Spring 2007

TO: Drake University Faculty, Staff, & Students

FROM: Arthur B. Sanders, Director of Honors Program

DATE: October 20, 2006

RE: Registration for Honors Courses, Spring 2007

With an Honors Program curriculum that is continually changing, Honors Program seminars unite the diverse interests of faculty and students to explore topics that cross the boundaries of traditional disciplines. The Program's small class size and unique subjects promote independent thinking, intellectual creativity, and the courses are writing-intensive and follow a discussion based, collaborative inquiry format. Honors Program classes are open to all motivated students, and Honors Student Council activities are generally open to the entire campus community. Student leaders are elected to Honors Executive Council leadership positions each academic year.

Questions about the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum should be directed to the Honors Program office, 271-2999, or to the Director of the Honors Program.

NOTICE: The courses are numbered as follows:

1-49: intended for first-year students

50-99: first-year students, sophomores, juniors and seniors (unless otherwise designated)

100-149: suggested for sophomores-seniors

150-189 : junior-senior seminars

198: Honors Program Independent Study (or approved alternative)

199: Honors Program Senior Thesis (or approved alternative.)

Honors 071Global Social Change

Darcie Vandegrift
CRN 2570
3 credits
MW 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Globalization and economic development are two concepts that are interconnected, constructed through similar historical and social contexts of unequal power relations. There are many definitions of development and globalization, which we will discuss over the course of the semester. Both words are typically understood as something positive, and something that "we" in the United States have that "they" do not. Development practices typically involve changing societies through technology, knowledge, and institutions created by the Global North (the U.S., Canada, Japan, and Europe) and envisioned as a kind of salvation for the Global South. Globalization also imagines the interconnection and rapid flow of ideas, people, commodities and capital as a largely positive, unidirectional, capitalist phenomenon in which "we" and "they" will integrate into a globalized order that will provide benefits for all. In this class, we will examine critiques of the dominant understandings of development and globalization. Our class will also spend considerable time studying current and imagined alternative development(s) and globalization(s).

The biggest requirement for this course is a commitment to understanding the perspectives of the theorists and critics who interrogate dominant definitions of development and globalization. Often, statements about the Global South when discussing development or globalization reflect more the speakers' relationship to power and knowledge than any actual conditions of actual people and places. Also, often omitted from discussions on the Global North and South are relational power issues, e.g., how policies and prosperity in one region affect others. We will examine developmentalism and corporate globalization as ideologies. In studying development, we will examine the key sociological paradigms to describe economic development in the Global South. We will also explore issues of development through fiction. To focus on globalization, we will study some of the emergent dilemmas and possibilities of globalization, as well as the shifting roles of global institutions, corporations, and the nation-state. Central to the entire course is an emphasis on those who imagine alternatives to the dominant ways of thinking and doing globalization and economic development. Prior knowledge about the Third World or sociology is not necessary, but both are welcome.

This class centralizes the case method, fiction, and activism as a way of examining issues surrounding development. We will participate in several case studies, read a novel, and explore activism around some of the key topics. The semester will culminate with an option to construct a case study, a short story, or a group activist project.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is intended for sophomores and juniors, but others are welcome. The following prerequisites exist: an entry-level sociology, anthropology or culture and society course (except public speaking) or permission of instructor.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCSS 072 (CRN 2318); Sociology, Culture & Society, Anthropology, International Relations; the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Darcie Vandegrift is an assistant professor of sociology. Her scholarship focuses on how individuals experience, interpret and resist the consequences of economic globalization, as well as to the labels imposed by outsiders about whether their society is "developed," "developing" or "underdeveloped." After doing research and teaching in China, Russia, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica, she believes Americans should be much more concerned about how recent events are causing the rest of the world to label us. It's not pretty.


Honors 072 Modern Spiritual Masters: A Dialogue with Life in the 20thCentury

Jim Laurenzo
CRN 1388
3 credits
TR 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

"At its best our age is an age of searchers and discoverers, and at its worst, an age that has domesticated despair and learned to live with it happily." Flannery O'Connor

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The masters, who will be studied in this course, Flannery O'Connor, Albert Schweitzer, Sadhu Sundar Singh, and Dorothee Soelle each engaged their lives in a spiritual journey shaped by the influences and concerns of the 20th century. These influences and concerns continue to impact our lives into the 21st century: the history lived, the challenges of modern science, the "discovery" of religious pluralism, the impact of secularism, and the quest for social justice. There is a great variety in the main four voices to be studied throughout this course, recognizing their connections (and ours) to so many other subjects and events that have concerned us during the 20th and now 21st century. Emphasis will be placed on the biography of each writer and the collected works of these four voices in approximately 4 week-blocks of time, with an immersion in their writings, commentaries on them, and connections with other social,historical, political events, happenings and personages.

There is much variety here: O'Connor was a Catholic novelist and writer of unusual short stories; Schweitzer was a theologian, doctor, Nobel Peace Prize winner and missionary doctor in Africa; Singh was a Sikh whose beggar-like existence probed the essence of the gospel Soelle was a Protestant, political theologian, feminist, devout mystic, penetrating thinker and tender poet.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is intended for students who want to engage a wider level of discussion, spiritual and religious wise, but also history wise.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Religion; the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Jim Laurenzo is pastor of the Drake Catholic Student Center and professor adjunct for Drake's Philosophy and Religion Department. Before this, he spent seven years as Adult Education Director for the Catholic Diocese of Des Moines where, although he abhors winter, he helped direct the ecumenical program, January Thaw (which in Des Moines is a lie). He has also taught during the summer for Grandview, Creighton and Mercy School of Nursing -- because Iowa summers are dreadful weather too. "Why not spend time inside, studying and learning and discussing the bigger questions of life?"

Honors 078 Public Intellectuals

Arthur Sanders
CRN 2306
3 credits
TR 11:00 a.m - 12:15 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
In this class, we will take a look at the role that public intellectuals have played and could play in contemporary American society. While we will begin the class by looking at the history of public intellectuals in America, our primary focus will be on the role that these individuals have played over the past twenty years. We will focus on four different areas, race, science, the "new conservatism" and gender, reading and thinking about the ideas of a prominent public intellectual in each of these areas. And we will think about whether or not the development of the World Wide Web and the Internet makes these people obsolete - or more important than ever before. Hopefully, some of what we read will inspire you, some of it will infuriate you, and some will cause you to rethink some things that you "know" are true.

