Spring 2010

CRN 5106 HONR 045 CHARACTERS IN SCIENCE: OR I'M HUMAN ENOUGH TO TELL YOU TO GO TO HELL

CRN 5110 HONR 053 LIFE & TEACHINGS OF JESUS

CNR 5114 HONR 066 BEATLES POPULAR MUSIC /SOCIETY

CRN 1388 HONR 072 MODERN SPIRITUAL MASTERS

CRN 4579 HONR 085 DEVELOPING DEMOCRACY: CRITICAL ISSUES IN CREATING DEMOCRATIC ENGAGEMENT

CRN 5108 HONR 085; DEVELOPING DEMOCRACY: CRITICAL ISSUES IN CREATING DEMOCRATIC ENGAGEMENT

CRN 5113 HONR 092 JOURNALISTS ON SCREEN/1955 TO PRESENT

CRN 3358 HONR 100 & crn 3361 lab PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE (Allen & Faux)

CRN 5103 HONR 100 & crn 5104 lab PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE (Sanders)

CRN 2469 HONR 100 & CRN 2470 lab PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE (Battle)

CRN 5105 HONR 102 SERVICE LEARNING

CRN 5112 HONR 119 BLACK CHRISTIANITY & PROPHETIC POLITICS

CRN 5177 HONR 122 LANGUAGE AND REALITY

CRN HONR 123 CLIMATE CHANGE

CRN 3421 HONR 124 SALEM WITCHCRAFT TRIALS

CRN 5178 HONR 125 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

CRN 5133 HONR 138 CONSTRUCTING NORMAL

CRN 5115 HONR 139 LEADERS, FOLLOWERS, POWER WIELDERS

CRN 5135 HONR 148 & crn 5136 film viewing lab NAZI & RESISTANCE CULTURE

CRN 1310 HONR 151 SCIENCE, CYBORGS & MONSTERS

CRN 4531 HONR 156 MODES OF CULTURAL INQUIRY

CRN 5111 HONR 157 SCIENCE, VALUES, AND DEMOCRACY

CRN 3159 HONR 161 AFRICA/ATLANTIC SLAVE

CRN 5179 HONR 167 (1 credit part-term) SOCRATES: MONSTER/BEAUTY

CRN 5175 HONR 171 NEUROSCIENCE AND THE LAW

CRN 1304 HONR 191 WOMEN & HEBREW SCRIPTURES

CRN 3492 HONR 198 HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY (requires preliminary agreement signed prior to registration)

CRN 1061 HONR 199 HONORS SR THESIS(requires preliminary agreement signed prior to registration)

 

CRN 5106 HONR 045 (3 credits)
CHARACTERS IN SCIENCE: OR I'M HUMAN ENOUGH TO TELL YOU TO GO TO HELL
MW 2:00 pm-3:15 pm
Mark F. Vitha

Course Description
News reports often begin with the statement "Today, scientists revealed that they have discovered...", but rarely do the reporters talk explicitly about or to the scientists themselves. In fact, we know precious little about or the people that do science. My goal is to have students read about the lives of scientists, understand the emotions that scientists have regarding their work, and realize that, as the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman points out, doing science is as much of a human endeavor as is writing poetry, acting in movies, or striving to be a world-class athlete. To this end, we will look at scientists as members of the human race rather than as geniuses striving to win the Nobel Prize, although some of the people we will study are Nobel laureates. Of course, to understand them we will also explore, to some extent, the areas of science in which they excelled. However, the focus of the course will remain on the 'human side' of the scientists, and on understanding how they are not that unlike you and me.

Intended Audience: First-year students considering the Honors Program track, sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Honors Program Track of Drake Curriculum

About the Instructor
Mark Vitha is involved in the Analytical Sciences Digital Laboratory (ASDL) project sponsored by NSF. He has taught Paths to Knowledge for the Honors Program numerous times, often focusing a theme around the
development of the atomic bomb. He received his B.A. from the University of St. Thomas in Capillary Electrophoresis and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, Solute Partitioning in Chromatography.

