Spring 2011

HONORS COURSES SPRING 2011:

HONR 072. Modern Spiritual Masters. Jim Laurenzo. T/R 12:30 – 1:45

HONR 087. Music & Literature. Bill Dougherty. T/R 9:30 – 10:45

HONR 092. Journalism on Screen Since 1945. Lee Jolliffe. T/R 4:00 – 5:50

HONR 100. Paths to Knowledge. Jennifer McCrickerd. T/R 11:00 – 12:15, lab M 3:00 – 3:50

HONR 100. Paths to Knowledge. Angela Battle. T/R 9:30 – 10:45

HONR 100. Paths to Knowledge. Judith Allen. M/W 11:00 – 12:15, lab W 3:00 – 3:50

HONR 108. Philosophy of Science. Martin Roth & Colin Cairns. T/R 9:30 – 10:45

HONR 110. Constructing Americans: The Politics of Citizenship in the U.S. Joanna Mosser. W 6:00 – 8:50

HONR 111. American Philosophy. Jennifer McCrickerd. M/W 12:30 – 1:45

HONR 117. Constructing Presidential Popularity. John Todsen. T/R 8:00 –9:15

HONR 123. Global Climate Change. David Courard-Hauri. M/W 8:30 – 9:45

HONR 127. You are Here: Place, Time, Identity. Benjamin Gardner. T 4:00 – 6:50

HONR 130. Darwin's Cathedral: Evolutionary Debates on Creationism, Religion, & Morality. Steve Faux. M/W 12:30-1:45

HONR 137. Women, Madness, Culture. Janet Wirth-Cauchon. T/R 12:30 – 1:45

HONR 142. Speaking with Many Voices: Native American Cultures. Vibs Peterson. M/W 2:00 – 3:15

HONR 145. Gender and Culture in Islam. Vibs Petersen. M/W 12:30 – 1:45

HONR 146. Restorative Justice. Nancy Berns. M 5:00 – 7:50

HONR 151. Cyborgs, Science, & Monsters. Joseph Schneider. R 3:30 – 6:20

HONR 152. Post-Colonial Rhetorics. William Lewis. T/R 9:30 – 10:45

HONR 160. Gender, Technology, and Embodiment. Janet Wirth-Cauchon. T/R 9:30 – 10:45

HONR 165. Technoscience Culture & Practice. Joseph Schneider. M/W 2:00 – 3:15

HONR 170. Women & Gender in Modern America. Karen Leroux. M/W 11:00 – 12:15

HONR 171. Neuroscience and Law. Martin Roth. M/W 11:00 – 12:15

HONR 181. Philosophy of Education. Jennifer McCrickerd. T/R 2:00 – 3:15

HONR 191. Women in the Hebrew Scripture. Sally Frank. W 4:00 – 6:50

HONR 198. Honors Independent Study. Requires preliminary agreement signed prior to registration.

HONR 199.Honors Senior Thesis. Requires preliminary agreement signed prior to registration.

 

JIM LAURENZO

MODERN SPIRITUAL MASTERS

HONR 072 (3677)

TR 12:30 – 1:45

3 CREDITS


COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course will read, explore, and discuss the writings and vision of some of the great "spiritual masters" of the twentieth century. Selections of their writings will be augmented with an introduction to the author's life and writings in context and draw attention to points of special relevance to contemporary spirituality. Some of these authors found a wide audience in their lifetimes, and still do. In fact two of these "spiritual masters" are still alive and their witness and body of materials continues to grow. In the main, they are rooted, although differently, in long-established traditions of spirituality. Each also was augmented in their thinking and living with untested paths. In each case, they have engaged in a spiritual journey shaped by the influences and concerns of our age. Such concerns include the challenges of modern science, religious pluralism, secularism, and the quest for social justice. These religious thinkers interrelate their spirituality with different forms of modern thought: theology and philosophy, poetry, engagement with our modern world today, and ancient traditions often misunderstood and misused. Thomas Merton, Thich Nhat Hahn, Mary Oliver, and Abraham Joshua Heschel each will challenge one's spirituality, but quite differently—and deepen it. While the goal of each was much the same, the path for each was unique as every spiritual journey must be. These modern spiritual masters, seekers themselves, can surely serve as guides and companions to a new generation of seekers today.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for students who want to engage a wider level of discussion in the fields of spirituality, religion, and history.