Readings: We will be reading The Public Intellectual: Between Philosophy and Politics, a collection of essays that discusses the role of public intellectuals, and Public Intellectuals: An Endangered Species? a collection of essays that examines whether or not public intellectuals have lost their way. In addition, in each of the four areas, we will read a collection of essays by a single pubic intellectual. I am leaning toward the following people, race: Cornell West; science: Robert Ehrlich; conservatism: George Will; and gender: Gloria Steinem, though those assignments are subject to change.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is intended for first-year students and sophomores.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Arthur Sanders is Professor of Politics and International Relations and Director of the Honors Program. He has written a number of books and articles about the American political system. He just completed a book about the presidential election process and is working on a study of the role of money in elections and policy-making here in Iowa. All of his writing on American politics has been concerned with how ordinary citizens can (or do) participate in our political world, and thus, he has a strong interest in the writings of public intellectuals and their role in fostering public, democratic debate.

Honors 084 Writers and Photographers

Robert Woodward
CRN 1368
3 credits
MW 11:00 a.m - 12:15 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course grows out of Professor Woodward's longtime interest in and study of media; writing and photography; and the natural world. The course will examine how writers and photographers have interpreted the natural world--using classic works, newspaper and magazine writing concerning nature, photographs, and digital presentations on the World Wide Web. The goal will be to provide students with a broader understanding and appreciation of the wealth of media concerning the natural world; to study how naturalists have devoted their lifetimes to exploring the world of nature; and to instill in students what could become a lifelong love of exploring the natural world. Students will be asked to study Professor Woodward's "Save the Monarch" Web site at /monarch, where they will see writings, photographs, and a digital nature art gallery (/monarch/digitalnature.html).

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Open to all honors students. However, ten seats will be reserved for first-year students.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Robert Woodward received the Drake Service Award, 2006, Honors Program Faculty of the Year Award, 1999-2000, Levitt Mentor of the Year and the Outstanding Undergraduate Teacher of the Year awards. For the past ten years, Professor Woodward has posted daily Web journals on the monarch migrations during each fall.


Honors 088 Theology of Lord of The Rings

Dale Partick
CRN 1254
3 credits
TR 2:00 p.m - 3:15 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
In this course we will focus on the fantasy epic narrative by Tolkien comprised of the six books of the Lord of the Rings.  We will also explore other scholarly writings and the recent movie adaptation to assist us in recognizing the theological ideas being communicated to the reader and shaping the narrative

In the Lord of the Rings, Tolkien's fantasy world predates Christianity and does not include any explicit references to Jewish or Christian doctrines. However, theological concepts out of those traditions undergird that narrative, and pre-Christian beliefs and practices that would violate the structures of the Christian faith are notably avoided. It will be our task to carefully study the narrative so that we can locate ideas embedded in the text that correspond to ideas that are actually found in the theological tradition. Then, our examination of the recent movie adaptation will serve as a secondary interpretation of the written material and will lead to a discussion about whether it is faithful to the text and whether it displays the same theology.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
All levels.

Majors /Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Rel 088 (CRN 1371); the Honors Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Dr. Dale Patrick is Professor of Religion and Centennial Scholar Award Winner. He writes about this course: "If you have doubts about the reading of narrative for its theology, let me remind you that Biblical scholars do so constantly. I have certainly been uncovering theology embedded in narrative (as well as oracles and psalms) in my Bible courses. One of the attractions of this course for me is the opportunity to practice my art on a text which readers do not regard as sacred; their minds may be freer to explore a text which gives them pleasure but is not invested with saving power."

Honors 100 Paths to Knowledge

Lisa West-Norwood and Angela Battle
CRN 2469
4 credits
R 6:00 p.m - 8:50 p.m AND Discussion lab (CRN 2470); Meeting time TBA
NB* Class will include 4 field trips each on a weekend day, that will constitute part of lab time.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is an interdisciplinary course focusing on different modes of reasoning and inquiry (i.e., "paths to knowledge") in the sciences and the humanities. It should help us to better navigate our way through an increasingly information- and knowledge-saturated society. In pursuing this aim, we will explore the modes of reasoning and inquiry that are typically employed in the production of various forms of knowledge. Among the questions we will examine are: Why do we seek knowledge? How is knowledge created? How should we judge the value and validity of knowledge claims? How should society make decisions about the uses to which knowledge is put? In seeking answers to these questions, we hope to hone those critical and analytical skills that will allow us to become sophisticated producers/consumers of creative output.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is open to sophomore, juniors, and seniors with priority given to students completing the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: required course for the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS
Associate Professor Angela Battle teaches all levels of painting in the Department of Art and Design. She holds the terminal degree of Master of Fine Arts in Painting from the University of New Mexico and with a bachelors degree in biology, her professional interests in the intersections of art, nature and science are reflected not only in her own beeswax paintings but in the teaching of such courses as Microcosm/Macrocosm (a art and natural history course) and the summer interim offering of landscape art and travel to the Badlands.

Dr. Lisa West Norwood is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English. She received her BA in English and Environmental Studies from Williams College and a PhD in American Literature from Stanford University. Her primary interests are in early American literary culture, 18th and 19th century women writers, and nature writing, and writings on 'place'. In her courses, students can expect an interdisciplinary focus, exposure to popular writings of the past, and a dedication to the close readings of texts through a variety of methodologies.