CRN 5110 HONR 053 (3 credits)
LIFE & TEACHINGS OF JESUS
MW 09:30 am-10:45 am
Bradley L. Crowell

Course Description
Jesus was the founder of the world's largest religion and one of the most controversial figures in religious history. "Life and Teaching of Jesus" is an analysis of the early Christian writings with the objective of studying the life and message of Jesus. This exploration will use the tools of historical, anthropological, sociological, and literary scholarship to investigate Jesus and the early Christian communities that produced the literature about him within their historical, cultural, and religious contexts.

Reacting to the Past - (20%) the class will collectively participate in a new "Council of Nicea" toward the end of the semester in which students will cooperate on teams that are given a particular scholarly position on the historical Jesus to support during the debates. This will require participation as a team member and a "position paper" in which you support what you think is the strongest argument in favor of your position.

Intended Audience
All students.  Cross-listed with Religion. Honors Track of the Drake Curriculum

About the Instructor

CRN 5114 HONR 066
BEATLES POPULAR MUSIC /SOCIETY
MW 12:30 pm-01:45 pm
Todd D. Evans

Course Description
Often referred to as the greatest rock and roll band of all times, The Beatles influence on popular music and contemporary culture is unquestionable. The societal context of the growth of Rock and Roll will serve as the framework for this course, which will chart the Beatles rapid rise to fame, their careers as a band and solo artists, and their continued impact on popular music and culture in the 21st century.

This course will provide an in-depth, record-by-record, look at the music of this extraordinary group and the unique songwriting partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Additionally, the course will explore the development of global cross-promotional marketing, as applied by the Beatles and their corporation, Apple. Designed for non-music majors, this course will help to develop critical listening skills, and demonstrate the progression of musical concepts and themes still being applied in popular music today.

Intended Audience
The course will be open first to sophomores. Prerequisite: Honors 001.

Major / Minors / Concentrations: The Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Todd Evans is a Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, specializing in Electronic Media production. A self-professed "garage band rock and roller" in his youth, Evans' recent research presentations, " The Music of the Beatles and Disrupted Parental Relationships", and "Paul McCartney: Healing Wounds Through Lyrics, Images and Performance" demonstrate the timeless appeal and indefinable interest in the "greatest rock and roll band of all time."

Evans has also served as Associate Dean to the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and Director of the Drake TeleMedia Center, during his 26-year tenure at Drake University.

 

CRN 1388 HONR 072 (3 credits)
MODERN SPIRITUAL MASTERS
TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm
James M. Laurenzo

Course Description
"The Other Book of God" (that is, in addition to a written scripture or Bible) is a phrase that will best express the investigation that this course intends in finding both the worth and wealth of several voices of spirituality from the last 100 years. These "voices" and "guides" (namely, Oliver, Schweitzer, Bonhoeffer, and Berry) will each point to the spirituality inherent in this creation which surrounds us and of which we all are a part. Mary Oliver's books of poems have been expressed as showing to us our "god of dirt." This same creation not only was a part of Albert Schweitzer's work on the New Testament, but this work itself drove him to serve creation in a completely different part of our world. Dietrich Bonhoeffer expressed his love of this creation by attempting to totally respond to immense evil in the midst of a good creation. Finally, Thomas Berry has been called an ecological spiritual master and an eco-theologian for our complete environment. As we read and speak together we intend to dig yet deeper into our lives and this creation. Grab your shovel and we'll dig.

Intended Audience
This course is intended for students who want to engage a wider level of discussion, spiritual and religious wise, but also history wise.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Religion; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum -- while this special topics course may be taken more than once for credit, only three credits may apply toward the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Jim Laurenzo served as pastor of the Drake Catholic Student Center (2002-May 2009) and professor adjunct for Drake's Department of Philosophy and Religion. Before this, he spent seven years as Adult Education Director for the Catholic Diocese of Des Moines where, although he abhors winter, he helped direct the ecumenical program, January Thaw (which in Des Moines is a lie). He has also taught during the summers at Grandview, Creighton and Mercy School of Nursing -- because Iowa summers are dreadful weather too. "Why not spend time inside, studying and learning and discussing the bigger questions of life?"