SPECIAL NOTE

While this special topics course may be taken more than once for credit, only three credits may apply toward the Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Jim Laurenzo served as pastor of the Drake Catholic Student Center (2002-May 2009) and professor adjunct for Drake's Department of Philosophy and Religion. Before this, he spent seven years as Adult Education Director for the Catholic Diocese of Des Moines where, although he abhors winter, he helped direct the ecumenical program, January Thaw (which in Des Moines is a lie). He has also taught during the summers at Grandview, Creighton and Mercy School of Nursing -- because Iowa summers are dreadful weather too. "Why not spend time inside, studying and learning and discussing the bigger questions of life?"




 

WILLIAM DOUGHERY

MUSIC & LITERATURE

HONR 087 (5873) 

T/R 9:30 – 10:45

3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION


"Poets and musicians are members of one church related in the most intimate way: 
for the secret of word and tone is one and the same." -E.T.A. Hoffman

Music and Literature have traditionally been viewed as closely related art forms because both are temporal, auditory, and dynamic. This course explores the nature of this relationship through an interdisciplinary lens. By studying musical and literary art works that attempt to blur disciplinary boundaries, the course seeks to develop a comparative methodology for examining musico-literary intersections. The course is divided into three sections. The first, literature in music, considers music that takes a literary work as a referent. We shall examine to what degree music, an apparently non-denotative art form, can convey, evoke or express anything beyond itself. The second section, music in literature, is an examination of explicit attempts to "musicalize" literature or "verbalize" music. We shall read Stevens, T.S. Eliot, and Thomas Mann (with a particular focus on Doctor Faustus). The third section, Music and Literature, examines the symbiotic relationship that arises when music and text are bound together in song and opera. The opera studied will be Benjamin Britten's The Turn of the Screw after the Henry James story.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

The course is intended for sophomores, juniors and seniors. It does not require any previous musical ability. First year students may enroll in this course, but should be aware that it is aimed at students who have more experience.

SPECIAL NOTE

This class meets the Artistic Experience requirement in the Drake Curriculum. Students on the Honors Track can use this class either for the Artistic Experience or as three credits of the required 15 elective Honors credits. You cannot double count.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR


William P. Dougherty is Ellis and Nelle Levitt Professor of Music Theory and Composition. His primary research interest is in developing a semiotic approach to the art song that rigorously applies the semiotic theory of Charles Sanders Peirce. In particular, he is examining the over 300 settings of the 10 lyric poems from Goethe's Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre. He is also an active composer, and has composed over 50 works for various ensembles.

 

LEE JOLLIFFE

JOURNALISM ON SCREEN SINCE 1945

HONR 092 (5260) 

TR 4:00 – 5:50 (INCLUDES FILM VIEWING LAB)

3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

Why is reporting such a compelling subject in film and, later, on television? What are key elements in the public's ongoing images and expectations of journalism? From the mid-1950s forward, films about reporters offer plots that are more international, more danger-filled, and more entangled in power politics and media conglomerates. This course will examine particular films and television programs keeping in mind basic issues of production values, film theories, and the structures of American film and television. American history will also provide a backdrop for the course material, as directors attempt to recount realistic and even real-life cases, from Watergate to wars in El Salvador, Nicaragua, and the Persian Gulf. Expect to see "Black Like Me," "Heat Wave," "The Year of Living Dangerously," "Under Fire," and even "Kolchak: the Night Stalker," among others.



INTENDED AUDIENCE

First-year and sophomore students




ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Lee Jolliffe joined the magazine sequence at Drake University in 1995. She teaches courses in visual communications, and media-related courses for the Honors Program and has written numerous papers, book chapters and scholarly articles for American Periodicals, Journalism Quarterly, Journalism History, ETC: The Journal of General Semantics and other communication journals. Her current major project is The American Magazine: A Researcher's Bibliography, a 7,500+ entry database and book.




 

JENNIFER MCCRICKERD

PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

HONR 100 (5252) (5253 lab)

LECTURE T/R 11:00 – 12:15, LAB M 3:00 – 3:50
4 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

You have spent much of your life in school with the intended goal of acquiring, among other things, knowledge. In this class we will be looking at the question of what knowledge is, why/if/when it's important and how it is most productively acquired. More specifically, our discussion of knowledge will shift to a discussion of truth and understanding, how (or whether) these are related to knowledge, which of these is most desirable and, again, how they are acquired. In the course of these discussions, we will touch on many topics and disciplines including, but not limited to, philosophy, neuroscience, art, sociology and history.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Honors Program sophomores and above. Required course for Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

Professor Jennifer McCrickerd was the 2004 Honors Teacher of the Year and the 1999 A&S Teacher of the Year. She did her undergraduate work at Wellesley College and received her MA and PhD in Philosophy from Washington University in St Louis. Her areas of teaching and research interest are Environmental Justice, Health & Social Justice, Philosophy of Education and all areas in Ethics, particularly the impact of metaphors on how we understand ethical (and other) issues.

