Fall 2007

Registration memo from Dr. Sanders regarding Fall 2007 Honors Program classes

Honors 60 Legacy of Latin: Structure and Words

Honors 66 The Beatles: Popular Music and Society

Honors 092 Journalists on Screen / 1955 to Present

Honors 093 Race for the Presidency

Honors 101 Honors Orientation Group Facilitator

Honors 110 Constructing Americans: The Politics of Citizenship in the U.S.

Honors 113 Existentialism

Honors 120 Modern Political Satire

Honors 126 Philosophies of Dialogue and the Interpersonal: "In Search for the Ideal"

Honors 134 Rhetoric in Popular Culture

Honors 146 Restorative Justice

Honors 147 Race, Religion, and Civic Culture

Honors 153 Global Reproductive Politics

Honors 155 Culture, Knowledge, Power

Honors 159 Moral Truth

Honors 166 Women Intellectual Traditions

Honors 175 Feminist Anthropology

Honors 178 Music and Politics

Honors 188 Principles of Marxian Political Economy

Honors 195 Women and the Law

Honors 198 Honors Independent Study

Honors 199 Honors Senior Thesis

TO: Drake University Faculty, Staff & Students

FROM: Arthur B. Sanders, Director of Honors Program

RE: Registration for Honors Courses, Fall 2007

With an Honors Program curriculum that is continually changing, Honors Program seminars unite the diverse interests of faculty and students to explore topics that cross the boundaries of traditional disciplines. The Program's small class size and unique subjects promote independent thinking, intellectual creativity, and the courses are writing-intensive and follow a discussion –based, collaborative inquiry format. Honors Program classes are open to all motivated students, and Honors Student Council activities are generally open to the entire campus community. Student leaders are elected to Honors Executive Council leadership positions each academic year.

Questions about the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum should be directed to the Honors Program office, 271-2999, or to the Director of the Honors Program.

NOTICE: The courses are numbered as follows:

1-49: intended for first-year students

50-99: first-year students, sophomores, juniors and seniors (unless otherwise designated)

100-149: suggested for sophomores-seniors

150-197: junior-senior seminars

198: Honors Program Independent Study (or approved alternative)

199: Honors Program Senior Thesis (or approved alternative.)

Honors 060 Legacy of Latin: Structure and Words

CRN 3990
3 credits
Bruce Campbell
TR 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Course Description
Learning and studying a language involves two aspects: (1) building a sufficient vocabulary, and (2) acquiring knowledge of grammatical structure.

Vocabulary is built through using the language situationally, by working with texts, both oral and written. Latin belongs to the Indo-European language family, the same family of languages to which English belongs.  Because of Latin's long perceived position as a transmitter of Classical thought and culture, a large segment of the learned vocabulary of English is fashioned upon Latin words and roots.

The Legacy of Latin is an intensive, demanding, rapidly moving study, focusing on the vocabulary and word families, and on the morphological and syntactic structure of Latin of the Classical Period (first century BC and first century AD). Of course, Latin is not some abstract entity. For centuries it was a living language, used by real people to do things with. Any study of any language must incorporate literary and cultural aspects of the society which uses the language.

Intended Audience
This course is intended for students: first-year through seniors: who have had no previous exposure to Classical Latin (or very minimal exposure), and who are members of the Honors Program, and who feel a need or want to have some introduction to the language.

Majors/Minors/Concentrations:; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Bruce Campbell is emeritus professor of the Department of English. His interests include grammar, the history of the English language, Latin Linguistics and sylistics. He has authored Performing and Processing the Aeneid, in which he examines the style markers and characteristics of orality evident in this Latin literary epic. Bruce Campbell holds both an A.B. and an M.A. in Classics (Latin) from the State University of New York, Albany, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Rochester.

Honors 066 The Beatles: Popular Music and Society
CRN 3022
3 credits
Todd Evans
TR 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Course Description
Often referred to as the greatest rock and roll band of all times, The Beatles influence on popular music and contemporary culture is unquestionable. The societal context of the growth of Rock and Roll will serve as the framework for this course, which will chart the Beatles rapid rise to fame, their careers as a band and solo artists, and their continued impact on popular music and culture in the 21st century.

This course will provide an in-depth, record-by-record, look at the music of this extraordinary group and the unique songwriting partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Additionally, the course will explore the development of global cross-promotional marketing, as applied by the Beatles and their corporation, Apple.

Designed for non-music majors, this course will help to develop critical listening skills, and demonstrate the progression of musical concepts and themes still being applied in popular music today.

Intended Audience
The course will be open first to sophomores, then first-year students. Prerequisite: Honors 001.