Honors 100 Paths to Knowledge

Carol Spaulding-Kruse
CRN 688
4 credits
MW 12:30 p.m - 1:45 p.m AND Discussion lab hour TBA, CRN (761)

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is an interdisciplinary course focusing on different modes of reasoning and inquiry (i.e., "paths to knowledge") in the sciences and the humanities. It should help us to better navigate our way through an increasingly information- and knowledge-saturated society. In pursuing this aim, we will explore the modes of reasoning and inquiry that are typically employed in the production of various forms of knowledge. Among the questions we will examine are: Why do we seek knowledge? How is knowledge created? How should we judge the value and validity of knowledge claims? How should society make decisions about the uses to which knowledge is put? In seeking answers to these questions, we hope to hone those critical and analytical skills that will allow us to become sophisticated producers/consumers of creative output.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is open to sophomore, juniors, and seniors with priority given to students completing the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: required course for the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Associate Professor Carol Spaulding came to Drake in 1996, after earning her PhD in English from the University of Iowa. During her graduate career, she studied American ethnic literature, concentrating on literature by Asian Americans and on the representation of mixed race in American narratives. She continues to write and publish poems, stories, and articles, many of which draw from her Korean heritage and from her interests in Asian American studies. At Drake, she teaches beginning and advanced fiction-writing workshop courses, in which she tries to bridge some of the approaches of literary theory with those of the creative writing classroom. She works with students pursuing independent projects in creative writing, which may be combined with their literary study, and with those applying to graduate creative writing programs.

Honors 109 Gender and War

Debra DeLaet
CRN 2623
3 credits
MW 12:30 p.m - 1:45 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Most mainstream international relations scholarship shares a basic assumption that war is "gender neutral." However, feminist scholarship has shown that war is a highly gendered phenomenon. Socially constructed norms of masculinity and femininity have been used by nation-states to mobilize their populations for war and to create soldiers, typically out of young men. Nation-states must go to great lengths to train their soldiers to kill, and the construction of a militarized masculinity is a key component in state efforts to achieve this objective. Nation-states also use femininity to mobilize support for war. States have relied on social and cultural depictions of supportive mothers and faithful wives of soldiers to mobilize support for war. Similarly, state depictions of innocent women as a class of people especially vulnerable to external military threats also have been used in wartime rhetoric to mobilize public support for military operations. In addition to serving as a tool for mobilizing war support and creating soldiers, gender contributes to war's divergent effects on men and women. While men are more likely to serve as combatants, women are more likely to serve in support roles (nurses, aid workers etc.) Women and children make up a higher proportion of civilian casualties and war refugees and also are more likely to be victims of rape in war whereas men are more likely to suffer as combatants. The effects of war on men vary from country to country. They may be forced to fight in political systems that do not have volunteer armies, and as combatants or potential soldiers it is harder for them to get refugee status. As soldiers, they may be treated as heroes in popular wars but reviled if wars are unpopular. For men serving in the upper echelon of the military (and high-ranking military officials are primarily men), military service can be a path to political power, a path generally denied to women. These differential effects of war on men and women can be explained largely by socially constructed gender identities that define men's and women's wartime roles in different ways. With this background in mind, this course will examine the ways in which gender norms contribute to our understanding of the causes and effects of war.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Upper-level undergraduates. The course will be of particular interest to students with a background in international relations and/ or women's studies but is open to anyone committed to learning more about the topic.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Pols 109 (CRN 2624) and WS 145 (CRN 2658); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Debra L. DeLaet received her B.A. in Political Science from Miami University (Oxford, Ohio) in 1990. She received her Ph.D. in Government and International Studies from the University of Notre Dame in 1995, with major fields in International Relations and Comparative Politics. She teaches courses on human rights, peacebuilding and justice, international law, the United Nations, gender and world politics, peace and world order, and the introductory course on world politics at Drake University. In addition to serving as an Associate Professor in the Department of Politics and International Relations, she also is affiliated with the Program in Law, Politics, and Society at Drake University. Her primary research interests are in the areas of international human rights, gender and world politics, and international migration. Outside of the classroom, her interests include running, swimming, yoga, reading, cooking and watching the Daily Show, the Colbert Report, and almost anything HBO has to offer.

Honors 113 Intersection of Physics and Eastern Thought

Mark Ferrara and Charles Nelson
CRN 2626
3 credits
TR 12:30 p.m - 1:45 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Patterns of thought in Eastern religion in some ways resemble physical phenomena as understood by quantum mechanics and the theory of relativity. In this class, we will explore the Eastern traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism and discuss the degree to which parallels to modern physics are most tenable, for example by comparing the quantum notion of "superposition" with Buddhist conception of "emptiness," and the "ERP paradox" with Asian theories of "dependent origination." Course readings are designed to familiarize students with these seminal Asian religious traditions (and to a more limited extend their literary permeations), as well as with the historical development of models of the universe from Ptolemy to Einstein (and beyond). Because the focus of the course is theoretical, a knowledge of mathematics is not required. However, it is expected that student participation will significantly shape course direction and content through discussions, presentations, and group projects.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Sophomore, Junior, Senior level.

*Preferred Prerequisite: One laboratory science course from AOI lists for either Physical or Life Sciences.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS
Mark Ferrara taught literature and writing at Kyungnam University in South Korea, Fudan University in China, and on a Fulbright fellowship at Middle East Technical University in Turkey. He became interested in the intersection of physics and Eastern through informal conversations with Charlie Nelson at band practice.

Charlie Nelson is currently an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at Drake University. He received his doctorate from the University of Virginia. A central focus of Dr. Nelson's research is super-massive black holes in the center of galaxies. His other interests include writing music, playing tennis, and spending time with his two children.

Honors 114 Crime and Punishment in the United States

Joanna Mosser
CRN 2618
3 credits
MW  2:00 p.m - 3:15 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course explores topics in the theory and practice of crime and punishment in the contemporary U.S. Topics include the moral foundations of the criminal law, the politicization of crime and punishment, the politics of the criminal process, and the edges of the criminal law, including "parallel" systems of juvenile and educational justice. Readings are drawn from political science, history, law, economics, sociology, and political philosophy. The goal of the course is to provide students with the information and skills necessary for informed, disciplined, and thoughtful analysis of commonly-held assumptions about the nature of the criminal law and criminal justice system in the U.S. Special themes include: the political construction of "normal" versus "deviant" behavior, the law "on paper" and the law "in practice," and the tension between civil rights and civil liberties and the security interests of the state.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have taken Pols 001.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Pols 157 (CRN 2620); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Joanna Mosser is assistant professor of politics. Her research and teaching interests include American politics and political institutions (federalism, in particular), American public policy, public administration, and state and local politics.