 

JUDITH ALLEN

PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

HONR 100 (4173) (4174 lab)

LECTURE M/W 11:00 – 12:15, LAB W 3:00 – 3:50

4 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course takes an interdisciplinary and multicultural approach to the study of mind, consciousness and the mind-body relationship. To this end students will read about and learn from scholarly and experiential sources regarding questions about the nature of mind and consciousness from West and East. Readings representing Western philosophical and scientific perspectives will draw from philosophy, cognitive neuroscience, cognitive and social cognitive psychology, psychopathology, human development, biology and quantum physics. Selected readings from Western spiritual traditions include writings from Judaism, Christianity and Cherokee Indian traditions. Readings from Eastern cultural, philosophical and spiritual traditions will include Hindu, Buddhist and Taoist sources.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Honors Program sophomores and above. Required course for Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Studying social psychology has been Prof. Allen's passion for many years, with her teaching interests focused primarily on social cognition and intergroup relations with an emphasis on stereotyping, prejudice and group-based conflict. After years of studying primarily complex negative human social behaviors, she developed interests in studying human consciousness, wisdom, and compassion as well as human experiences of transcendence. Drawing on theories in philosophy, psychology and cognitive neuroscience as well as spiritual traditions and philosophy of mind from both East and West, she teaches a multicultural and interdisciplinary course on human consciousness.

 

ANGELA BATTLE

PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

HONR 100 (3932) (3933 lab)

LECTURE T/R  9:30 – 10:45, LAB M 4:00 - 4:50
4 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTON

Panoptikon – Enquiries into Life and Landscape. 
Knowledge of life and landscape comes in many forms and is highly specific to the time in which we live as influenced by the forces of contemporary theory, popular culture, the media and politics, philosophy, historical consciousness, personal truths and experiences. This course will present a forum for the opening up of important concepts, claims and perspectives found in the study and consideration of life and landscape. There are individuals who communicate ideas and positions through research, poetical language, fiction and individuals who speak visually, through painting or cinema. Some take long walks across landscapes and link what is directly experienced with buried historical perspectives and so rearrange what is commonly understood about a place and all of its inhabitants. How do we, as human beings, place ourselves either within or without the world around us? We will delve into multi-faceted aspects of the organic and inorganic, seeking unusual perspectives into the strange connections and potential rearrangements that may be made between life and landscape.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Honors Program sophomores and above. Required course for Honors Program Track of the Drake Curriculum.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Associate Professor Angela Battle teaches all levels of painting in the Department of Art and Design and the Director of the Honors Program. She holds the terminal degree of Master of Fine Arts in Painting form the University of New Mexico and with a bachelor's degree in biology, her professional interests in the intersections of art, nature and science are reflected not only in her own beeswax paintings but in the teaching of such courses as Microcosm/Macrocosm (a art and natural history course) and an interim term offering of landscape art and travel.

 

MARTIN ROTH & COLIN CAIRNS
PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
HONR 108 (6015) / PHIL 129 (5715)
T/R 9:30 – 10:45
3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course will examine the major topics and issues of contemporary philosophy of science, including (but not limited to) the demarcation criteria of science, the rationality and objectivity of scientific theories, the verification and falsification of scientific theories, and the claims and merits of realism, pragmatism, empiricism, and constructivism. The course will also consider the ways in which various contexts of scientific activity (technological, social, historical, economic, political) affects the practice and aims of science.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Sophomore or above.

INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION
Martin Roth has taught several courses on general philosophy of science, as well as courses on philosophy of psychology and philosophy of evolutionary theory. His primary research interests are in the philosophy of cognitive science, theory of knowledge, and the intersection of philosophy and neuroscience. Colin Cairns' academic training is in inorganic chemistry and so he teaches several courses in the chemistry department.  He has also taught in the FYS and Honors Programs (the introductory Paths to Knowledge course). His primary "extra-disciplinary" interests are in Science and Technology Studies (STS).

 

JOANNA MOSSER

CONSTRUCTING AMERICANS: THE POLITICS OF CITIZENSHIP IN THE U.S.