Major / Minors / Concentrations: The Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Todd Evans is a Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, specializing in Electronic Media production. A self-professed "garage band rock and roller" in his youth, Evans' recent research presentations, " The Music of the Beatles and Disrupted Parental Relationships", and "Paul McCartney: Healing Wounds Through Lyrics, Images and Performance" demonstrate the timeless appeal and indefinable interest in the "greatest rock and roll band of all time."

Evans has also served as Associate Dean to the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and Director of the DrakeTeleMedia Center, during his 24-year tenure at Drake University.

Honors 092 Journalists on Screen / 1955 to Present

CRN 2995 and film viewing lab CRN 2997
Lee Jolliffe
3 credits
W 6:00-8:50 p.m. and film viewing lab hour to follow, 9:00-9:50 p.m.

Course Description
Why is reporting such a compelling subject in film and, later, on television?  What are key elements in the public's ongoing images and expectations of journalism? From the mid-1950s forward,films about reporters offer plots that are more international, more danger-filled, and more entangled in power politics and media conglomerates. This course will examine particular films and television programs keeping in mind basic issues of production values, film theories, and the structures of American film and television. American history will also provide a backdrop for the course material, as directors attempt to recount realistic and even real-life cases, from Watergate to wars in El Salvador, Nicaragua, and the Persian Gulf. Expect to see "Black Like Me," "Heat Wave," "The Year of Living Dangerously," "Under Fire," and even "Kolchak: the Night Stalker," among others.

Intended Audience
First-year and sophomore students.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum

About the Instructor
Lee Jolliffe joined the magazine sequence at Drake University in 1995. She teaches courses in visual communications, and media-related courses for the Honors Program and has written numerous papers, book chapters and scholarly articles for American Periodicals, Journalism Quarterly, Journalism History,  ETC: The Journal of General Semantics and other communication journals. Her current major project is The American Magazine: A Researcher's Bibliography, a 7,500+ entry database and book.

Honors 093 Race for the Presidency

CRN 2977
Robert Woodward
3 credits
MW 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Course Description
This course will examine the race for the American presidency in 2008 by looking at contemporary political developments and the history of campaign races. In Iowa--the site of the first-in-the-nation caucuses--Republican and Democratic candidates have been flooding the state, seeking to attract support in 2008. Candidates also are hoping to do well in New Hampshire, which holds the nation's first primary, and numerous other states planning primaries and caucuses early in the 2008 campaign season. Our course will seek (1) to have students analyze and think critically about the substantial media role in the process; (2) to provide students with an understanding of the history of the race for the presidency in previous campaigns; (3) to help students understand and investigate the relationships between political reporters and candidates; and (4) to show how the new technologies such as the Internet have altered political campaigning.

Students will be required to write brief discussion papers, short analytical papers, and a major research paper during the semester. Students also will be required to monitor media to watch how the various potential candidates are being covered.

The course will use the seminar approach.

Intended Audience
All levels. Prerequisite: Honors Orientation (1-credit class) or instructor permission.

Majors/Minors/Concentrations: Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Robert D. Woodward taught courses in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication and the Honors Program at Drake for more than 30 years. His Honors course topics include: Civil Rights in the Media; Writers and Photographers in the Natural World; Looking for America In Word, Symbol, and Image; The American Media and the Race for the Presidency; American Presidents in the Age of Television, and The Creative Process.

Before coming to Drake in 1972, Professor Woodward worked as the assistant news editor and world editor at The Washington (DC) Star where he was centrally involved in campaign news coverage. He loves newspapers, magazines, books, and anything in print, and he taught the first Internet-related course in the Honors Program at Drake in 1995 on The Internet World. He has received the Drake Service Award in 2006, the Honors Program Faculty of the Year Award 1999-2000, Levitt Mentor of the Year and the Outstanding Undergraduate Teacher of the Year awards.

Honors 101 Honors Orientation Group Facilitator

CRN 1464 AND either R-1462 OR W-1463
Arthur Sanders
2 credits
F 1:30-2:20 p.m. AND R 3:30-4:20 p.m. OR W 2:00-2:50 p.m.