Honors 118 Eastern Philosophy

Tim Knepper
CRN 2653
3 credits
TR 9:30 a.m - 10:45 a.m

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This honors seminar will examine the philosophical ideas contained within the core texts of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism, with special emphasis on the way in which these Southeast Asian and East Asian "philosophies" challenge the commonplace Western distinction between philosophy and religion. Texts, philosophies, and philosophers to be considered include (but are not limited to) Hinduism's Upanishads, Bhagavad-Gita, and philosophical schools of Sankhya, Yoga, Nyaya, Vaisheshika, Mimamsa, and Vedanta; Theravada Buddhism's sutras, and Dhammapada; Mahayana Buddhism's sutras and philosophical schools of Madhyamaka and Yogacara; Confucianism's Analects, Mengzi, and the Neo-Confucianism of Zhu Xi and Wang Yangming; Daoism's Daodejing and Zhuangzi; and the East Asian Buddhism of Chan/Zen and Pure Land. Philosophical topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to) the nature and role of god/s, the origin and order of the cosmos, the nature and extent of knowledge, the nature and role of language and rationality, the path and goal of "salvation," the nature and role of religious experience, the nature and destiny of human beings, the good life, the nature and role of spiritual disciplines and practices, and the similarities and differences between Eastern and Western philosophy.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is open to all levels, but recommended for those who have taken at least one course in philosophy, as familiarity with basic philosophical terms will be presupposed.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-Listed with Phil 151 (CRN 2485) and Rel 111 (CRN 2676); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Timothy Knepper is an assistant professor of philosophy at Drake University. With a Ph.D. in philosophy of religion from Boston University, Tim's current "obsession" concerns the use of language to undermine language by a late-ancient Christian Neoplatonist referred to as Pseudo-Dionysius, and therefore involves research into the fields of late-ancient philosophy (Athenian Neoplatonism), philosophy of language, and mysticism. Eventually Tim would like to carry out this investigation in comparative, cross-cultural fashion—thus his interest in "eastern" philosophy (especially Madhyamaka and Zen Buddhism).

Honors 135 Rhetorics of the American Family

Joan Faber-McAlister
CRN 2679
3 credits
MW 2:00 p.m - 3:15 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Rhetorics of the American Family is a special topics course in rhetorical studies that focuses on the politics of public discourse about, and popular representations of, marriage and the family in contemporary American culture. Specific topics covered in the course will include:

  • national debates over the status of same-sex relationships and/or marriage,
  • usage of the political slogan "family values,"
  • struggles over historical representations of the American family,
  • discourse on the impact of changing gender roles in domestic space,
  • arguments about the role the family plays in communal and national identity and changing representations of sex and love in marriage in popular film, television and magazines.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is intended for students who have already completed SCSR 024 (Rhetoric as a Liberal Art). Honors students who have not completed SCSR 024 may obtain the instructor's permission to waive this pre-requisite.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCSR 134 (CRN 1242) and SCS 150 (CRN 2333); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Joan Faber McAlister earned her B.A. in Anthropology and her M.A. in Communication Studies from Boise State University and has a Ph. D. in Rhetorical Studies from the University of Iowa. Joan's research interests include domestic space, suburban culture, visual rhetorics, aesthetic theory, identity politics, and the performance of class, race, gender and sexuality in daily life. Joan has taught a variety of courses in communication and rhetoric, addressing such topics as argumentation, aesthetics, campaign politics, communication theory, rhetorical criticism, and public address.

Honors 137 Women, Madness and Culture

Janet Wirth-Cauchon
CRN 1312
3 credits
MW 11:00 a.m - 12:15 p.m

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course explores the relationship between gender and socio-cultural definitions of mental health and illness, and examines the history of the treatment of women within the major settings of the mental health system; psychiatry, psychoanalysis and asylum. The first major goal is to understand the social relations of power within which psychiatry emerged and within which women became defined as "hysterical", "irrational" or "mad". A second goal is to chart the relationship between women's social roles and the experience and treatment of mental illness, making use of autobiographical and fictional accounts by women, films and other materials.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Prerequisite: One entry level sociology or anthropology course or Introduction to Women's Studies (WS1/SOC 75/ENG 75) or instructor consent.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCSS 137 (CRN 1206) and WS 172 (CRN 1352); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Janet Wirth-Cauchon received her BA in Anthropology from Western Michigan University and her Ph.D. in Sociology from Boston College. Her current research interests are in the areas of gender studies and feminist theory, the sociology of mental illness, the body and technology, and cultural studies. Her book, Women and Borderline Personality Disorder: Symptoms and Stories is an analysis of the gender meanings used in interpreting women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. She has taught a Boston College and Bradford College. At Drake she teaches courses on feminist theory, women's studies, women and madness, psyche and society, and introduction to sociology.

Honors 140 Liberation Theology

Jennifer Harvey
CRN 2689
3 credits
TR 12:30 p.m - 1:45 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Beginning in the 1960s, liberation and feminist theologies erupted in academic and activist circles, dramatically changing the face of the discipline of theology. Taking seriously racial oppression, sexism, economic exploitation and other forms of domination and marginalization, powerful and passionate thinkers argued that theology must be done from the perspective of those on the "underside of history." Liberation and feminist theologies challenge the methods, categories and content of "traditional" theology, as well as re-read themes in the Bible. This course will explore several major theological movements within liberation theology, paying attention to their historical contexts, and major theological constructions and contributions. The focus will be on liberation and feminist theologies from within the Christian tradition.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors, or instructor consent.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Rel 155 (CRN 2395) and WS 140 (CRN 2396); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Jennifer Harvey is assistant professor of religion and ethics. She moved to Drake from Brooklyn, New York where she was involved in cross-racial dialogue and organizing against police brutality. She completed her Ph.D. in Christian social ethics and her research has been on movements for reparations for slavery and struggles for sovereignty by Native American peoples.

Honors 141 Professional Speaking and Persuasion Theory

Randall Blum
CRN 1390
3 credits
TR 12:30 p.m - 1:45 p.m.