CRN 4579 HONR 085 (3 credits)
DEVELOPING DEMOCRACY: CRITICAL ISSUES IN CREATING DEMOCRATIC ENGAGEMENT
TR 09:30 am-10:45 am
William F. Lewis

Course Description
Developing Democracy: Critical Issues in Creating Democratic Engagement will use highly interactive methods to engage you in debates about critical historical and contemporary issues related to the development of democracy. The course uses a role-playing pedagogy called "Reacting to the Past" where you will play roles in at two games, one set in France in 1791 and one set in South Africa in 1992 that call for research, writing, and oral presentations on political, social, or philosophical debates related to the development of democratic constitutions and key cultural, political, religious, social, or diplomatic issues faced by democracies.

Intended Audience: Sophomore standing of 30 hours or more at time of registration.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Crosslisted with INTD 085; Engaged Citizen AOI; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
William Lewis is Associate Professor of Rhetoric in the Department of the Study of Culture and Society. He is a founding faculty member for the Paths to Knowledge course and he has offered numerous honors courses, including currently the Perspectives on American Character and Society Learning Community. He received his M.A., Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in Speech Communication and his B.A. from Macalester College.

CRN 5108 HONR 085 (3 credits)
DEVELOPING DEMOCRACY: CRITICAL ISSUES IN CREATING DEMOCRATIC ENGAGEMENT
MW 12:30 pm-01:45 pm
Elizabeth Robertson 

Course Description
Developing Democracy: Critical Issues in Creating Democratic Engagement will use highly interactive methods to engage you in debates about critical historical and contemporary issues related to the development of democracy. The course uses a role-playing pedagogy called "Reacting to the Past" where you will play roles in at two games, one set in France in 1791 and one set in South Africa in 1992 that call for research, writing, and oral presentations on political, social, or philosophical debates related to the development of democratic constitutions and key cultural, political, religious, social, or diplomatic issues faced by democracies.

Intended Audience:; Sophomore standing of 30 hours or more at time of registration.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Crosslisted with INTD 085; Engaged Citizen AOI; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Elizabeth Robertson is Director of the Writing Workshop and Associate Professor of English. She is a medievalist-classicist turned writing teacher. Her MA and PhD work (at Northwestern and the University of Iowa) focused mostly on medieval languages and literature, including forays into Old Norse, classical and Homeric Greek and Virgilian Latin.

CRN 5113 HONR 092 (3 credits)
JOURNALISTS SCREEN/1955 PRESENT
TR 04:00 pm-05:50 pm (time includes Film Viewing Lab)
Lee B. Jolliffe

Course Description
Why is reporting such a compelling subject in film and, later, on television? What are key elements in the public's ongoing images and expectations of journalism? From the mid-1950s forward, films about reporters offer plots that are more international, more danger-filled, and more entangled in power politics and media conglomerates. This course will examine particular films and television programs keeping in mind basic issues of production values, film theories, and the structures of American film and television. American history will also provide a backdrop for the course material, as directors attempt to recount realistic and even real-life cases, from Watergate to wars in El Salvador, Nicaragua, and the Persian Gulf. Expect to see "Black Like Me," "Heat Wave," "The Year of Living Dangerously," "Under Fire," and even "Kolchak: the Night Stalker," among others.

Intended Audience
First-year and sophomore students.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum

About the Instructor
Lee Jolliffe joined the magazine sequence at Drake University in 1995. She teaches courses in visual communications, and media-related courses for the Honors Program and has written numerous papers, book chapters and scholarly articles for American Periodicals, Journalism Quarterly, Journalism History, ETC: The Journal of General Semantics and other communication journals. Her current major project is The American Magazine: A Researcher's Bibliography, a 7,500+ entry database and book.

CRN 3358 HONR 100 & crn 3361 (4 credits)
PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE
TR 09:30 am-10:45 am and lab T 3:00-3:50 pm
Judy Allen and Steve Faux

Course Description
This is an interdisciplinary course focusing on different modes of reasoning and inquiry (i.e., "paths to knowledge") in the sciences and the humanities. It should help us to better navigate our way through an increasingly information- and knowledge-saturated society. In pursuing this aim, we will explore the modes of reasoning and inquiry that are typically employed in the production of various forms of knowledge. Among the questions we will examine are: Why do we seek knowledge? How is knowledge created? How should we judge the value and validity of knowledge claims? How should society make decisions about the uses to which knowledge is put? In seeking answers to these questions, we hope to hone those critical and analytical skills that will allow us to become sophisticated producers/consumers of creative output.