Course Description
This course gives upper-division Honors Program students the opportunity to use management and leadership skills to mentor First-year students in the Honors 001 course. Students will work in pairs, acting as co-facilitators, to plan academic, service, and social activities for the scheduled individual group sessions. Also, the co-facilitators will work closely with the Director to create a learning environment that encourages intellectual curiosity, independent thinking, leadership and communication. The co-facilitators will meet with their group at least once per week, each Wednesday (or Thursday). The Honors 101 group will meet each Friday for planning and discussion Honors 001 meetings. Email will serve as the primary means of communication outside of the classroom

Students who register for this class should be active participants in the Honors Program and have sophomore, junior, or senior class standing. Enrolled students will be asked to complete and return to the Honors Program office the following information by April 16, 2007. The information can be dropped off at the Honors Program office, Medbury 206/209 or sent via e-mail to Charlene.Skidmore@drake.edu

Name:

E-mail address:

Major or areas of interest:

Des Moines Local Address and Phone Number:

Summer e-mail address and phone number(s):

  1. What do you feel Group Facilitators can provide new Honors Program students through the small group format of the Honors 1 class?
  2. What has been your most positive experience in the Honors Program?
  3. Briefly describe the most important topics or themes you would like to include in Honors 1.
  4. List your campus activities in order of personal importance.
  5. What qualities do you possess which would be important for a Group Facilitator?
  6. Please indicate which of the small group section times work best in your schedule. If you are available at the alternate time, please list that day and time as well.

You may request to be paired with an Honors student who is available at the same time (for either the Wednesday or Thursday Honors Orientation Class section). Co-Facilitator pairs will be assigned based on the needs of the Honors Program office and only after the June New Student course registration sessions have been completed.

Majors /Minors / Concentrations: This course may be combined with Honors 001 to count for 3 credits towards Honors Program (Track) requirements.

Please request the waiver form from the Honors Office if you anticipate going over 18 credit hours. This form requires your signature as well as the signature of Dr. Arthur Sanders, 212 Meredith Hall.

About the Instructor
Arthur Sanders is Professor of Politics, Department Chair and Director of the Honors Program. He has written a number of books and articles about the American political system.

Honors 110 Constructing Americans: The Politics of Citizenship in the U.S.

CRN 2978
Joanna Mosser
3 credits
TR 2:00-3:15 p.m.

Course Description
This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the politics of membership in the U.S. We begin, in Part I, by exploring theories of citizenship and political identity. How are political communities constructed and maintained? How do political theorists understand the origins and requirements of membership in particular political communities? In Part II, we apply our discussion of theories of citizenship to the American political community itself, exploring how American political culture and judicial decisions have structured access to U.S. citizenship, with particular emphasis on the historical role that racial, class, and gender distinctions have shaped access to full "member" status. In Part III, we explore how American public policy shapes understandings of the rights and duties of membership. We focus, in particular, on welfare, crime, and education policy and efforts to privatize "public" functions. How do policy interventions of this sort shape our understanding of the rights and obligations of citizenship? How do public policy decisions shape our understandings of what "membership" and "American-ness" require? Finally, in Part IV, we discuss the future of membership-politicking in the U.S., exploring contemporary theoretical and policy debates about multiculturalism and diversity, immigration control, and the fate of democratic citizenship in an "Age of Terror." Our discussion, throughout, is informed by readings from law, political theory, public policy, and sociology.

Intended Audience
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior level.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations:  Cross-listed with POLS 158 (CRN 2999); the Honors Program of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Joanna Mosser is assistant professor of politics.  Her research and teaching interests include American politics and political institutions (federalism, in particular), American public policy, public administration, and state and local politics.

Honors 113 Existentialism

CRN 2985
Allen Scult
MW 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Course Description
The existentialist—or so called existentialist— philosophers refused to have their approach categorized, defined, or, perhaps most irritating to them, classified as a "school." This antipathy to being grouped together in any way reflects one of the commitments common to all of the existentialists—freedom. Other common themes include alienation, authenticity, rebellion, and the importance of choice. Much of existentialism is also atheistic, with the notable exception of the so called "founder" of existentialism, Soren Kierkegaard.

But whatever their attitude towards the possibility of there being a god, existentialists see human beings as essentially alone in the world without any prior definition of who they are. This is the meaning of that famous saying of existentialism, "Existence precedes essence." In the words of one of the most influential of the existentialists, Jean Paul Sartre:

What is meant here by saying that existence precedes essence? It means first of all.
Man exists, turns up, appears on the scene, and, only afterwards. defines himself. . .
Not only is man what he conceives himself to be, but he is also only what he wills
himself to be after this thrust towards existence.

What sort of philosophy is possible with such an apparently nihilistic world-view? Where does philosophy begin without any starting point beyond where each of us is, right now? What sort of ethics is possible in such a world (a world about which Dostoievsky famously said: "If God didn't exists, everything would be possible.")?

These questions will be at the center of the course. By the end, hopefully we will be further along the path that begins with these questions. Or maybe we won't. In this case we will be in good company. But however our investigation turns out, along the way, we will study the most influential and interesting philosophers and artists ( Some like Sartre and Camus were both) whose sense of things was primarily existentialist. Our study will include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Unamuno, Marcel, Sarte, Camus, Jaspers Heidegger, Simone de Beauvoir, and Hannah Arendt. Existentialism also worked its way into psychotherapy, theater and film We will try to extend our study in these directions as well.