HONR 110 (5881), POLS 158 (5786)

W 6:00 – 8:50 

3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the politics of membership in the U.S. We begin, in Part I, by exploring theories of citizenship and political identity. How are political communities constructed and maintained? How do political theorists understand the origins and requirements of membership in particular political communities? In Part II, we apply our discussion of theories of citizenship to the American political community itself, exploring how American political culture and judicial decisions have structured access to U.S. citizenship, with particular emphasis on the historical role that racial, class, and gender distinctions have shaped access to full "member" status. In Part III, we explore how American public policy shapes understandings of the rights and duties of membership. We focus, in particular, on welfare, crime, and education policy and efforts to privatize "public" functions. How do policy interventions of this sort shape our understanding of the rights and obligations of citizenship? How do public policy decisions shape our understandings of what "membership" and "American-ness" require? Finally, in Part IV, we discuss the future of membership-politicking in the U.S., exploring contemporary theoretical and policy debates about multiculturalism and diversity, immigration control, and the fate of democratic citizenship in an "Age of Terror." Our discussion, throughout, is informed by readings from law, political theory, public policy, and sociology.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Sophomore, Junior, and Senior level.



ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Joanna Mosser is an Assistant Professor of Politics. Her research and teaching interests include American politics and political institutions (federalism, in particular), American public policy, public administration, and state and local politics.

 

JENNIFER MCCRICKERD
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY
HONR 111 (6014) / PHIL 109 (5713)
M/W 12:30 – 1:45
3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION
A study of the central texts and ideas of American philosophy from transcendentalism in the nineteenth century to pragmatism in the twentieth, readings will include but not be limited to Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, William James, John Dewey, W.E.B. DuBois, Nelson Goodman and Catherine Elgin.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Sophomore level and above. This course requires lots of reading and thinking.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Professor Jennifer McCrickerd was the 2004 Honors Teacher of the Year and the 1999 A&S Teacher of the Year. She did her undergraduate work at Welleslely College and received her MA and PhD in Philosophy from Washington University in St Louis. Her areas of teaching and research interest are Environmental Justice, Health & Social Justice, Philosophy of Education and all areas in Ethics, particularly the impact of metaphors on how we understand ethical (and other) issues.

 

JOHN TODSEN
CONSTRUCTING PRESIDENTIAL POPULARITY
HONR 117 (6016) / POLS 119 (5796)
T/R 8:00 – 9:15 a.m.
3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION
As the title suggests, this class will focus on the American Presidency and how the success and failure of that office is tied to popularity. During the course, students will study factors that affect the President's approval rating and his political capital. Course content will cover both external events and things the President does and doesn't do, as well as possible reactions and the effects of those choices. This course will address how the universe of possible actions has changed over time, and discuss the changes over the history of the constitution that have altered the way that the public and the president interact.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Juniors and Seniors. While all students are welcome enroll for the class, I plan on running this in a highly interactive seminar format, so the extra preparation is strongly advised. Freshman and Sophomore students may enroll with instructor permission.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Dr. Todsen teaches courses on a broad range of American Politics topics in the Department of Politics and International Relations. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of New Mexico, as well as a M.A. in Government and a B.A. majoring in Government, English Literature and German Language, both from New Mexico State University. He has taught multiple courses at both institutions. Dr. Todsen's professional curiosity knows no bounds, but in the terms of research, usually focuses on the development of American political system and especially that of the Presidency.

 

DAVID COURARD-HAURI

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

HONR 123 (5340), ENSP 135 (5797)

M/W 8:30 – 9:45 a.m. 

3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will be an interdisciplinary investigation of anthropogenic global change, using global warming as a semester-long case study. In this course students will learn to investigate a major environmental issue by first obtaining a strong scientific background in the issue, then applying methods of policy analysis, and finally advocating for effective governmental decision making. Students will also gain a strong appreciation for the complexity and gravity of the climate change issue.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for sophomores, juniors and seniors.  Prerequisite: Math 20 or above, or instructor permission.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

David Courard-Hauri is an Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Policy. His research is in climate issues, and he has a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry and a Masters in Public Affairs.