OR

Randall Blum
CRN 2337
3 credits
MW 12:30 p.m - 1:45 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This seminar, with your full willingness to learn, experience, and explore, will focus on the psychological and social aspects of formal communication with the goal of expanding your self-awareness, increasing your self-esteem, and mastering professional speaking communications skills. It takes only seven seconds for you to make an impression on other people. Ours is an era in which both information and interpretation keep getting more tightly compressed. That seven seconds is crucial in the making and breaking of impressions, relationships, sales and decisions that affect the direction of our lives. Like it or not, a communication symbol of our age is the easily distracted, time-stressed individual who moves from personality to personality, presentation to presentation, in mere seconds, in search of some gratifying mix of entertainment, inspiration or information.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Prerequisite: Honors 001 or permission from instructor. This course is intended for student professionals who will soon enter our changing world.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

Honors 142 Speaking With Many Voices: A Sampling of Native American Cultures

Vibs Petersen
CRN 2504
3 credits
MW 12:30 p.m- 1:45 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Speaking with Many Voices aims to take a step toward making audible and visible some aspects of the rich and varied Native American cultures that have flourished on this continent for millenia. During the course of the semester, we shall read novels written by Native Americans, listen to Native American music, traditional and contemporary, get acquainted with Diné, Pueblo, Anashinaabe, Chickasaw, and Lakota histories and myths, and view films by and about Native Americans. We shall also have conversations with Native visitors to the class and speakers as well as visit the web to access Native news and issues important to current Native life. Among other things, we shall familiarize ourselves with some aspects of the quest for Native survival, its failures and successes; with the resistance to Western hegemony and with the fusion of Native and Western discourses. All the while, we shall be careful not to reduce live cultures and agents of such cultures to objects. Therefore, some of the questions we shall be examining are concerned with how we learn about an "Other," how we engage with cultures we hardly know and often dismiss or exoticize. Should we speak for others, if so, why, and what are the consequences?

The goals are many. Some of the less obvious may be: the discovery of ideas and knowledges that will enhance your own production of knowledge; a glimpse of the histories and cultures of this continent going further back than the last 500 years; an acknowledgement of the presence of peoples who have influenced the American way of life; and a greater realization of your place in the world.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is intended for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. There are no prerequisites.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCS 143 (CRN 2339) and WS 145 (CRN 2656); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Vibs Petersen is Professor of Women's Studies. She was Director of Women's Studies at Drake, 1993-2000. She holds a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from New York University.

Honors 143 Ethics of Transnational Adoption

Sandra Patton-Imani
CRN: 2576
3 credits
MW 12:30 p.m - 1:45 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will critically explore the phenomenon of transnational adoption and its increasing popularity in the U.S. We will draw on a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives to consider the ways this practice is shaped by the politics of reproduction, race, gender, class, global poverty, and international politics. We will critically consider this practice in which the children of poor women worldwide are transferred to affluent women (and men) primarily in the U.S. and Western Europe. We will explore U.S. media narratives about the "salvation" of babies transnationally and how they are used to promote and justify this social practice. We will explore the life stories of birth mothers in socio-cultural context to understand how particular laws, cultural attitudes and practices, and social policies limit and channel the range of reproductive choices available to single pregnant women in a variety of national contexts. We will consider implications of this practice for the adoptees themselves in terms of identity development, as well as the current fascination with transnational adoption in the U.S. media. Drawing on such sources we will explore the question of how to define an ethical approach to this social practice.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is intended for juniors and seniors who have had an entry-level course in Sociology or Anthropology.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCS 150 (CRN 1209) and WS 145 (CRN 2657); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Sandi Patton-Imani - Assistant Professor of American Studies at Drake University in the Department for the Study of Culture and Society. She holds a Ph.D. in American Studies and a Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies, both are from University of Maryland, College Park. She teaches Sociology, a First Year Seminar titled "Diversity in the U.S.," and courses in the Women's Studies Program.

Honors 144 War and Memory

Vibs Petersen
CRN 2501
3 credits
T  3:30 p.m - 6:20 p.m AND Film Viewing Lab: R 4:00 p.m - 6:30 p.m (CRN 2502) OR
W 4:30 p.m - 6:45 p.m (CRN 2696)

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Some say that television functions as one of culture's primary historians. Movies function along similar lines. What does it mean when movies and TV are the major constituents of a nation's cultural memory? Is it important that most of us rely on commercial visual texts when we want to find out about the past? What about our own memories about events? Can we distinguish what we 'really' remember from what others may have told us? Does it matter?

The main aim of the course is to better understand the role of the visual text as the most pervasive and persuasive medium for conveying the past to people of the present. We live in a time with many motivations for mining the past for specific uses - nationalism, reparations, law, trauma, and mourning are but some of the ends. How do we know what we know about the Vietnam War? What has shaped German `knowledge' about the Third Reich? There is no unmediated past and as conscientious citizens we must therefore grapple with the appropriation or creation of private/public memories and cultural memory.

War and Memory will focus on cultural memory and representation. The course will introduce students to various critical and theoretical concepts from (mostly) cultural theory. We shall be working with visual texts (TV, film, documentaries), literary texts - fiction as well as non-fiction.

    • Possible Films:
      • Le grand Illusion
      • The return of Martin Guerre Adorno
      • Full Metal Jacket
      • Night of the Shooting Stars
      • Tim O'Brien
      • 84 Charlie Mopic
      • Hiroshima Mon Amour
    • Possible Non/Fiction:
      • Benjamin "Excavation and Memory"
      • "The Meaning of Working through the past"
      • Brecht " Mother Courage"
      • Germany, Pale Mother
      • Trin Min Ha
      • Last Year in Marienbad
      • and others.

Gettysburgh, Oliver Stone's Vietnam Movies, and all those old WWII movies about how America won the war (think of Ken Burns TV series about baseball and jazz, or the history channel, for example).

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Junior or Senior level, or permission of instructor.

Majors /Minors / Concentrations:  Cross-listed with SCS 150 (CRN 2340); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Vibs Petersen is Professor of Women's Studies. She was Director of Women's Studies at Drake, 1993-2000. She holds a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from New York University.

