Internships in History

The Department of History recommends an internship as elective credit for the major. Internships are the department’s service learning or experiential learning component.

Our internships range widely, according to the interests of the students. Many of our internships are related in some way to public history and have seen students working at Living History Farms, the State Historical Society of Iowa, and other local historical organizations. Some are geared more to students who have an interest in political research and have included working in various ways at the State Capitol. Other students have done internships in education-related fields such as mentoring middle school students in preparation for National History Day competitions.

The list below represents common internship opportunities but students are encouraged to design their own internships in consultation with their adviser.

The work requirements of an internship will be decided between the student, the faculty adviser and the on-site supervisor, but tend to include at least 100 on-site hours, maintaining an activity log, and meeting regularly with their on-site supervisor. Students also meet regularly with the faculty advisor to review their internship experiences, discuss readings in public history appropriate to their interests, plan and review progress on a paper (usually 8-12 pages in length) related to their special interests in public history, and consider career options open to students of history.

3+3 Drake Law School Program

Qualified students in any major in the College of Arts and Sciences can earn an undergraduate degree and a law degree in six years rather than the usual seven. Through this program, students complete three years of full-time undergraduate study, use law school courses to meet the balance of required undergraduate credits, and receive their Bachelor’s degree after the first year of law school. Visit the Drake Law School website for more information.

ArtSci News
October 20, 2016
The Comparison Project will present the third event in its 2016–2017 series on death and dying. A community interfaith dialogue on Oct. 27 will feature representatives of three different refugee religions in Des Moines.