Intened Audience
Honors Program sophomores and above. Required course for Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructors

Judith Allen
Studying social psychology has been Prof. Allen's passion for many years, with her teaching interests focused primarily on social cognition and intergroup relations with an emphasis on stereotyping, prejudice and group-based conflict. After years of studying primarily complex negative human social behaviors, she developed interests in studying human consciousness, wisdom, and compassion as well as human experiences of transcendence. Drawing on theories in philosophy, psychology and cognitive neuroscience as well as spiritual traditions and philosophy of mind from both East and West, she teaches a multicultural and interdisciplinary course on human consciousness.

Steven Faux
Dr. Steven Faux received the Madelyn Levitt "Teacher of the Year" award in 2005, and the A&S "Teacher of the Year" award in 1995. Also, he was a former Director of the Honors Program. His areas of expertise include cognitive neuroscience, sensation & perception, and evolutionary psychology. To relax he plays chess and the piano (neither of which he claims expertise).

CRN 5103 HONR 100 and crn 5104 lab (4 credits)
PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE
MW 08:30 am-09:45 am and W 3:30-4:20 pm lab
Arthur B. Sanders

Course Description
Same as listed above.

About the Instructor
Arthur Sanders is Associate Provost, Professor (and chair) of Politics and International Relations, and served for ten years as Director of Honors Program (1999-2009). He has written a number of books and articles about the American political system. He just completed a book about the presidential election process and is working on a study of the role of money in elections and policy-making here in Iowa. All of his writing on American politics
has been concerned with how ordinary citizens can (or do) participate in our political world, and thus he has a
strong interest in the writings of public intellectuals and their role in fostering public, democratic debate.

 

CRN 2469 HONR 100 and crn 2470 lab  (4 credits)
PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE and lab (field trip, TBA)
T 06:00 pm-08:50 pm
Angela Battle

Course Description
Same as listed above.

About the Instructor
Associate Professor Angela Battle teaches all levels of painting in the Department of Art and Design and the Director of the Honors Program. She holds the terminal degree of Master of Fine Arts in Painting form the University of New Mexico and with a bachelor's degree in biology, her professional interests in the intersections of art, nature and science are reflected not only in her own beeswax paintings but in the teaching of such courses as Microcosm/Macrocosm (a art and natural history course) and an interim term offering of landscape art and travel.

 

CRN 5105 HONR 102 (3 credits)
SERVICE LEARNING
WF 11:00 am-12:15 pm
Sally R. Beisser

Wednesday: 11:00 am -12:15 pm (Wed classes for discussion, lecture, interaction, planning)

Friday: 11:00 am - 12:15 pm Friday classes will meet ONLY at the beginning and end of the semester. During most of the semester students will be setting their own time (in place of the Friday sessions) for project development and collaboration.

Course Description
This course will help students think critically about volunteerism, reflect on their own volunteer service, discuss social issues and problems that impact the Drake campus, the community or global populations, understand critical issues in service-learning research, and most importantly, develop a service learning project.

Students will examine the definition of service-learning, volunteerism trends, project development issues, and possible project ideas that can impact the lives of others. They will also engage in readings and discussion to investigate social issues that influence a particular area of need. This will lead to the development of a final service project to be designed and implemented individually or collaboratively. After completion of the project, they will present it to an audience, and complete final written reflections of their experiences.

Intended Audience
This course is intended for sophomore, junior or senior Honors students. Participants need access to transportation depending on project site and distance for the service-learning project visits.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Cross-listed with Educ 199; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum

About the Instructor

Dr. Sally Beisser has directed service learning and higher education activities for over a decade, has participated in a National Science Foundation grant for service-learning and technology, and has numerous published articles and presentations on service learning. She is intrigued with the way university students think of ways to make their world a better place and wants to facilitate Drake students in their own investigations. One little known fact is that she has designed a service- learning scholarship for undergraduates at her Alma Mater and gets to meet the two recipients each year for Dean's lunch to hear about their volunteer activities.