Honors 149 Health and Human rights

Jennifer McCrickerd
CRN: 2610
3 credits
MW 12:30 - 1:45 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
"The highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being. Health and well-being are nearly impossible to achieve when other fundamental rights are neglected or violated, which is the fate of millions of people around the globe. For example, in southern Africa, where HIV/AIDS exists in catastrophic dimensions, women continue to be infected at disproportionately high rates and often lack legal protection against discrimination and neglect of their rights. People fleeing war-torn regions are often politically and socially marginalized and subject to violence and neglect or violation of many of their rights, including those relating to access to basic social services. Despite advances in developing countries, the disparity between the fortunate few and the huge population of the poor results in the lack of adequate food, shelter, and health care for millions. The collaboration of scholars and activists working in human rights, public health, and humanitarian relief in recent years is a powerful force to bolster human rights and health." - From the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard School of Public Health

This course will involve students investigating these issues and conversations from the multiple perspectives of philosophy, politics, epidemiology, sociology and more.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors.

Majors /Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Phil 151 (CRN 1282); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Dr. Jennifer McCrickerd is Associate Professor of Philosophy and chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religion. Prior to joining the Drake faculty in 1994, she attended Wellesley College (B.A.), and her Washington University (M.A., Ph.D.) She has done extensive work on Rawls' Theory of Justice and is currently interested in the area of Health and Social Justice. She was also named the 2003 - 2004 Honors Teacher of the Year.

Honors 150 Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament

Dale Patrick
CRN: 2497
3 credits
TR 9:30 a.m - 10:45 a.m

COURSE DESCRIPTION
A study of Israelite prophecy as preserved in the prophetic books of the Old Testament: history, rhetoric and thought.

Texts for the course:

      • Bible
      • J.M. Ward, The Says the Lord: The Message of the Prophets (W/JKP)
      • A.J. Heschel, The Prophets, 2 Vols. (Harper & Row)

Writing Assignments:

Each student will conduct a class seminar on one of the major writing prophets or a topic running through the prophets. A paper on the prophet's message or the topic, exhibiting primary research, is due at the time of presentation, and a revised form of the same paper is due at the end of the course.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is intended for students who have had at least one course in Philosophy & Religion. Please direct questions to Dr. Dale Patrick, 271-3836, Medbury Hall Office #202.

Majors/Minors/Concentrations: Cross-listed with Rel 150 (CRN ); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Dale Patrick is Professor of Bible in the Department of Philosophy and Religion. He has taught in the honors program since its inception and has authored five books, the first of which was Arguing with God: The Angry Prayers of Job, and the most recent, The Rhetoric of Revelation in the Hebrew Bible.

Honors 151 Science, Cyborgs and Monsters

Joseph Schneider
CRN: 1310
3 credits
TR 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course takes a critical look at the production of scientific knowledge and aims to provide a more complex understanding of what kind of worlds and subjects/objects the practices and processes of science create or might create. Feminism provides one of the critical discourses that sees science differently and, as such, provides a center for the course. Other critical resources in the course come from history, sociology, ethnomethodology, postmodernism, literary criticism, cultural studies, and queer theory.

Course readings and discussions will bring about new awareness and understanding in: studying science or scientific practice; class and gender influences in foundational images of scientific practice; science and a "God's Eye View" of nature as well as "man's" place in it; feminist and other attempts to deconstruct dominant understandings of science and the production of scientific knowledge; "posthuman" perspectives on the body; the implications of new figures, namely cyborgs, monsters, and queers.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
This course is intended for juniors and seniors. Students studying physical or life science would be introduced to Philosophy of Science concepts and issues.

Majors /Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCS 150 (11619) and WS 195(CRN 1357); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Joseph Schneider is Ellis and Nelle Levitt Professor of Sociology. He is interested in the sociology of knowledge and science and have published a paper or two on this question along with a recent short book on feminist science studies scholar Donna Haraway (Donna Haraway: Live Theory, Continuum, 2005). While feminist science studies is the focus of another course he has taught in the Honors Program for a few years (Science, Cyborgs, & Monsters), this new course is intended as a more over-arching look at the social study of science.

Honors 157 Introduction to the Philosophy of Hermeneutics

Allen Scult
CRN: 2496
3 credits
TR 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Examination of the theory and practice of interpretation as it fits within the framework of philosophic inquiry. Hermeneutical theory is traced through its incarnations in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy to its present central position in continental thought where, partially due to the influence of Nietzsche's assertion, "There are no facts, everything is interpretation," all that human beings understand and do is seen as a function of interpretation.

The course will deal with questions such as, how is it that human beings find certain texts, such as the Bible, for example, so profoundly meaningful that those texts come to order and frame their existence? How is meaning created out of such texts, such that particular meanings are preserved over time, surviving translation and transmission into different languages and across different cultures? We will focus on Biblical interpretation especially, because that seems to provide the most far-reaching example of how a text becomes a long lasting and profoundly influential tradition.

COURSE METHODS AND PROCEDURES

The course will consist mainly of reading and discussing classical and contemporary texts dealing with the theory and practice of interpretation. By way of furthering our understanding of how interpretation works, we will also share individual experiences of texts we have found extremely moving in some way. Our investigation of such experiences and how they work will not be confined to only literary texts, but will extend to works in other media such as film and music. Graded assignments will include papers and presentations.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for juniors and seniors with some prior experience in philosophy and a serious interest in thinking. Prerequisites: At least one philosophy course or permission of instructor.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Phil 120 (CRN 2493); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Allen Scult is National Endowment Professor of Humanities, Professor of Philosophy and Rhetoric, and recipient of the 2003-04 Centennial Scholar Award at Drake University. One of his main philosophical interests is investigating how human beings use language to interpret and understand their world.

Honors 164 Postcolonial South Asia

Sandya Hewamanne
CRN: 1344
3 credits
W 4:00 p.m - 6:50 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This junior/senior honors seminar will focus on the intense contradictions surrounding postcoloniality. The course will focus on colonial and post colonial South Asia in examining inequities in modes of representation. Using Edward Said's crucial text Orientalism as our major guide, we will look into how colonial European culture produced and managed the Orient politically, sociologically, ideologically and imaginatively during the post-enlightenment period. We will examine cultural texts that reinforced the structures of imperialism in South Asia as well as some post colonial texts that focus on lives profoundly affected by the experience of colonization. By focusing on notions of hybridity, split subjectivity, migration and exile, the class will further explore issues of representation, identity, agency, discourse and history. The course will especially focus on subaltern studies, which is specifically aimed at recovering the agency of the subaltern that got covered within elite based discourses of colonial South Asia.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for juniors and seniors.