This is primarily a reading seminar. This means that the majority of the work will be reading, responding to and discussing texts. Your responses will be written for the most part, not only to give us a basis for discussion in class, but also as a way of making your reading more meaningful. There will also be three short papers.

Intended Audience
This course is appropriate for Juniors and Seniors with some prior experience in philosophy and a serious interest in thinking.
The prerequisites for the course are at least one prior philosophy course or permission of instructor.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Philosophy 131 (CRN 2894). Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Professor Allen Scult, has spent a number of years studying Heidegger, his teachers and his students, and has given numerous conference presentations and published numerous essays on the subject.

Honors 120 Modern Political Satire

CRN 3099
Rachel Paine Caufield
3 credits
T 6:00-8:50 p.m.

Course Description
The intent of satire is to correct society by poking fun at it. Satirists use sarcasm, irony, ridicule, etc, in denouncing, exposing, or deriding vice, folly, abuses or evils of any kind (Hodgart, pg. 7). The most common object of satire is, for obvious reasons, government.

Because satire can only be effective if its consumers have a fairly sophisticated understanding of the social and political context it addresses, the class will focus on modern (post-WWII) American political satire. Although satire has a rich history in literature (particularly English and Irish literature of the late 18th Century), today it appears in many forms ñ from satirical novels to musical theatre to episodes of The Simpsons and South Park to the performance art of the Guerilla Girls. In short, satire has found a home in nearly every medium of modern society. Moreover, the objects of modern satire cover every topic of current political debate: political personalities, social policy, foreign policy, and economic policy.

This class is designed to closely examine the role of satire as a means of social and political change. As such, we will examine not only various forms of modern political satire, but we will also address the following questions: How does satire differ from other forms of political humor and/or commentary? Is all satire political satire? What motivates people to use satire rather than other forms of social protest? What is the relationship between satirists and the society in which they live? What (or who) are the most frequent objects of political satire and why? What rhetorical tools are most often used by satirists (for example, how are utopian and dystopian conditions used as satirical tools)? Is satire an effective means of change? Why or why not?

The class is designed to be heavily discussion oriented. Classroom teaching materials will include a collection of political/editorial cartoons, essays and commentaries from online sources like The Onion, segments from Saturday Night Live, The Daily Show, The Simpsons, South Park, and other TV shows, and musical recordings including a performance of The Capitol Steps and the Broadway musicals Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1978) and Urinetown (2001). In addition, students will read both scholarly analyses and satirical fiction and view movies (such as Dr. Strangelove, Bulworth, Bob Roberts, and Wag the Dog) outside of class.

Taken as a whole, the goal is to prompt students to critically assess the value and efficacy of political satire in a democratic society.

Intended Audience
The class is intended for first-year students, sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Honors Program Track of Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Rachel Paine Caufield is Associate Professor of Politics having joined the faculty in the fall of 2001. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Political Science at The George Washington University and her B.A. in Mathematics and Political Science from Hood College in Frederick, MD, minoring in social science research and women's studies. Her teaching and research interests focus on American political institutions, including judicial politics, legislative politics, and the American presidency as well as inter-branch relationships and empirical research methods. She has also served as a Visiting Fellow at The Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. She has long been fascinated by political satire as a method of social commentary and political protest.

Honors 126 Philosophies of Dialogue and the Interpersonal: "In Search for the Ideal"

CRN 2287
Allen Scult
3 credits
TR 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Course Description
The course will focus on the question: What is communication like when it's at its best, when we are most effectively utilizing our capacity as human beings to communicate? In the field of Rhetoric and Communication, the ideal is often referred to as communicating at the level of the "Inter-personal." In philosophy, the term used to describe the ideal is "Dialogue." Though these terms come from different academic traditions and so reflect some different ways of thinking and talking about things, I believe these different versions of the ideal can be brought into interesting and fruitful conversation, and so I have joined them together in this course. This "joining together" will not only give us a wide variety of perspectives from which to draw in our search for the ideal, but will also give us the opportunity to explore, better understand, and contrast various methodological approaches to the study of human communication.

We will focus especially on the relationship between self and other, for that is where the problems and possibilities of human communication are worked out. What is the "self"? Who is the "other"? How might we negotiate a relationship between self and other which "works" and at the same time shows "care" about the identity and the integrity of each?

Some of the theorists and philosophers of communication we will study include Paul Watzlawick, George Herbert Mead, SÆren Kierkegaard, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Emmanuel Levinas, Maurice Blanchot, Richard Rorty, Kenneth Burke, and Martin Buber.