 

CRN 5112 HONR 119 (3 credits)
BLACK CHRISTIANITY & PROPHETIC POLITICS
MW 02:00 pm-03:15 pm
Jennifer A. Harvey

Course Description
African American citizens have played a distinctive role in U.S. democracy. From enslavement, through Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, Black Power movements and into the present, African Americans have vigorously critiqued the civic body and enacted robust dissent against its prevailing racial practices. This course will explore the various forms of Christianity within the African American community, and identify the unique ways in which Black Christianity in particular has contributed to democracy. Attention will be given to both what Black Christianity has said to the civic body, as well as to debates within the Black community. Manifestations of this prophetic politics in the present will also be a significant focus, with particular attention given to the roles of Black Christianity in the 2008 presidential campaign. Opportunities will be created to explore the role that Black Churches have played and continue to play in the Iowa (and Des Moines in particular) context.

Intended Audience
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors, or instructor consent.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations
Crosslisted with Religion. Engaged Citizen AOI; Cat 3 - LPS - LPS conceptions and LPS Social & Ethical Course; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Jennifer Harvey is associate professor of religion and ethics. She moved to Drake from Brooklyn, New York where she was involved in cross-racial dialogue and organizing against police brutality. She completed her Ph.D. in Christian social ethics and her research has been on movements for reparations for slavery and struggles for sovereignty by Native American peoples.

CRN 5177 HONR 122 (3 credits)
LANGUAGE AND REALITY
TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm
Timothy D. Knepper

Course Description
Linguistic relativism--the belief that languages are significantly different and shape significantly different views of reality--is often taken for granted in the humanities and social sciences as well as in popular culture. Recent linguistic evidence, however, challenges this assumption, revealing a significant amount of syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic similarity between languages. This course first will examine the recent evidence, then use it to evaluate the claims of linguistic relativism.

Intended Audience

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Crosslisted with Philosophy; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Timothy Knepper is an associate professor of philosophy at Drake University. With a Ph.D. in philosophy of religion from Boston University, Tim's current interest concerns the use of language to undermine language by a late-ancient Christian Neoplatonist referred to as Pseudo-Dionysius, and therefore involves research into the fields of late-ancient philosophy (Athenian Neoplatonism), philosophy of language (speech act theory), and mysticism (theories of ineffability). Eventually Tim would like to carry out this investigation in a comparative, cross-cultural fashion -- thus his interest in "eastern" philosophy (especially Madhayamaka and Zen Buddhism).

CRN 3421 HONR 124 (3 credits)
SALEM WITCHCRAFT TRIALS
TR 12:30 pm-01:45 pm
Elisabeth B. West

Course Description
What caused the infamous witch trials? Religious attitudes? A social crisis? Introduction of new ideas from the West Indies? Trauma from recent Indian attacks? Changes in the status of women? This course will read a variety of explanations of the Salem witch trials. However, rather than decide what "really" caused them or argue about what "really" happened, this course will focus more on the nature of evidence. When we read a description of "what happened" what constitutes the evidence? Who gets to decide what is valid and what is not? How do these ideas of evidence come into play with various strategies of writing from personal narrative to sermon to other forms? How does this increased awareness of the way evidence is "embedded" in social reality affect your views about your own reading, writing, and judging? In addition to thinking and writing about these questions, we will assess similarities and differences between the witch trials and the trail of Anne Hutchinson. We will do this through a "Reacting to the Past" curriculum which provides selected readings and role playing. This unit will be about a month of the semester and will give us another "body of evidence," so to speak. Readings will include historical and sociological explanations of the witch trails, 17 century readings (diaries, accounts of trials, etc.), and 19th - 21st century imaginative writings about eh Salem event, such as "The Crucible." There will be several short papers rather than a single large project.

