposition of Spanish cultural forms in America. Does evidence suggest that these once-flourishing kingdoms had irreversibly decayed at the time of European contact? Or did they contain the seeds of further imperial and capitalist expansion? What evidence exists of Amerindian cultural resistance and survival in the wake of the brutal Iberian conquest? What are the historical legacies of the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas?

HIST 125: COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA, 3 credit hrs.
Latin American history from European contact with indigenous peoples of the Americas through the Wars of Independence. The course is divided into three sections. The first examines the geopolitical, economic, cultural, and environmental impact and consequences of Columbus's voyages; the European conquest of native Americans in the Carribbean, Mexico, and South America; and the imposition of Spanish and Portuguese institutions in the New World. The second section explores the major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments of the colonial period from 1550- 1750. The third and final section examines the eighteenth- century Bourbon Reforms and the disintegration of Spanish and Portuguese America. With this course students will achieve a greater understanding of Latin American culture and gain the necessary historical background for History 126, Modern Latin America.

HIST 126: MODERN LATIN AMERICA, 3 credit hrs.
History 126 is a survey of Latin American history during the national period, 1821-present. The course begins with the disintegration of Spanish and Portuguese America and then divides into three parts: 1) the political, economic, cultural trends of the nineteenth century 2) the revolutionary trends of the twentieth century, and 3) inter-American relations during the twentieth century. Each of the three parts is divided into sections devoted to the historical development of individual countries. The first section on the nineteenth century necessarily focuses on the four most important nations of modern Latin America: Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Brazil. To these four we add Cuba in the second part of the course on twentieth-century revolutions. The third and final section emphasizes the evolution of U.S. diplomatic and commercial relations with Central America and the Carribbean.

HIST 128: IMPERIAL CHINA, 3 credit hrs.
This course is primarily intended to help students gain a fuller understanding of the political, socio-economic, and cultural changes in imperial China (300-1800). We will explore the history of China from the collapse of the Han empire in the third century to the zenith of the Qing empire in the eighteenth century. This course also challenges the stereotype of a monolithic and static (or "ancient") China by encouraging students to develop a more critical and complicated understanding of the historical forces integrating and dividing that entity we now call "China". No pre-requisites.

HIST 129: MODERN CHINA, 3 credit hrs.
This course is an introduction to the history of China from the seventeenth century to the present day. The course will explore the momentous changes in the relationship between state and society from the founding of the Qing empire (1636-1912) to the establishment of th People's Republic of China (PRC). Topics to be studied include the rise of the Manchus, imperialism, rebellions, the self-strengthening and reform movements, nationalism, and revolution (political, social, and cultural) during this period of Chinese history. No prior knowledge of Chinese history is assumed or required.

HIST 130: TWENTIETH CENTURY CHINA, 3 credit hrs.
This course is an introduction to the history of China in the twentieth century, beginning with an overview of Chinese society and politics in the late Qing dynasty (1644- 1912). We will focus our attention on the economic, political, demographic, cultural, and social changes of the nineteenth century in order to inform our understanding of the events in the twentieth century. Topics to be studied in this course include the Revolution of 1911, the creation of Leninist parties under the Nationalists and Communists and the stuggle between them, the War of the Resistance against Japan, and the Civil War. We will also consider the establishment of the People's Republic of China and its evolution from the Great Leap Forward through the Cultural Revolution to the last two decades of reform and reaction. We end by examining China's strategic place in the world and the vexing issue of Taiwan and future Sino- American relations. No prior knowledge of Chinese history is assumed or required.

HIST 132: MODERN JAPAN, 3 credit hrs.
In this course, we will explore the history of the transformation of Japan from a semi-feudal system in the 17th century to its rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will cover a number of major historical themes that emerge from these four centuries of radical change: the deterioration of official forms of control during the Tokugawa era (1600-1867) and the rise of new commoner social and cultural spheres; Japan's entry into a world market in the mid-19th century and the establishment of the modern Japanese nation-state; industrial modernization and its social effects; the changing status of women; new forms of social protest and mass culture in the early 20th century; the rise of Japanese imperialism in Asia; World War II and its aftermath; the U.S. occupation and postwar recovery; "high-growth economics" and its social-environmental costs; and culture in "post-industrial" Japan. We will focus attention in particular on the stories of individuals whose lives do not fit neatly into conventional historical narratives.