 

BENJAMIN GARDNER

YOU ARE HERE: PLACE, TIME, AND IDENTITY

HONR 127 (5986)

T 4:00 – 6:50 

3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

You are Here: Place, Time, and Identity is an Honors course focusing on the study of place and time—specifically, how these concepts relate to personhood and identity. Using such disciplines as phenomenology, human geography, contemporary art, film, visual culture, philosophy, and religious studies, the course intends to approach and decipher the multifaceted nature of these ubiquitous terms. The course structure is broken up into three main topics: taxonomy of place, death and its relation to place and time, and personal identity theories. Each topic will cumulate in a visual, audible, or ephemeral presentation by each student in an attempt to integrate the information into a greater understanding of place and time.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors; First-year students may enroll with permission of instructor.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Benjamin Gardner is an Assistant Professor of Art and Design. He holds both a BFA and MFA in Painting and Drawing. Studio art requires a consistent flow of ideas and research, and Professor Gardner's work has revolved around spatial theory since graduate school. His master's thesis, to the one not in the room, primarily explored the phenomenological ideas regarding space as they pertain to houses and lived-in interiors. His current research and studio work concerns archetypal symbolism, superstitions, and other cultural traditions regarding space and place.

 

STEVEN FAUX
DARWIN’S CATHEDRAL: EVOLUTIONARY DEBATES ON CREATIONISM, RELIGION, AND MORALITY
HONR 130 (6013)
M/W 12:30 – 1:45
3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Darwinism has been heralded as everything from the greatest theory in the history of science to the Devil's tool to destroy the moral foundations of society. This course will critically examine evolutionary science perspectives on religion, morality, the existence of God, and creationism (intelligent design). Topics will include study of the impact of evolutionary ideas on religion and theology. Darwinian views of "moral" behavior, specifically, altruism and cooperation, will be explored. Could it be that religious behavior is an evolutionary adaptation for survival?

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Juniors and Seniors (this class will be taught at the upper-division level). Students enrolling in this course should have had a course in introductory psychology (PSYCH 1) or introductory biology (BIO 12 or 13). Sophomores may register with instructor's approval.

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION
Dr. Faux has been a faculty member of the Department of Psychology at Drake University for twenty years. He has received teaching awards at the college and university level. He did his undergraduate work at the University of California, Riverside; his doctoral work was conducted at Brigham Young University, and he was appointed as a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School for five years. He has extensive interests on the interdisciplinary connections between evolutionary biology and religion, and he has published several papers in the area. In the context of this "Darwin's Cathedral" course, perhaps a personal note is relevant. Dr. Faux respects both atheists and theists.

 

JANET WIRTH-CAUCHON

WOMEN, MADNESS, & CULTURE

HONR 137 (3664), SCSS 137 (3635)

T/R 12:30 – 1:45

3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION


This course explores the relationship between gender and socio-cultural definitions of mental health and illness, and examines the history of the treatment of women within the major settings of the mental health system; psychiatry, psychoanalysis and asylum. The first major goal is to understand the social relations of power within which psychiatry emerged and within which women became defined as "hysterical", "irrational" or "mad". A second goal is to chart the relationship between women's social roles and the experience and treatment of mental illness, making use of autobiographical and fictional accounts by women, films and other materials.


INTENDED AUDIENCE


Prerequisite: One entry level sociology or anthropology course or Introduction to Women's Studies (WS 75/SOC 75/ENG 75) or instructor approval.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR


Janet Wirth-Cauchon is an associate professor of sociology in the Department for the Study of Culture and Society. She teaches courses in feminist theory; psychiatry and society; and women, madness and culture. Her research and writing interests are in feminist theory, gender and psychiatry, science studies, and the body and technology. Her book, Women and Borderline Personality Disorder: Symptoms and Stories, (Rutgers, 2001) examined how women were vulnerable to the psychiatric diagnosis of "borderline personality." Professor Wirth-Cauchon was a Research Associate at the Five Colleges Women's Studies Research Center in South Hadley, MA during the academic year 2009-2010.


 

VIBEKE PETERSEN

SPEAKING WITH MANY VOICES: A SAMPLING OF NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURES

HONR 142 (5959) (6005 LAB), SCS 143 (4804) (5939 LAB)

M/W 2:00 – 3:15

3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

Speaking with Many Voices aims to take a step toward making audible and visible some aspects of the rich and varied Native American cultures that have flourished on this continent for millenia. During the course of the semester, we shall read novels written by Native Americans, listen to Native American music, traditional and contemporary, get acquainted with Diné, Pueblo, Anashinaabe, Chickasaw, and Lakota histories and myths, and view films by and about Native Americans. We shall also have conversations with Native visitors to the class and speakers as well as visit the web to access Native news and issues important to current Native life. Among other things, we shall familiarize ourselves with some aspects of the quest for Native survival, its failures and successes; with the resistance to Western hegemony and with the fusion of Native and Western discourses. All the while, we shall be careful not to reduce live cultures and agents of such cultures to objects. Therefore, some of the questions we shall be examining are concerned with how we learn about an "Other," how we engage with cultures we hardly know and often dismiss or exoticize. Should we speak for others, if so, why, and what are the consequences? The goals are many. Some of the less obvious may be: the discovery of ideas and knowledges that will enhance your own production of knowledge; a glimpse of the histories and cultures of this continent going further back than the last 500 years; an acknowledgement of the presence of peoples who have influenced the American way of life; and a greater realization of your place in the world