Intended Audience: This course is intended for sophomores, juniors and seniors and counts as a pre-1900 English course.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: This course is crosslisted with English. Historical Consciousness AOI and Cat 3 - LPS - LPS conceptions and LPS Historical Course; Women's Studies Course; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum

About the Instructor
Lisa West is Associate Professor in the Department of English. She received her BA in English and Environmental Studies from Williams College and a PhD in American Literature from Stanford University. Her primary interests are in early American literary culture, 18th and 19th century women writers, nature writing, and writings on "place." In her courses you can expect an interdisciplinary focus, exposure to popular writings of the past, and a dedication to the close reading of texts through a variety of methodologies.

CRN 5178 HONR 125 (3 credits)
PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION
TR 02:00 pm-03:15 pm
Timothy D. Knepper

Course Description
While interest in the philosophy of religion remains quite strong outside of the formal disciplines of philosophy and religious studies, philosophers and religionists are increasingly skeptical about the long-term direction and viability of the field. This class begins in this dilemma, familiarizing itself with both a typical problems- based approach to philosophy of religion (arguments for and against the existence of God, issues of religious experience and religious language) and its recent criticisms (insufficient awareness of claims). This class then turns to three recent proposals for the future of philosophy of religion, seeking to evaluate their respective visions of the future of the field.

Intended Audience: sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Crosslisted with Religion; Crosslisted with Philosophy (capstone, with add'l requirements), Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor

CRN 5133 HONR 138
CONSTRUCTING NORMAL
MW 11:00 am-12:15 pm
Sandra L. Patton-Imani

Course Description
This course will explore social, cultural, individual, and structural definitions of "normal" and "abnormal" in the United States. We will consider the issue through a range of interdisciplinary sources including media, literature, ethnography, history, science, and public policy. The course will address such issues as disability, sexuality, gender, race, and socioeconomic status in an attempt to understand how social definitions of normality shape our views of ourselves and others, as well as how they are implicated in the maintenance of power relations. We will consider the ways understandings of normal are contested and shifting in the contemporary United States at individual community, cultural and structural levels of society. The course will be primarily discussion-based. Students will be required to conduct original research as part of research groups focusing on various aspects of normality/ abnormality. Students will write several short papers throughout the semester that draw on course readings as well as their research projects. At the end of the semester they will revise relevant short essays for inclusion in their larger research papers

Intended Audience: sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Crosslisted with SCS; Cat 3 - LPS - LPS conceptions and LPS Social & Ethical Course; Women's Studies Course; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum

About the Instructor

CRN 5115 HONR 139 (3 credits)
LEADERS, FOLLOWERS, POWER WIELDERS
M 06:00 pm-08:45 pm
Thomas S. Westbrook

Course Description
Students develop a greater understanding of their leadership potential as they learn about the role of leadership in organizations. This course explores qualities of successful leaders and how leaders build the capability of the organization to achieve business strategy. Topics include understanding management, leadership, followership, leader characteristic, practices, and the situational components of leadership style. Various personal assessments will be used to assist each student to understand his/her personal leadership characteristics and styles.

Intended Audience: students with leadership experience are preferred.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations:; Crosslisted with ALOP 139 (Education); Honors Program of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor

CRN 5135 HONR 148 & crn 5136 (3 credits)
NAZI & RESISTANCE CULTURE
MW 12:30 pm-01:45 pm and film viewing lab M 03:30 pm-06:00 pm
Vibeke R. Petersen

Course Description
"How could it have happened here?" is a questions that has frequently been posed about Germany. Germany has arguably been the dominant country in western musical development since the sixteenth century and has witnessed an extraordinary flowering of literature, philosophy and the visual arts. In fact the country has been referred to as "das Land der Dichter und Denker" (the land of poets and thinkers). "How could it have happened here" is a major historical and philosophical question, which we cannot expect to answer in the present course but it will lie behind everything we do. We will therefore investigate what happened to German culture from January, 1933, when Adolf Hitler was appointed Chancellor of the German Reich to May, 1945, when Allied forces secured Germany's unconditional surrender in WWII. Implicit in the very concept of this course is that culture matters, and we, in the U.S., are not used to think of ourselves as a particularly "cultural" nation. However, culture mattered overwhelmingly when the Nazis came to power seventy years ago. An important subtext is that art and politics could not be separated (for Hitler, himself a failed artist, politics was an art). And this course will deal with the Nazi assault on the German culture and with the response to the resistance to that assault. Films and literary texts both from and after the period are the media through which we will examine the issues. This will be a seminar with common production of knowledge through discussion of assigned material. It is the goal that we emerge from the semester with a deeper understanding of a historical period, which is a momentous marker in the Western world. We will probe the connections between culture and politics, try to come to grasps with fascist cultural philosophies and last, but not least, learn how resistance can be exercised to and under a tyrannical and deadly regime.