Any questions about the course, please contact
Professor Allen Scult
Tel. 2869
e-mail: allen.scult@drake.edu

Intended Audience
Sophomore, Junior and Senior level.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Philosophy 100 (CRN 2280); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instuctor
Allen Scult is National Endowment Professor of Humanities, Professor of Philosophy and Rhetoric, and recipient of the 2003-04 Centennial Scholar Award at Drake University. One of his main philosophical interests is investigating how human beings use language to interpret and understand their world.

Honors 134 Rhetoric in Popular Culture

CRN 3064
Joan Faber-McAlister
3 credits
MW 2:00-3:15 pm

Course Description
Rhetoric in Popular Culture is a course that critically examines how the signs and symbols we all encounter in daily life work to shape our cultural practices, our political commitments, and even our social identities. By learning to analyze common cultural texts, objects, and spaces through the lens of rhetoric, students will reflect on how particular ideas, values, attitudes, and actions can appeal to publics to become social norms. Examining how these cultural rhetorics operate will also afford students opportunities to consider the consequences of these influences as well as the possibilities for social change.

The primary text for this course will be Rhetoric in Popular Culture by Barry Brummet (2nd edition), which will be supplemented with some selected articles. The course will be writing-intensive and require students to play an active role in their own learning. Students will write in preparation for class meetings, serve as discussion leaders, work on a group project, present research to the class, and craft an original essay. The specific assignments will include regular reading responses posted on Blackboard, reviewing posts and preparing an outline to lead class discussion, researching and presenting a group project that analyzes visual texts through a particular method of rhetorical criticism, chapter quizzes, midterm and final exams, and a final critical essay. The course will be capped at 20 students to meet Honors guidelines and elevate participation in class discussions.

Intended Audience
Given the challenging nature of the course topics and tasks and the emphasis on the critical analysis of specific discourses, students will be required to have completed SCSR 024: Rhetoric as a Liberal Art prior to taking Rhetoric in Popular Culture. Honors and SCS students who have not completed SCSR 024, but can demonstrate an ability to meet the demands of the course, may obtain the instructor's permission to waive this pre-requisite.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCSR 134 (CRN 1966) and SCS 150 (CRN 2996); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Joan Faber McAlister earned her B.A. in Anthropology and her M.A. in Communication Studies from Boise State University and has a Ph.D. in Rhetorical Studies from the University of Iowa. Joan's research interests include domestic space, suburban culture, visual rhetorics, aesthetic theory, identity politics, and the performance of class, race, gender and sexuality in daily life. Joan has taught a variety of courses in communication and rhetoric, addressing such topics as argumentation, aesthetics, campaign politics, communication theory, rhetorical criticism, and public address.

Honors 146 Restorative Justice

CRN 2927
Nancy Berns
3 credits
M 5:00-7:50 p.m.

Course Description
Restorative justice is a perspective that views crime as a harm against people and the community, which needs to be addressed through the involvement of offenders, victims, and the community. This course provides an introduction to the principles and practices behind restorative justice. A restorative justice movement has been growing dramatically globally in the past couple of decades. Along with this growth come many challenges, pitfalls, and critics. The course is designed to allow students to struggle along with the experts in trying to navigate the opportunities and challenges, the success stories and the pitfalls that accompany restorative justice programs. In the process, students will explore questions about justice, crime, imprisonment, punishment, rehabilitation, forgiveness, and the purpose of a legal system. The course relies heavily on international perspectives to learn about these issues.

Intended Audience
Honors Program: Jr and Sr level.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: This course is cross-listed with Sociology; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Nancy Berns is an associate professor of sociology. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Berns teaches courses on gendered violence, social problems, media constructions, criminology, restorative justice, and youth and crime.

Honors 147 Race, Religion, and Civic Culture

CRN 3023
Jennifer Harvey
3 credits
MW 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Course Description
This honors seminar will engage students in exploring how race and religion have been, and remain, powerful venues of human activity in the United States. We will develop a broad understanding of critical race theories, which argue that race is a social construct. We will, then, use this understanding as a lens through which to explore ways religion has contributed to the construction of race and racial identities in select moments of U.S. history. This exploration will take into account how religious activity has created and maintained racial stratification, as well as how it has undermined stratification by fueling resistance movements for justice. Throughout the course emphasis will be on Caucasian, African American and Native American communities. Through a combination of lectures, discussion, readings and research, students will be encouraged to develop critical tools for recognizing and accessing the impact of race and religion on civic culture in the United States. Students will also be encouraged to pursue and to develop "expertise" in a topic of their own choosing that pertains to matters of religion and race in the United States.