HIST 133: EUROPE IN THE 19TH CENTURY, 3 credit hrs.
From the fires of the French Revolution to the "guns of August" beginning WWI, the course covers those aspects of nineteenth-century Europe: imperialism, class politics (socialism), feminism, technological development, and industrial capitalism: necessary to understand the 19th century was not peaceful, and that WWI was perhaps the most likely outcome.

HIST 134: CONTEMPORARY EUROPE, 3 credit hrs.
Cultural and ideological trends in the 20th century, World War I and its aftermath; social, political and economic developments between the wars; World War II; the United Nations and the Cold War.

HIST 135: HISTORY OF IMPERIAL RUSSIA, 3 credit hrs.
In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences that most affected the course of Russian history throughout the reign of the Romanov dynasty. This course is a historical overview of imperial Russia which scholars have traditionally construed as beginning with the reign of Peter the Great and lasting to the Russian Revolution of 1917. While adhering to the end date of this period, we will begin our investigation of this period much earlier with the establishment of the Russian state. Therefore, the course can be seen as a survey of Russian imperial history before the end of monarchy in 1917.

HIST 136: THE OLD REGIME AND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION, 3 credit hrs.
Institutional and social development of France, climaxing in the French Revolution. Special emphasis on the national and international significance of the Revolution.

HIST 138: HISTORY OF THE SOVIET UNION, 3 credit hrs.
This is a survey of the history of the Soviet Union, from 1917 to 1991. We will examine the economic, cultural, political, social and intellectual developments of the Soviet society and the state from its creation to its dissolution, paying special attention to the ways in which people in the Soviet Union experienced revolutionary changes, transforming events, and social experiments.

HIST 139: WORLD WAR I, 3 credit hrs.
This course covers the political, military, economic and social dimensions of the war, as an international war, and watershed in modern history. The lives of men and women on virtually every continent will be covered, along with problems of inequality, imperialism, economic development, psychological trauma, and diplomacy that the war exposes.

HIST 140: AFRICA'S COLONIAL MOMENT: CONTINUITY AND CHANGE IN THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES, 3 credit hrs.
Africa's history in the 19th and 20th centuries is crucial not only to understanding Africa's role and relevance in world history but also to understanding current circumstances and challenges that face the continent today. This is the case because, during this period, Africa experienced one of the most disruptive times in the continent's history--the period of European conquest and colonial rule. European powers endeavored to 'civilize' Africa—a process intended to transform Africans not only economically and politically but also in terms of how Africans saw themselves and their place in the world. Thus, in many ways, the continent in 1970 looked quite different than it had a century earlier. However, despite the differences, European powers clearly failed in their attempts to transform Africa and to 'civilize' its people according to their late 19th century Eurocentric, modernist notions of civilization. HIST 140 endeavors to analyze why. The main theme of this course is that, to understand change in Africa's history in this period of time, the colonial period itself should be 'decolonized' and seen as a moment in African history as opposed to a period in European history. In effect, the colonial state and its transformative goals must not be seen as an all-powerful institution operating hegemonically to achieve its ends uncontested; rather, it needs to be seen as embroiled and imbricated in the warp and weft of African life. Africa's colonial moment did not see Europeans (whether colonial officials, businessmen, missionaries, settlers, etc.) directing change by fiat; rather, they were subject to the very social, economic, and political forces that had been making Africa's history for generation. Drawing on recent research into local histories, histories of women and children, domestic politics, production relations, governance structures, etc. HIST 140 will question the degree to which Africa's colonial moment was African as well as colonial.

HIST 146: HISTORY, POLITICS, AND SOCIETY OF MODERN EGYPT, 3 credit hrs.
This seminar is an introduction to the history, politics, and culture of Egypt covering roughly the period from 1805 to the present. It will introduce students to some of the major questions, debates, and recurring themes in the study of contemporary Egyptian society in an interdisciplinary and theoretically informed fashion. Some of the topics we will cover include: socio-economic transformations in Egyptian society from 1952 to the present; the nature of Egyptian politics and political participation; the relationship between politics and culture in Egypt; political Islam or Islamist politics; and political economy and recurrent economic crises including the most recent changes in Egypt's political economy in the 1990s (structural adjustment, privatization and the socio- political consequences of these policies); the future of the republic after Mubarak.