 

CRN 1310 HONR 151 (3 credits)
SCIENCE, CYBORGS & MONSTERS
R 03:30 pm-06:20 pm
Joseph W. Schneider

Course Description

This course offers an historical and theoretical overview of the interdisciplinary field called science studies or the social studies of science and technology as it has emerged mostly since the 1970s in the United States and the United Kingdom. The focus moves beyond looking for so-called "social factors" or "forces" thought to influence the social organization of technoscience and technoscientific work to taking the very contents and practices of that work as the objects of critical examination, including the very study thus constituted.


Intended Audience
This course is intended for sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Crosslisted with Study of Culture and Society; Critical Thinking and Women's Studies Course; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum

About the Instructor
Joseph Schneider is Professor of Sociology in the Department for the Study of Culture and Society. He long has had an interest in the sociology of knowledge and science and have published a paper or two on this question along with a recent short book on feminist science studies scholar Donna Haraway (Donna Haraway: Live Theory, Continuum, 2005). While feminist science studies is the focus of another course he has taught in the Honors Program for a few years (Science, Cyborgs, & Monsters), this course is intended as a more over-arching look at the social study of science.

 

SR 4531 HONR 156 0 DU 3.000 MODES OF CULTURAL INQUIRY MW 12:30 pm-01:45 pm 20 0 20 0 0 0 20 0 20 Darcie Vandegrift (P) 01/19-05/16 MERED 0206 Cat 3 - LPS - LPS conceptions and LPS Comparative Course

CRN 5111 HONR 157 (3 credits)
SCIENCE, VALUES, AND DEMOCRACY
TR 09:30 am-10:45 am
Martin A. Roth

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Engaged Citizen and Cat 3 - LPS - LPS conceptions and LPS Comparative Course

CRN 3159 HONR 161 (3 credits)
AFRICA/ATLANTIC SLAVE
Fridays 09:30 am-12:20 pm
Glenn H. McKnight

Course Description

Intended Audience

 

Majors / Minors / Concentrations:

 

About the Instructor

 

 

CRN 5179 HONR 167 (1 credit) Partial term: 3/22-4/22/2010
SOCRATES: MONSTER/BEAUTY
MW 11:00 am-12:15 pm
Jon Torgerson

 

Course Description

 

Intended Audience

 

Majors / Minors / Concentration

 

About the Instructor

 

 

CRN 5175 HONR 171 (3 credits)
NEUROSCIENCE AND THE LAW
MW 11:00 am-12:15 pm 
Martin A. Roth

Course Description

Intended Audience

Majors / Minors / Concentrations:  Crosslisted with Philosophy; Cat 2 - LPS - Contemporary Issues and LPS Public Policy Course; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum

 

About the Instructor

CRN 1304 HONR 191 (3 credits)
WOMEN & HEBREW SCRIPTURES
W 04:00 pm-06:50 pm
Sally B. Frank

Course Description
The basics of the course include reading Biblical accounts involving women and various commentaries on those Biblical accounts with a critical eye.  These accounts will include Genesis, The Red Tent and The Five Books of Miriam.  The goal is to come to an understanding of how the Jewish Bible deals with issues involving women and how such an understanding can help us understand issues today.

Intended Audience
This course is intended for juniors and seniors. 