Intended Audience
Juniors and seniors only; sophomores with permission of the instructor.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-Listed with Religion 118 (CRN 2906); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Jennifer Harvey is assistant professor of religion. She moved to Drake from Brooklyn, New York where she was involved in cross-racial dialogue and organizing against police brutality. Her recently completed Ph.D. is in Christian social ethics and her most recent research has been on movements for reparations for slavery and struggles for sovereignty by Native American peoples.

Honors 153 Global Reproductive Politics

CRN 2928
Sandra Patton-Imani
3 credits
T 4:00-6:50 p.m.

Course Description
This course will explore reproductive practices, policies, and politics throughout the world. We will consider local practices of human reproduction and production--the bearing and raising of children--in a transnational context, exploring the ways power relations shape social practices of family formation across the globe in varying ways. We will consider this issue through a range of interdisciplinary sources including media, literature, ethnography, history, and public policy. The course will address such issues as sexuality, birth control, pregnancy, abortion, adoption, and child rearing in the context of particular social and cultural traditions as they are affected by global power relations.

Intended Audience
This course is intended for sophomore level or higher.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCS-Sociology 150 (CRN 2991) and WS 145 (3088); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Sandi Patton-Imani is an Associate Professor of American Studies in the Department for the Study of Culture and Society. She received her Ph.D. in American Studies, University of Maryland, College Park, a Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies, University of Maryland, College Park, and is currently teaching Sociology and Women's Studies. Her previous teaching experience includes: Women's Studies and African American Studies, Macalester College; Women's Studies, University of Minnesota; Women's Studies, University of Maryland College Park; Women's Studies University of Maryland, Baltimore County; and Afro-American Studies, University of Maryland, College Park.

Honors  155 Culture, Knowledge, Power

CRN 2963
Joseph Schneider
3 credits
MW 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Course Description
The last two decades of the twentieth century witnessed a variety of challenges to conventional disciplinary thought and practice in the humanities and the human and social sciences of western scholarship. Many of these involved a critical rethinking of usual understandings of culture, knowledge, and power, at the least.  This course aims to introduce students to themes, questions, and ways of reading, writing, and speaking that may be loosely referred to as "post-" thought, analysis, and criticism that has constituted a major part of this challenge. Influences from French post-structuralism, cultural Marxism, feminism, psychoanalytic criticism, postcolonial studies, queer theory, and science/knowledge studies is reviewed. Students will be asked to consider the emergence of these critical perspectives and practices relative to established and dominant ways of thinking and writing/speaking defined by existing disciplinary knowledges inside as well as outside the academy.

The following themes/perspectives will be central in the course:

  • The Importance of Discursive Practice
  • Reality as Socially Constructed
  • Reflexivity and Knowledge
  • Understanding Power
  • Difference
  • Theory as Resource for Activism
  • Ethics of Activism

Intended Audience
This course is intended for students who have at least 30 hours of prior course credit/sophomore standing.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Study of Culture and Society (Sociology) Cross-listed with SCS 110 (CRN 1973); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Joseph Schneider is Ellis and Nelle Levitt Professor of Sociology. He is interested in the sociology of knowledge and science and has published a paper or two on this question along with a recent short book on feminist science studies scholar Dona Haraway (Donna Haraway: Live Theory, Continuum, 2005). He has taught Honors Program courses titled "Science, Cyborgs, and Monsters," "Technoscience, Culture and Practice," and he has led numerous travel study seminars to China. He has been influenced in his thinking most importantly by the debates in "post" issues of all sorts and by recent writings in feminism, reflexivity, and ethnography.

Honors 159 Moral Truth

CRN 3007
Jennifer McCrickerd
3 credits
TR 12:30.-1:45 p.m.

Course Description
"Honesty is good." "Murder is wrong."  Are these statements capable of being true or false similar to statements about astronomy or mathematics? Or are they expressions of personal taste or opinion similar to statements about whether chocolate is good?  Or something else? More importantly, given our options for action, how do we decide to behave? This course is a study of the discussions in analytic philosophy about the meaning (or lack thereof) of moral statements in addition to discussions about moral reasoning. We discuss whether moral statement can be true or false, justified or unjustified and what implications on moral reasoning and theory follow from the different answers.

The purpose of this course is to continue development of critical thinking, speaking and writing skills as well as to familiarize students with 20th century discussions in analytic philosophy regarding the possibility and nature of moral truth and moral reasoning. Additionally, we will discuss in what way these highly theoretical discussions are relevant to everyday life and decisions or decision-making. By the end of the semester students should have a good understanding of the different positions taken and their associated arguments. Students should be capable of having intelligent and informed conversations on these topics with people who have not taken the class.