Colloquium Level Courses

HIST 152: EUROPEAN ENLIGHTENMENT, 3 credit hrs.
We will concentrate on the intellectual, cultural, and philosophical issues in the long eighteenth century from the Scientific Revolution to the beginnings of the Romanticism in Europe. This course is designed to develop specific knowledge of the history of the Enlightenment ideas within the context of European history and to enhance your ability for critical analysis.

HIST 153: CHINESE COMMUNIST REVOLUTION, 3 credit hrs.
A history of the Chinese communist movement in the 20th century; war; the founding of the People's Republic; and the role of China in the contemporary world. The lives of prominent leaders are discussed and analyzed.

HIST 155: INTRODUCTION TO MARXISM, 3 credit hrs.
Through reading and analyzing materials by and about Karl Marx, students obtain an understanding of the major components of Marxism. Emphasis is placed on both the concepts Marx used in constructing his theories and on the theories themselves.

HIST 156: SEX, POWER, AND WAR IN THE AZTEC EMPIRE, 3 credit hrs.
HIST 156 is an upper division colloquium on Aztec history from the thirteenth century through the Spanish Conquest to the early sixteenth century. Although a clear and precise chronology is critical to understanding Aztec historical development, the course is divided into three overlapping thematic categories of historical analysis that highlight both the vitality and contradictions of the Aztec world: Gender, Relations of Power, and Imperialism. The section on sex examines the various roles and functions that females and males performed from birth to death, investigating the extent to which the Mexica achieved complementarity in relations of gender within an inherently unequal, male- dominated, and militaristic society. The second section on power focuses on kinship, occupational, and tributary relations between the Mexica and other ethnic groups of the Central Valley, early tribal diplomacy and state alliances, the imperial dynasty, and approaches to understanding Aztec territorial expansion. Section three introduces topics related to war: the inculcation of a warrior code of ethics, combat training, military logistics and tactics, politico- religious objectives, battlefield procedure, the disposition of captives, victim management, and human sacrifice. All three categories—sex, power, and war—merge under the terrifying, but unifying, force of Aztec religious beliefs. A fatalistic religion and pessimistic worldview promoted the only sense of communal solidarity and purpose in an otherwise violent, rigid, and divided civilization.

HIST 157: SEX AND POWER IN PEASANT SOCIETY, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of the lives of women and men in European peasant society, from the 14th through 19th centuries, using primary sources as much as possible, and focusing on relations of power both with the village and beyond the villagers' control: landlords, merchants, political change and definitions of gender that became increasingly inappropriate to rural life. May be used as part of Women's Studies Concentration.

HIST 161: AFRICA, AFRICANS AND ATLANTIC SLAVERY, 3 credit hrs.
This course is designed to root African slavery and trade in its varied African contexts. Thus, students will analyze how and why Africans were "produced" for the Atlantic slave trade and the influence African slaves had, via resistance, a slave economy, and slave culture, on the making of the Atlantic world. Prereq.: Sophomore standing or above.

HIST 166: WOMEN INTELLECTUALS IN THE WESTERN TRADITIONS, 3 credit hrs.
Readings in the work of women intellectuals, and their male colleagues, particularly addressing woman's nature, God, and political rights over approximately the last three thousand years, starting with the mysterious J at the court of King Solomon, and ending with the American Zora Neale Hurston. Cross-listed with WS 195.

HIST 168: U.S. INTERVENTIONISM, 3 credit hrs.
This course examines U.S. intervention in the affairs of other nations from the late-nineteenth century to the present era. Forms of intervention include wars and occupations, police actions, CIA-led coups and other covert activities, trade and investment practices, and cultural imperialism. The task of the course is to gain an understanding of the reasons behind U.S. interventionism and to assess the ramifications of such interventions.