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Crosslisted Religion; Women's Studies Course; the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

About the Instructor
Sally Frank, Professor of Law, studies Women's Rights and also brought and won a landmark sex discrimination case against Princeton University and its all-male eating clubs. Her publication "Eve Was Right to Eat the Apple: The Importance of Narrative to the Art of Lawyering," Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, is a re-examination of the Eve narrative that proposes criminal defenses that Eve might have used. Professor Frank organizes and provides representation for survivors of domestic violence, and she is an activist with peace organizations

 

Majors / Minors / Concentrations: Crosslisted with Religion; Women's Studies Course; Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum

Study Abroad and Honors

Study abroad is an experience that the Honors Program would like to encourage. It can challenge student's assumptions about the world and open them up to a better understanding of both cultures outside of the United States and to the culture they left behind here in the U.S. And so when students take a semester or year abroad in a program where they are transferring credit back to Drake, we would like to offer them the opportunity to apply some of those credits toward the Honors Program. Students will, therefore, be able to apply three credits from their study abroad experience if they do the following:

1) Fill out the request for study abroad credit form detailing the program you will be attending, the courses you expect to be taking, (we realize that can change), and the number of Drake credits you expect to earn while abroad. And obtain the signature of the Director of the Honors Program.

2) Keep a journal during their time abroad.

3) Upon return, write an analytical essay that reflects some aspect of their study abroad experience. The specific topic will be chosen by the student in consultation with the Director of the Honors Program. Potential topics include a look at how the experience of study abroad changed their thinking about some important topic, an examination of some aspect of the culture in which they studied, a contrast between the United States and the nation where they were, etc.

4) Make a public presentation, possibly as part of a panel made up of other Honors students who were abroad during the same semester they were, focused on their experiences abroad.

In order to do this, the student must fill out the study abroad credit form (available in the Honors office) prior to their going abroad. Students who return from study abroad and then decide they want to do this will not be allowed to do so.

The three credits that apply to the Honors Program are not additional credits beyond what was earned in the study abroad program. Rather, we will count three of those credits earned as being an "honors class."

This offer only applies to a study abroad experience where the student is earning at least 12 credits for their study abroad experience. Single classes offered by Drake (in the interim, for example) would only count for Honors credit if they had been approved as Honors classes. Traveling on your own or with friends or family, no matter how educational it might be, will not count either. Summer programs could qualify if they earn 12 or more transfer credits.

Request for Credits for Study Abroad Experience

Name:____________________________________________________________________________

Banner ID Number: _________________________________________________________________

Semester(s) of planned study abroad experience:_________________________________________

Location of the program and sponsoring academic institution:

Courses expecting to take:

Credits expecting to be earned toward a Drake degree: _________

I understand that in order to have three of these credits apply toward the Honors Program, I will:

1) Keep a journal during my time abroad.

2) Upon return, write an analytical essay on some topic relating to my experience abroad. The topic will be chosen by me in consultation with, and with the approval of, the Director of the Honors Program.

3) Upon return, make a public presentation concerning my experience abroad. This presentation may be part of a group of Honors students who have also studied abroad, or it may be done as an individual presentation.

Signature:________________________________________________________ Date: ________

Signature of Honors Director: ________________ Date: ____________
Professor Angela Battle

CRN 3492 HONR 198 (1-3 credits or approved equivalent)
HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY (preliminary agreement form must be signed prior to registration)

CRN 1061 HONR 199 (3 credits or approved equivalent)
HONORS SR THESIS/PROJECT (preliminary agreement form must be signed prior to registration)
Angela Battle

Interested students and faculty advisors for honors independent studies or senior theses should direct their questions to Professor Angela Battle, Honors Program Director.  The preliminary agreement to enroll form is available at the Honors Program web-site, /honors/forms. Students should sign the form and give it to the Honors Director, Professor Angela Battle (Harmon Fine Arts Center, room 333). The form must be submitted to Professor Battle before enrollment is allowed in the course. Course proposal forms are available in the Honors Program office as well as on-line. Students are asked to prepare a 1-2 page proposal summary and submit it, with the appropriate form, to the faculty project mentor and to the Honors Program Director for their signatures of approval. The form is due within three weeks of the start of the semester. Students will be asked to present their findings at a student/faculty forum held prior to the student's graduation.

University News
October 29, 2014
The Drake University Board of Trustees recently approved new degree programs in mathematics, science, education, technology, and health sciences while taking initial steps to further enhance the University’s programming through $65 million in new construction and renovation.
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