Prerequisites: one sociology or anthropology entry level class or instructor permission.

Majors /Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCSA 150 (1240) and WS 145 (1358); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Sandya Hewamanne is Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Department of the Study of Culture and Society. Her research interests are globalization, transnational production, identity and cultural politics and feminist and postcolonial theory. She previously taught at University of Colombo, Sri Lanka, University of Texas at Austin and Hartwick College.

Honors 169 The Political Theories of American Conservatism

Dennis Goldford
CRN 2548
3 credits
MW 08:30-09:45 a.m

COURSE DESCRIPTION
One of the most remarkable features of the contemporary political and intellectual landscape in the United States is the resurgence of the conservatism that appeared moribund in the wake of the Goldwater defeat in 1964. With due regard for the perils that attend the drawing of historical parallels, we might understand that resurgence in terms of the character of the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation. In the United States the "culture wars" of the last thirty years amount to a conflict between a peculiarly American Reformation and Counter-Reformation. If the political and cultural thrust of the 1960s was a general liberalization that emphasized individual autonomy over against traditional authorities and orthodoxies (the Reformation), then the conservative political reaction that arose in the 1970s has been an attempt to reassert those traditional authorities and orthodoxies (the Counter-Reformation). Nevertheless, while those traditional authorities and orthodoxies might agree in opposing what they consider the failures or even sins of American liberalism, that agreement on a common enemy can obscure the substantive and extensive disagreements among what this course will lead students to see as the multiple streams of contemporary American conservatism. That multiplicity appears in the proliferation of terms such as traditionalist conservatism, libertarian conservatism, religious conservatism, free-market conservatism, social conservatism, paleoconservatism, and neo-conservatism. It is for this reason that I entitle the course The Political Theories of American Conservatism rather than The Political Theory of American Conservatism.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Cross-listed with POLS 189, Topics in Political Theory, this course will require substantial reading and discussion of seminal texts of contemporary American conservative political theories. Students who register for POLS 189 will write two mid-term essay examinations and one 10-page analytical paper, each counting 20% of the final course grade, and a final examination counting 40%. Students who register for the Honors designation will write the same examinations for the same percentage of the final grade, but their 20% paper will be 20-25 pages. Additionally, depending on the amount of reading I assign and, especially, on the number of students seeking Honors credit, I might have the Honors students present a summary of their papers to the class for discussion and critique.

Students who want this course to apply towards the 15 elective hours of Honors Track requirements must register for the Honors CRN 2548. The politics and International Relations Department will apply this Honors course number for their political theory course requirement.

Prerequisite: POLS 001, instructor's consent, or Honors status.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Pols 189 (CRN 2540); the Honors Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Dennis Goldford is Professor of Politics and Director of the Program in Law, Politics, and Society at Drake University. He currently teaches courses in political and constitutional theory, and his current research deals with the concept of establishment of religion in American law and politics. He previously taught Honors 162, Philosophical Foundations of Marxism, and Honors 137, Law, Interpretation, and Social Theory.

Honors 177 Gender and Violence

Nancy Berns
CRN 2663
3 credits
TR 12:30-01:45 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines gender and violence, including the social construction of the problem, interdisciplinary theoretical explanations, and the social and cultural contexts. In this course we will explore how media, politics, and popular discourse impact policy for intervention and prevention, and individual understandings of gender and violence. Some specific themes include the discovery and conceptualization of gendered violence, such as how definitions, measurements, politics, and language affect the understanding and response to the problem. Students will discuss how particular research questions and theoretical assumptions impact social policy, political agendas, and overall understanding of gender and violence. We will explore the lived experience of gender and violence from the perspectives of victims and perpetrators. Lived experience will be examined in context of the intersections of gender, race, class, age, sexual orientation, religion, and culture. Interdisciplinary explanations of gender and violence will be studied. And students will explore the social and cultural responses to gendered violence (and lack of response). Topics will include victim blaming, attitudes towards gendered violence, media images of violence, and the backlash against the battered women movement. We will also learn about programs and institutions that are involved with intervention in and/or prevention of cases of abuse and violence.

Students will be better prepared to:

      1. Recognize and explain violent and abusive strategies.
      2. Shape social policy for violence intervention and prevention.
      3. Critically read research and discourse on violence.
      4. Understand what factors contribute to violence, including interdisciplinary explanations of violence that go beyond the individual level of explanation.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for juniors and seniors who have had an entry-level course in Sociology or Anthropology.

Majors/Minors/Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCS-Sociology 177 (CRN 10346);

Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Nancy Berns is an assistant professor of sociology. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Berns teaches courses on gendered violence, social problems, media constructions, criminology, restorative justice, and youth and crime.

Honors 184 Theories of Language and Discourse

Jody Swilky
CRN 1389
3 credits
M 6:00 p.m - 8:50 p.m

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is an upper-level seminar in which you will read and write about the relationship between writing, literacy and schooling, particularly how reading and writing have been structured over the last 20 years in higher education and public schooling to help produce "literate" citizens. You will pursue this investigation in several ways. You will explore through reading and writing the competing meanings of literacy, as well as the purposes, priorities and consequences of different approaches to literacy education, as they have been represented over the last twenty years in terms of the "literacy crisis," multiculturalism, and other debates/issues. You also will examine your own literacy education, both within and outside the school, and through your research and writing critically investigate the effects of such education on your thinking and identity. And finally, you will work with a class of high school students, performing the roles of someone who reads and responds to their writings to attain greater understanding of some of the problems and possibilities of helping students develop as writers.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Juniors and Seniors who have taken Eng 60 and an English course between the level of 100-174.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations:  Cross-listed with Eng 160 (CRN 1177); Women's Studies; the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Jody Swiky is Professor of English and co-producer of a new documentary (A Little Salsa on the Prairie: The Changing Character of Perry, Iowa). He has taught honors courses since 1990. In graduate school and at Drake University, he has taught writing-intensive courses that emphasize student participation, critical thinking, and the close reading of texts. He also has taught courses in language theory and philosophical rhetoric

Honors 191 Women and Hebrew Scriptures

Sally Frank
CRN 1304
3 credits
W 4:00 p.m - 7:00 p.m

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The basics of the course include reading Biblical accounts involving women and various commentaries on those Biblical accounts with a critical eye. These accounts will include Genesis, The Red Tent and The Five Books of Miriam. The goal is to come to an understanding of how the Jewish Bible deals with issues involving women and how such an understanding can help us understand issues today.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for juniors and seniors.