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors



SPECIAL NOTE

This course may be used as part of the Women's Studies Concentration.



ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Vibeke Rützou Petersen was born in Denmark, and received her Ph.D. in German Studies from New York University. She came to Drake University in 1993 as the Director of Women's Studies. She is the author and editor of three books, and teaches courses in German studies, film studies and women's studies. She serves as department Chair for the Study of Culture and Society.

 


VIBEKE PETERSEN

GENDER AND CULTURE IN ISLAM

HONR 145 (5958) (6006 LAB), SCS 146 (5927) (5938 LAB)

M/W 12:30 – 1:45

3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines issues and ways of life pertaining to sexuality, education, religion, and women and the state, in various rural and urban geographical locations in the Muslim world. Gender will be used as the mail filter through which we shall observe the issue and we shall use case studies in order to "sample" different locations. The goals of the course include understanding the multiplicity of Muslim Women's experience, gaining knowledge of the articulation of Islam and its complexities, and the challenging media stereotypes.


INTENDED AUDIENCE

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors



ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Vibeke Rützou Petersen was born in Denmark, and received her Ph.D. in German Studies from New York University. She came to Drake University in 1993 as the Director of Women's Studies. She is the author and editor of three books, and teaches courses in German studies, film studies and women’s studies. She serves as department Chair for the Study of Culture and Society.




 

NANCY BERNS

RESTORATIVE JUSTICE 

HONR 146 (5869), SCSS 146 (5928)

M 5:00 – 7:50 

3 CREDITS



COURSE DESCRIPTION

Restorative justice is a perspective that views crime as a harm against people and the community, which needs to be addressed through the involvement of offenders, victims, and the community. This course provides an introduction to the principles and practices behind restorative justice. A restorative justice movement has been growing dramatically globally in the past couple of decades. Along with this growth come many challenges, pitfalls, and critics. The course is designed to allow students to struggle along with the experts in trying to navigate the opportunities and challenges, the success stories and the pitfalls that accompany restorative justice programs. In the process, students will explore questions about justice, crime, imprisonment, punishment, rehabilitation, forgiveness, and the purpose of a legal system. The course relies heavily on international perspectives to learn about these issues.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Junior and Senior level

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Nancy Berns is an associate professor of sociology. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Berns teaches courses on gendered violence, social problems, media constructions, criminology, restorative justice, and youth and crime.

 

JOSEPH SCHNEIDER

CYBORGS, SCIENCE & MONSTERS

HONR 151 (3663), SCS 151 (4108), SCS 199 (5933)

R 3:30 – 6:20 

3 CREDITS



COURSE DESCRIPTION


This course introduces students to various critical analyses of technology, science, and knowledge as mobile sets of situated practices that always bear the marks of those particular social, historical, cultural, and political-economic locations in which they emerge and are practiced. Drawing especially from recent work in feminist science studies, from actor-network theory, and the intersection of studies of new media technology and affect, students are asked to consider these critiques of science and knowledge work as opening up new ways to think, do inquiry, and evaluate knowledge claims that take the materiality and matter of the world seriously-respecting much about the very traditions these texts criticize-while following the promises of this work toward building ways of knowing in which ethics and politics are as important as epistemology. Among the topics considered are representationalism and its critique, the relationship of matter and meaning in knowledge work, the laboratory as a political stage, distributed and networked agency, posthumanism, the "intra-action" of human as well as non-human entities in the production of knowledge, the nature of reality, objectivity, and truth; new media technology; measurement, ontology, and embodiment.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Students studying physical or life science would be introduced to Philosophy of Science concepts and issues.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR


Joseph Schneider is Ellis and Nelle Levitt Professor of Sociology. He is interested in the sociology of knowledge and science and has published a paper or two on this question along with a recent short book on feminist science studies scholar Donna Haraway (Donna Haraway: Live Theory, Continuum, 2005). While feminist science studies is the focus of another Honors Program course, Technoscience Culture/Practice, this course is intended as a more over-arching look at the social study of science.