HIST 169: THE U.S. AND THE ORIGINS OF THE COLD WAR, 3 credit hrs.
The course focuses upon United States foreign policy during the early part of the Cold War. Students will read and discuss, as well as write papers about, a number of works that examine two major issues. The first deals with the ongoing debate over the origins of the United States- Soviet Union confrontation. The second is an examination of the different ways that American policymakers sought to contain what they assumed to be were instances of Soviet "aggression."

HIST 172: WOMEN AND GENDER IN EARLY AMERICA, 3 credit hrs.
Seventy years ago, a pioneering historian asked what U.S. history would look like if seen "through women's eyes." In recent years, historians have tackled that project, producing a history of women and transforming our understanding of the past in the process. Focusing on early America from the period of contact, conquest, and settlement to the Civil War (1607-1865), this course pursues four related questions: How does our vision of early America change when we place women at the center of analysis? How does the process of "doing history" change when we place women at the center of analysis? How has gender shaped, and been shaped by, developments in early U.S. history? And how can we explain the differences among women's experiences? In this seminar, we will examine historical experiences common to American women while paying close attention to differences and divisions among them. We will also explore how individuals and groups have contested and perpetuated the ways Americans think about and experience gender in family life, education, sexuality, work, marriage, and politics.

HIST 173: WOMEN AND GENDER IN MODERN AMERICA, 3 credit hrs.
Seventy years ago, a pioneering historian asked what U.S. history would look like seen "through women's eyes." In recent years, historians have tackled that project, producing a history of women and transforming our understanding of the past in the process. Focusing on modern America from the Civil War to the recent past, this course pursues three related questions: How does our vision of U.S. history change when we place women at the center of analysis? How has gender shaped, and been shaped by, developments in U.S. history? And how can we explain the differences among women's experiences? In this seminar, we will examine historical experiences common to American women while paying close attention to differences and divisions among them. We will also explore how individuals and groups have contested and perpetuated the ways Americans think about and experience gender in family life, education, sexuality, work, marriage, and politics.

HIST 174: ERA OF CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION, 3 credit hrs.
The era of the Civil War and Reconstruction is widely regarded as a watershed in U.S. history. It forced Americans to confront two crucial questions that the Revolution and the Constitution of 1789 left unresolved: whether the United States was one nation with a sovereign national government or a federation of sovereign states, and whether slavery would continue in a republic founded with the declaration that all men are created equal. Understanding how 19th-century Americans responded to those questions is the focus of this course. The course is organized in three parts. In the first part, we will seek to understand the complex roots of the Civil War. In the second part, we will learn about different Americans' experiences of the war years, 1861-1865. In the last part of the course, we will examine two important outcomes of the war: slave emancipation and the troubled process of Reconstruction. Throughout, our attention will be devoted to the social, economic, and political history of the era. Please note: this is not a military history course.

HIST 175: SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION IN THE AMERICAN PAST AND PRESENT, 3 credit hrs.
With the end of the Civil War and the emancipation of four million slaves, nineteenth-century Americans embarked on an experiment with a truly interracial democracy. The experiment was short-lived. Within fifteen years, institutional and popular support for the changes that accompanied emancipation collapsed, and a violent racist counterrevolution was underway. For decades thereafter, the remarkable accomplishments of the era of emancipation were forgotten, obscured, and sometimes even denied by historians, politicians, writers, filmmakers, and the general public. The era of slave emancipation and Reconstruction continues to be one of the most hotly debated and poorly understood periods in US history. For the past 140 years, scholars and popular observers have interpreted the era as both a tragic mistake and a noble experiment, as both the fulfillment of the American Revolution and an unfinished revolution. In this course, we will study this tumultuous era in both history and popular memory, making a serious attempt to understand these divergent interpretations of the past and the impact they have had on Americans' historical consciousness and on their understanding of freedom, equality, and opportunity since 1863. By studying written and visual primary documents of the era as well as historical scholarship and popular accounts in film and print, students will have the opportunity to examine the evidence and assess for themselves how interpretations of slavery and emancipation have shaped (and continue to shape) public life in the United States.

HIST 176: NATIONALISM IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY, 3 credit hrs.
This course examines theories of modern nationalism and national identities in application to the history of Modern Europe. We will analyze some crucial aspects of the genesis of national identity and state-making processes in the history of Western, Central and Eastern Europe for the period between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries; explore new research problems regarding the corresponding issues of citizenship, exclusion, national belonging and imperialism; and provide a level of familiarity with the current research on nation and nationalism.