Students should work with faculty advisor. Recommended for Communication-Writing Skills, Communication-Speaking Skills, Critical Thinking, Multicultural and International, Values and Ethics, and Honors Track.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with WS 181 (CRN ) and Rel 151 (CRN 1305); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Sally Frank, Professor of Law, studies Women's Rights and also brought and won a landmark sex discrimination case against Princeton University and its all-male eating clubs. Her publication "Eve Was Right to Eat the Apple: The Importance of Narrative to the Art of Lawyering," Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, is a re-examination of the Eve narrative that proposes criminal defenses that Eve might have used. Professor Frank organizes and provides representation for survivors of domestic violence, and she is an activist with peace organizations.

Honors 192 Space Matters II

Vibs Petersen
2556
3 credits
MW 2:00 p.m - 3:15 p.m AND
Film Lab: F (CRN 2562) 4:00 p.m - 6:30 p.m OR
U (CRN 2563) 2:00 p.m - 4:30 p.m

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is the result of a collaboration between five students who participated in the premiere of the 1996 FYS, entitled Space Matters: Readings in Science Fiction taught by Dr. Vibeke Petersen. Together, they developed a Senior Seminar where theoretical issues could be explored in depth and with more sophistication.

The material for the course consists of visual and literary science-fiction as well as theoretical texts. The purpose is an investigation into the representation of gendered, raced, sexed, and classed subjectivities in an electronic age. We shall pursue the formation of such subjectivities in the realm of cyber-punk, feminist utopian, or general dystopian SF discourse and our examination will be guided by current questions from eco/scientists and feminist/historians of science about human-ness, genetic engineering, ethics, and ecology. Moreover, the texts pose questions about alternatives to a Euclidean space, whether the future is uninhabitable, manifestations of spirituality, and the treatment of post-nuclear holocaust stories, among others.

On a more general level, we shall discuss why a particular text was created at a particular time, what relevance it may have (had) to various historical contexts, and how it relates to us as men and women, and to the genre as a whole. We will be employing gender, sexuality, race, and class as the primary filters through which ideas of space and the future are sifted--both by us in the classroom and by the creators of the movies and novels.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is a senior seminar. Junior or senior class standing, or instructor permission, is required.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with SCS 101 (CRN 2341) and WS 195 (CRN 2573); the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Vibs Petersen is Professor of Women's Studies. She was Director of Women's Studies at Drake, 1993-2000. She holds a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from New York University.

Honors 198 Honors Independent Study (CRN 166)
Honors 199 Honors Senior Thesis (CRN 1061)

Interested students and faculty advisors for honors independent studies or senior theses should direct their questions to Dr. Arthur sanders, Honors Program Director. The preliminary agreement to enroll form is available in the Honors Program office of the Director (Meredith Hall, room 212) and must be submitted to Dr. Sanders before enrollment is allowed in the course. Course proposal forms (and senior thesis grant forms) are available in the Honors Program office as well. Students are asked to prepare a 1-2 page proposal summary and submit it, with the appropriate form, to the faculty project mentor and to the Honors Program Director for their signatures of approval. The form is due within three weeks of the start of the semester. Students will be asked to present their findings at a student/faculty forum held prior to the student's graduation.


Intent to Change to Honors Program Track of Drake Curriculum Requirements

Name (print)

Advisor

Identification Number

Major College(s)/School(s)

AS

BN

ED

JO

PH


Please read and check:

I wish to complete the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum "Areas of Inquiry" requirements, effective immediately (/dc). Please change my computer and hard copy records accordingly.

I understand that if I decide not to complete the Honors Program Track, only those classes which the faculty adviser feels are suitable for the "Areas of Inquiry" category will count towards Drake Curriculum requirements.

I also understand that there is not a GPA requirement for completing the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum, however a 3.5 GPA cumulative, an FYS and an Honors Senior Thesis is required in order to receive recognition for completing the Honors Program with University Honors at the Drake University Commencement.

Submit signed form to the Honors Program Office, Medbury 206/209. Copies will be sent to the appropriate Dean's Office.

STUDENT SIGNATURE DATE

ADVISOR SIGNATURE DATE

  MW TR PM Classes
8:30-9:45 a.m HONR 169 (Goldford)   "M 6:00-8:50 p.m

HONR 184 (Swilky)"

9:30-10:45 a.m   HONR 118 (Knepper)

HONR 150 (Patrick)

"T 3:30-6:20 p.m

HONR 144 (Petersen)"

11:00-12:15 p.m HONR 71 (Vandegrift)

HONR 84 (Woodward)

HONR 137 (Wirth-Cauchon)

HONR 72 (Laurenzo)

HONR 78 (Sanders)

HONR 151 (Schneider)

HONR 157 (Scult)

"W 4:00-6:50 p.m

HONR 164 (Hewamanne)"

12:30-1:45 p.m HONR 149 (McCrickerd)

HONR 100 (Spaulding)

HONR 109 (DeLaet)

HONR 141 (Blum)

HONR 142 (Petersen)

HONR 143 (Patton-Imani)

HONR 113 (Nelson/Ferrara)

HONR 140 (Harvey)

HONR 141 (Blum)

HONR 177 (Berns)

"W 4:00-7:00 p.m

HONR 191 (Frank)"

2:00-3:15 p.m HONR 114 (Mosser)

HONR 135 (McAlister)

HONR 192 (Petersen)

HONR 88 (Patrick)

"R 6:00-8:50 p.m

HONR 100 (Norwood/Battle)"

University News
August 21, 2014
The Comparison Project at Drake University will kick off its 2014–2015 programming with a meditation workshop on Saturday, Sept. 6 from 9 a.m.–noon.
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