Student's ability to understand and critically examine the course material will be assessed in a variety of formats. This will likely include class participation, posts on BlackBoard, and papers.

Intended Audience
This course is intended for sophomores, juniors and seniors who have had at least one upper-level course that emphasized critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

Majors / Minors / Concentration: Cross-listed with Phil 128 (CRN 2893); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Dr. Jennifer McCrickerd is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Philosophy and Religion Department. Prior to joining the Drake faculty in 1994, she attended Wellesley College (B.A.), and Washington University (M.A., Ph.D.) Professor McCrickerd's research is in the area of health and social justice and moral education. She has done extensive work on Rawls' Theory of Justice and is currently interested in the area of Health and Social Justice. She was also named 2003-2004 Honors Teacher of the Year.

Honors 166 Women Intellectual Traditions


CRN 3043
Deb Symonds
3 credits
W 3:00-5:50 p.m.

Course Description
Readings in the work of women intellectuals, and their male colleagues, particularly addressing woman's nature, God, and political rights, over approximately the last three thousand years, starting with the mysterious J at the court of King Solomon, and ending with the American Zora Neale Hurston.

Intended Audience
Junior and Senior level.

Major / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with History 166 (CRN 3121); Women's Studies 195 (CRN 2272); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Deborah Symonds is Associate Professor of History. Her field is early modern Europe, which is Europe from the late middle ages (about 1400) to 1800. This period includes the formation of centralized states, the development of agricultural capitalism -- which people nowadays might call big business farming -- and Europe's contact with other continents. In Europe, it is a period which includes a lot of stress, from economic changes, new intellectual and scientific ideas, and political struggles -- it culminates in revolutions, in France and in Britain's North American colonies, and the birth of new social, economic, and political models. She deals with the nasty stresses of change, before it finally took shape for people as "revolution." The witch hunts were one of those symptoms of change, anger, fear, and frustration -- increasing rates of infanticide were another.

Honors  175         Feminist Anthropology

CRN 2268
Sandya Hewamanne
3 credits
TR 2:00-3:15 p.m.

Course Description
Is female to male as nature is to culture? Are women subordinated to men cross culturally and through time? Should studies on men and masculinities be part of a feminist Anthropology course?

This course will examine cultural constructions of gender from a cross-cultural perspective in trying to tackle these questions. We will examine through texts, videos and other material from popular culture, the ways in which individuals and societies reproduce, negotiate, perform and contest dominant gender ideologies and identities. Focusing on feminist practice, positionality, performance and queer theories, we will examine the importance of feminist analytical perspective in anthropology. Bringing diverse voices from varied cultural spaces we will look at how women negotiate social control, globalization, empowerment, socio-cultural change and collective political action in diverse ways.

Intended Audience
This course is intended for juniors and seniors.

Prerequisites: one sociology or anthropology entry-level class, or instructor permission.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCSA 101 (CRN 1963); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Sandya Hewamanne is Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Department of the Study of Culture and Society. Her research interests are globalization, transnational production, identity and cultural politics and feminist and postcolonial theory. She previously taught at University of Colombo, Sri Lanka, University of Texas at Austin and Hartwick College.

Honors 178 Music and Politics

CRN 1892
Eric Saylor
3 credits
MW 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Course Description
This class will examine different ways in which music and politics intersect and interact. This will involve the study of many topics, including (but not limited to) reception history (i.e., ways in which music may be intentionally or unintentionally politicized by audiences), legal directives (particularly censorship laws and conventions), how patronage may determine how and what kind of music is written, ways in which music helps articulate facets of identity (including racial, religious, gender, or national identity), how music may act as a socio-political critique, and the role of music as propaganda.

Since this is a seminar course, students should expect to participate extensively in discussion of the readings, assigned listenings, and topics under discussion each class period. Students will also be assigned a series of short papers over the course of the term that considers the readings or subjects for the week in greater depth. A final project/presentation will also be required, in which students will find examples of the issues discussed over the course of the term in contemporary society, and explain the issues surrounding their manifestation. We will be looking at works from both the western art tradition (particularly opera) and various popular streams including excerpts from the following texts, among others:

  • Running With the Devil: Power, Gender, and Madness in Heavy Metal Music, Robert Walser
  • Selections from Music and the Politics of Culture , ed. Christopher Norris
  • Music in the Third Reich , Erik Levi
  • Selections from National Music and Other Essays , Ralph Vaughan Williams
  • On Socialist Realism , Abram Tertz [Andrei Sinyavsky]
  • Swing Changes: Big Band Jazz in New Deal America, David Stowe
  • Parental Advisory: Music Censorship in America, Eric Nuzum
  • "Islam and Music: The Legal and Spiritual Dimensions," Sayyed Nasr, in Enchanting Powers: Music in the World's Religions, ed. Lawrence Sullivan