HIST 177: POLITICS AND SOCIETY IN LATE IMPERIAL CHINA, 3 credit hrs.
This course is an introduction to the history and historiography of late imperial China. The objective of the course is to introduce students to some of the classic historiographical debates on late imperial China as well as provide them with an understanding of key issues, events, and figures during this period. Taking the question "What happened in China between the late 1500s and 1900?" as our starting point, we will explore the ways in which various individuals experienced the momentous changes (social, political, economic, and cultural) during this key period of Chinese history.

HIST 178: WOMEN AND FAMILY IN MODERN CHINA, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores women's experiences and the changing meanings of womanhood in China over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. How have the lives and statuses of Chinese women changed during the past 150 years? What can we learn about modern Chinese history when we place women at the center of our inquiry? In addressing such questions, we will focus upon issues of marriage, motherhood, women's work, sexuality, notions of love, political participation and "women's liberation," as well as women's relationship to war and revolution.

HIST 186: HISTORY OF THE ENVIRONMENT, 3 credit hrs.
The environmental history of the continent and nation stretches from geologic time to the present. This course begins by defining different aspects of environmental history and introduces ways that the environment has been influential in shaping past human experience, as well as how humans have in turn shaped the environment. While surveying the sweep of American history through the lens of environment, special attention will be paid to historicizing present-day topics. Themes include the interconnectedness of people and nature, health (ecological and social health is an environmental issue), and the link between local and global. The course balances the physical (rocks, conservation and ecology) and the cultural (ideas, perceptions and images) environment.

HIST 187: HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN WEST, 3 credit hrs.
The course content will make familiar a broad swath of history of the Western region of the now-U.S. West. Though we deal with larger global and national forces and contexts, we maintain a geographical focus. We will engage the American West from a number of different perspectives (including primary sources, fiction, and monographs), look at the region's history in the concrete and the abstract (landscape and mythology, fact and symbol), and wrestle with complex histories and historiography.

HIST 188: URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY, 3 credit hrs.
Earn your urban ranger patch! study the history of urban environments, the place of the city in American cultyre, the development of cities and suburbs, and the city's role in regional and global environmental issues. With the class, explore urban ecology and the evolution of infrastructure, like sewers, waterworks and transportation networks. Potential main topics include urban planning, campus sustainability. New Orleans and historicizing Hurricane Katrina, and Midwestern flooding. Subjects engaged over time and in multiple cities include: environmental justice, tension over resource management, industrialization, food supply, and geography's relation to social structure. Includes a research project.

Seminar Level Courses

HIST 196: SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY, 3 credit hrs.
A systematic examination of selected aspects of European history. Depending on the instructor, the seminar may focus on the period between the World Wars, the post World War II years, or biography as a historical technique.

HIST 197: SEMINAR IN U.S. HISTORY, 3 credit hrs.
A systematic examination of selected aspects of American history. Depending on the instructor, the seminar may focus on historiography, the Jacksonian era, Civil War and Reconstruction, foreign relations, urban history, or recent U.S. history.

HIST 198: HONORS HISTORY THESIS, 1 to 3 credit hrs.
Continuance of HIST 197. Under the supervision of one or more members of the History Department, honors students complete the research begun in HIST 197 and write an honors thesis (50-60 typewritten pages), in which they analyze and integrate the material uncovered in their research activities.

Other Courses

HIST 194: SELECTED TOPICS, 3 credit hrs.
An intensive examination of selected units of study. The course may focus on important historical issues, events or personalities. The course instructor will determine which level in the History curriculum (i.e., Introductory, Advanced, Colloquium, or Capstone) each individual course will count towards.

HIST 195: INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY, 1 to 6 credit hrs.
The apprenticeship enables the student to acquire experience in such history-related fields as journal editing, museum and archival work, and the collection and preservation of historical materials.

HIST 199: HISTORY INDEPENDENT STUDY, 1 to 6 credit hrs.
An opportunity for independent study with topics selected according to student interest and needs. Prereq.: Consent of the department.

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