 

WILLIAM LEWIS
POST-COLONIAL RHETORICS
HONR 152 (6018)
T/R 9:30 – 10:45
3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Most people in the world live in the aftermath of colonialism or in the shadow of empire—or both. This course proposes to explore the rhetorical significance of the postcolonial condition, examining distinctive forms of colonial discourse, rhetorics of resistance, and the theorizing of contemporary discourses distinctively shaped by the still-existing relationships between colonizer and colonized.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
JR, SR (upper-level course; presumed general background and interest). Sophomores and first-year students may enroll with permission of the instructor.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
William Lewis is Professor of Rhetoric in the Department of the Study of Culture and Society, and teaches in the Law, Politics, and Society Program. He is a founding faculty member for the Paths to Knowledge course and he has offered numerous honors courses, including the Perspectives on American Character and Society Learning Community. He received his M.A., Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in Speech Communication and his B.A. from Macalester College.

 

JANET WIRTH-CAUCHON
GENDER, TECHNOLOGY, & EMBODIMENT
HONR 160 (6017) / SCSS 150 (4810)
T/R 9:30 – 10:45
3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION
In this course we will study the social and ethical implications of new technologies that are transforming the boundaries of human embodiment, and challenging the meanings and experience of gender and race-ethnicity. Through examination of feminist and social analyses of topics such as genetic testing, new reproductive technologies, the biologies of sex-gender, ecology and human-animal relations, and affect and biopolitical control, students will learn concepts and new theoretical frameworks through which to analyze the changing relations between gender, technology and embodiment.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
SO, JR, SR

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Janet Wirth-Cauchon is an associate professor of sociology in the Department for the Study of Culture and Society. She teaches courses in feminist theory; psychiatry and society; and women, madness and culture. Her research and writing interests are in feminist theory, gender and psychiatry, science studies, and the body and technology. Her book, Women and Borderline Personality Disorder: Symptoms and Stories, (Rutgers, 2001) examined how women were vulnerable to the psychiatric diagnosis of "borderline personality." Professor Wirth-Cauchon was a Research Associate at the Five Colleges Women's Studies Research Center in South Hadley, MA during the academic year 2009-2010.

 

JOSEPH SCHNEIDER

TECHNOSCIENCE CULTURE & PRACTICE

HONR 165 (5882), SCSS 135 (4140)

MW 2:00 – 3:15

3 CREDITS



COURSE DESCRIPTION


This course offers an historical and theoretical overview of the interdisciplinary field called science studies or the social studies of science and technology as it has emerged mostly since the 1970s in the United States and the United Kingdom.  The focus moves beyond looking for so-called "social factors" or "forces" thought to influence the social organization of technoscience and technoscientific work to taking the very contents and practices of that work as the objects of critical examination, including the very study thus constituted. The point of course is not to "oppose" science—but rather to treat it critically as the social-cultural complex that it is.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for sophomores, juniors and seniors.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR


Joseph Schneider is Ellis and Nelle Levitt Professor of Sociology. He is interested in the sociology of knowledge and science and has published a paper or two on this question along with a recent short book on feminist science studies scholar Donna Haraway (Donna Haraway: Live Theory, Continuum, 2005).

 

KAREN LEROUX

WOMEN & GENDER IN MODERN AMERICA 

HONR 170 (5880), HIST 170 (5247)

MW 11:00 – 12:15

3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Seventy years ago a pioneering historian asked what U.S. history would look like seen "through women's eyes." In recent years historians have tackled that project, producing a dynamic new history of women and transforming our understanding of the past in the process. This course pursues three related questions: How does our vision of U.S. history change when we place women at the center of analysis? How has gender shaped, and been shaped by, developments in U.S. history? And how can we explain the differences among women's experiences? In this seminar, we will examine historical experiences common to American women while paying close attention to differences and divisions among them. We will also explore how individuals and groups have contested and perpetuated the ways Americans think about and experience gender in family life, education, sexuality, work, marriage, and politics. The course is designed for upper-division students to deepen their knowledge of U.S. history, to learn about important themes in women's and gender history, and to provide a structured opportunity to conduct historical research and analysis in this field. Assignments will help you practice finding and analyzing primary sources and using evidence to develop historical interpretations.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Karen Leroux is Assistant Professor of History. Her teaching area is United States history with specialization in women and gender. Interests: Histories of gender, labor, and education.
Current Research: U.S. Women's Work in Public Education 1865-1902.