Intended Audience
This class is intended for juniors and seniors of any major, and may be extended to music majors at the sophomore level. Musical literacy or performance experience may be helpful, but is not required.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with MUS 160 (CRN 1861); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Eric Saylor is Assistant Professor of Musicology and Music History. His area of specialization is twentieth-century British music, with particular interest in how composers' conception of nation affects the way they write and the way others perceive their music. Dr. Saylor is not a political scientist, but he knows a few, and holds various and sundry opinions on the nature of politics and culture that will likely get him into trouble one of these days. Much to his surprise, he was awarded the 2004 Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award for the College of Arts and Sciences.

Honors 188 Principles of Marxian Political Economy

CRN 3004
Ismael Hossein-zadeh
3 credits
W 6:00-8:50 p.m.

Course Description
Marxian economics is one of the most important, yet one of the most neglected, schools of economic thought. This negligence is largely due to a widespread misconception that Marxian economic theory is about communist economics, or that it represents the theoretical basis for the centrally-planned economies of the ex-Soviet type countries. Our study in this course will show, however, that his work contains very little that is helpful to a communist economy, or to a centrally-planned economy, because Marx chose to devote almost all his attention to the capitalist economy, seeking to explain the principles of its evolution, its strengths, and its weaknesses. The course will examine major Marxian economic theories and categories such as

  • the theory of value, surplus value, and exploitation,
  • money and the fetishism of commodities,
  • conditions for reproduction and expansion of capitalism,
  • technological innovations and economic growth,
  • the nature of economic crisis under capitalism,
  • globalization and interdependence of markets,
  • economic determinants of imperialism, and the like.

We will also discuss Marxian theories of social classes, of control and alienation, of state structure and civil institutions, and of nationalism, fascism, and militarism.

Intended Audience
This course is intended for juniors and seniors.

This class is also listed as Econ 162. Students who enroll in this class as Econ 162 can still count it toward the Honors Track of the Drake Curriculum. Students who have taken Econ 001 and Econ 002 may register under either listing. Students without Econ 001 and Econ 002 should register under the Honors listing – however if no space remains in the Honors listing but there is space in the Econ listing, you can see Professor Hossein-Zadeh for a waiver to enroll in Econ 162.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Econ 162 (CRN 2954); Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Ismael Hossein-Zadeh is Professor of Economics at Drake University. He teaches classes in developing economies, international economics, macroeconomics, and comparative economic systems. His areas of research include international debt, the political economy of war and militarism, and economic determinants of the relationship between the Muslim world and the West.

Honors 195 Women and the Law

CRN 1162
Sally Frank
3 credits
T 3:00-4:40 p.m.

Course Description
This seminar reviews how sex role understandings have affected various aspects of the law, including criminal law; abortion and fetal protection; family law; and lesbian and gay rights. Standards of review for laws that discriminate on the basis of sex as opposed to other kinds of discrimination also are discussed, as Is the issue of how women are treated in courts today with an eye toward students' future practice as lawyers.

Intended Audience
This course is intended for juniors, and seniors as well as current Drake Law students. There are no course prerequisites.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Women's Studies; Law, Politics and Society. Cross-listed with WS 195 (CRN 1886) and LAW 301 (CRN 1426). Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Sally Frank, Professor of Law, studies Women's Rights and also brought and won a landmark sex discrimination case against Princeton University and its all-male eating clubs. Her publication "Eve Was Right to Eat the 'Apple': The Importance of Narrative to the Art of Lawyering," Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, is a re-examination of the Eve narrative that proposes criminal defenses that Eve might have used. Professor Frank organizes and provides representation for survivors of domestic violence, and she is an activist with peace organizations.

Honors 198 Honors Independent Study
Honors 199 Honors Senior Thesis

Interested students and faculty advisors for honors independent studies or senior theses should direct their questions to Dr. Arthur sanders, Honors Program Director. The preliminary agreement to enroll form is available in the Honors Program office of the Director (Meredith Hall, room 212) and must be submitted to Dr. Sanders before enrollment is allowed in the course. Course proposal forms (and senior thesis grant forms) are available in the Honors Program office as well. Students are asked to prepare a 1-2 page proposal summary and submit it, with the appropriate form, to the faculty project mentor and to the Honors Program Director for their signatures of approval. The form is due within three weeks of the start of the semester. Students will be asked to present their findings at a student/faculty forum held prior to the student's graduation.

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University News
November 25, 2014
The Drake University College of Business and Public Administration is accepting applications for certificate programs that allow students and working professionals to add advanced credentials to their resumes without pursuing a degree.
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