 

MARTIN ROTH

NEUROSCIENCE & LAW

HONR 171 (5316), PHIL 151 (5145)

M/W 11:00 – 12:15

3 CREDITS



COURSE DESCRIPTION

Our laws reflect certain assumptions about the nature of—and relationship between—intent, choice, reason, emotion, action, responsibility, and punishment. In this course, we will examine these assumptions in light of our growing understanding of how the brain works. Among the questions we will consider include: What are these assumptions in the first place, i.e. what picture of human beings do they suggest? Do results from cognitive neuroscience support or undermine these assumptions? What are some of the conceptual challenges that arise when attempting to use cognitive neuroscience to study and understand mind, choice, and responsibility? In what ways (if any) might we revise our legal system, in light of the science? Most of the works we will read are by legal scholars, philosophers, and/or neuroscientists.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This course is intended for Juniors and Seniors. Sophomore students may register with instructor approval.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Martin Roth is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy.  His main area of research is in the philosophy of cognitive science, and he is especially interested in how we should think about knowledge and consciousness, in light of cognitive neuroscience.

 

JENNIFER MCCRICKERD
PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION
HONR 181 (6019) / PHIL 197 (5330)
T/R 2:00 – 3:15
3 CREDITS

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is focused on understanding (a) what learning is, (b) what obligation (if any) society has to educate its citizens, (c) how learning is possible, (d) what the purpose of education is and (e) how learning can best happen. Studying these questions will take us through a variety of areas including epistemology, philosophy of mind, ethics, social and political philosophy, psychology, and politics, to name a few. Students are expected not only to study and become familiar with different positions but to take them seriously, be able to identify differences, articulate reasons one might reject or accept positions and be able to reach reasoned (though tentative) conclusions about which positions make the most sense.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
Juniors and Seniors. Sophomore students may register with instructor approval.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Professor Jennifer McCrickerd was the 2004 Honors Teacher of the Year and the 1999 A&S Teacher of the Year. She did her undergraduate work at Welleslely College and received her MA and PhD in Philosophy from Washington University in St Louis. Her areas of teaching and research interest are Environmental Justice, Health & Social Justice, Philosophy of Education and all areas in Ethics, particularly the impact of metaphors on how we understand ethical (and other) issues.

 

SALLY FRANK

WOMEN IN THE HEBREW SCRIPTURES

HONR 191 (3662), REL 151 (5901)

W 4:00 – 6:50

3 CREDITS



COURSE DESCRIPTION


The basics of the course include reading Biblical accounts involving women and various commentaries on those Biblical accounts with a critical eye. These accounts will include Genesis, The Red Tent and The Five Books of Miriam. The goal is to come to an understanding of how the Jewish Bible deals with issues involving women and how such an understanding can help us understand issues today.

INTENDED AUDIENCE


This course is intended for juniors and seniors.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR


Sally Frank, Professor of Law, studies Women's Rights and also brought and won a landmark sex discrimination case against Princeton University and its all-male eating clubs. Her publication "Eve Was Right to Eat the Apple: The Importance of Narrative to the Art of Lawyering," Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, is a re-examination of the Eve narrative that proposes criminal defenses that Eve might have used. Professor Frank organizes and provides representation for survivors of domestic violence, and she is an activist with peace organizations.

 

HONR 198
HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY
1-3 credits or approved equivalent

Preliminary agreement form must be signed prior to registration. Access the Honors Independent Study form.

 

HONR 199
HONORS SENIOR THESIS
3 credits or approved equivalent

A preliminary agreement form must be signed by a faculty advisor and the Honors director prior to registration. Those interested in Honors Senior Thesis should contact the Honors office at (515) 271-2999 or honors.program@drake.edu. The Assistant Director of Honors or Honors Director can sign the preliminary agreement for your Honors Senior Thesis. Access the instructions and forms for Honors Senior Thesis Contract.

Once enrolled in Honors Senior Thesis, students should prepare a 1-2 page proposal summary and submit it, with the appropriate form, to the faculty project mentor and the Honors Program Director for their signature and approval. The Honors Senior Thesis contract must be submitted to the Honors office by the third Friday of the semester. Students will be asked to present their findings at a student/faculty forum held prior to the student's graduation.

University News
October 31, 2014
A retired U.S. diplomat and United Nations peacekeeper will discuss the UN’s role in peacekeeping on Nov. 6.
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