List of IB Courses and Course Description

BUS 070 – GLOBALIZATION
This course is designed as an introduction to the processes, institutions and prob-lems associated with doing business in international environments. The perspec-tive adopted here is that of an international business manager looking beyond the boundaries of the firm. The course material will be naturally divided into two sec-tions. The first focus will be on the political, social, cultural and economic conse-quences of globalization and the differences between national markets. The second focus will be on cross-border trade and the global monetary system. Sophomore standing. Prereq.: ECON 001, ECON 002, and (ACCT 042 or BLAW 060)

ECON 130 – INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
The study of international trade theories and policies, factor movements, and monetary relations, including foreign exchange markets, adjustment mechanisms and policies, and the international monetary system. Prereq.: ECON 001 and 002 and MATH 020 or higher.

ECON 170 – DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS
Patterns and prospects for development in the less developed countries of the world. Characteristics of low income countries, the economics of the development process built around alternative theories of economics development. Prereq.: ECON 001, ECON 002, and MATH 020 or higher.

MGMT 170 - INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
This course examines a broad understanding of how culture impacts management in the international business environment. The major objective of the course is to engen-der a gobal mindset and a better understanding of the problems and challenges that organizations and managers face in the international context. Prereq.: Senior standing, MGMT 110, BUS 070, FIN 101, MKTG 101

MKTG 170 - GLOBAL MARKETING
This course addresses the globalization of marketing management and strategy. Specif-ic emphasis is placed on elements of the global environment, assessments of global op-portunities and the development of global product, pricing, promotion, and distribution strategies. Prereq.: MKTG 101.

POLS 065 - COMPARATIVE POLITICS
This introductory course encourages students to look at politics in other countries from a comparative perspective. Basic topics in the field include the origins of states, political culture, types of political regimes, political institutions, causes of revolution, the roots of democracy and political development. The study of a few select countries and regions helps to illustrate these concepts. Prereq.: none.

SCSG 003 – WORLD GEOGRAPHY
A systematic study of the major regions and nations of the world. Emphasis is on the spatial structure of their physical and cultural elements, regional problems and the interdependence of different areas of the world.

HIST 060 – AFRICA IN WORLD HISTORY
HIST 060 is a survey of important issues in sub-Saharan Africa's history from approximately 1500 C.E. to the present. It is designed to accomplish two goals. One, to analyze the major forc-es that have caused social, political, and economic change from c.1500 to the present both within sub-Saharan Africa and between this region and the world. Two, to understand how these historical changes have contributed both to the region's current political systems, econ-omies, and societies and to its global relationships. The course pursues one major theme to ac-complish these goals - it focuses on how actions Africans have taken have affected the course of the continent's history and sub- Saharan Africa's interaction with the world.

HIST 161 – AFRICA, AFRICANS, AND ATL SLAVERY
This course is designed to root African slavery and trade in its varied African contexts. Thus, students will analyze how and why Africans were "produced" for the Atlantic slave trade and the influence African slaves had, via resistance, a slave economy, and slave culture, on the mak-ing of the Atlantic world. Prereq: Sophomore standing or above.

HIST 169 – US & ORIGINS OF THE COLD WAR
The course focuses upon United States foreign policy during the early part of the Cold War. Students will read and discuss, as well as write papers about, a number of works that examine two major issues. The first deals with the ongoing debate over the origins of the United States- Soviet Union confrontation. The second is an examination of the different ways that American policymakers sought to contain what they assumed to be were instances of Soviet "aggres-sion."

HIST 021 – EAST ASIAN TO 1600
The formation, evolution and expansion of the major cultural centers of Asia, including India, China and Japan. The principal themes are the origin and growth of various philosophies and the development of major economic, social and political trends.

HIST 022 – EAST ASIAN SINCE 1600
The transformation of East Asian societies from the arrival of Europeans to the present. The principal themes are the impact of the West, the modernization of Asia, the inception of nation-alist and communist movements and major economic, political and social developments.

HIST 128 – IMPERIAL CHINA
This course is primarily intended to help students gain a fuller understanding of the political, socio-economic, and cultural changes in imperial China (300-1800). We will explore the histo-ry of China from the collapse of the Han empire in the third century to the zenith of the Qing empire in the eighteenth century. This course also challenges the stereotype of a monolithic and static (or "ancient") China by encouraging students to develop a more critical and compli-cated understanding of the historical forces integrating and dividing that entity we now call "China". No pre-requisites.

HIST 129 – MODERN CHINA
This course is an introduction to the history of China from the seventeenth century to the pre-sent day. The course will explore the momentous changes in the relationship between state and society from the founding of the Qing empire (1636-1912) to the establishment of th Peo-ple's Republic of China (PRC). Topics to be studied include the rise of the Manchus, imperial-ism, rebellions, the self-strengthening and reform movements, nationalism, and revolution (po-litical, social, and cultural) during this period of Chinese history. No prior knowledge of Chi-nese history is assumed or required.

HIST 133 – EUROPE 19TH CENTURY
From the fires of the French Revolution to the "guns of August" beginning WWI, the course co-vers those aspects of nineteenth-century Europe - imperialism, class politics (socialism), femi-nism, technological development, and industrial capitalism - necessary to understand the 19th century was not peaceful, and that WWI was perhaps the most likely outcome.

HIST 134 – CONTEMPORARY EUROPE
Cultural and ideological trends in the 20th century, World War I and its aftermath; social, polit-ical and economic developments between the wars; World War II; the United Nations and the Cold War.

HIST 136 – OLD REGIME & FRENCH REVOLUTION
Institutional and social development of France, climaxing in the French Revolution. Special emphasis on the national and international significance of the Revolution.

HIST 125 – COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
Latin American history from European contact with indigenous peoples of the Americas through the Wars of Independence. The course is divided into three sections. The first exam-ines the geopolitical, economic, cultural, and environmental impact and consequences of Co-lumbus's voyages; the European conquest of native Americans in the Carribbean, Mexico, and South America; and the imposition of Spanish and Portuguese institutions in the New World. The second section explores the major political, economic, social, and intellectual develop-ments of the colonial period from 1550- 1750. The third and final section examines the eight-eenth- century Bourbon Reforms and the disintegration of Spanish and Portuguese America. With this course students will achieve a greater understanding of Latin American culture and gain the necessary historical background for History 126, Modern Latin America.

HIST 126 – MODERN LATIN AMERICA
History 126 is a survey of Latin American history during the national period, 1821-present. The course begins with the disintegration of Spanish and Portuguese America and then divides into three parts: 1) the political, economic, cultural trends of the nineteenth century 2) the rev-olutionary trends of the twentieth century, and 3) inter-American relations during the twenti-eth century. Each of the three parts is divided into sections devoted to the historical develop-ment of individual countries. The first section on the nineteenth century necessarily focuses on the four most important nations of modern Latin America: Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Brazil. To these four we add Cuba in the second part of the course on twentieth-century revolutions. The third and final section emphasizes the evolution of U.S. diplomatic and commercial rela-tions with Central America and the Carribbean.

POLS 075 – WORLD POLITICS
An introductory survey of the field of international relations, covering differing national per-spectives on current issues, current trends in the evolution of the international system, sources of conflict, international political economy, and the roles of international law and international organizations. Prereq.: none

POLS 095 – METHODS IN POLITICS
This course provides a broad introduction to the methods used to conduct systematic inquiry into political science. Beginning with research design considerations and literature review, students will address both qualitative and quantitative methodologies used among political science scholars, including case study analysis, comparative methods, elite interviews, empiri-cal analysis, and formal models. Pre-reqs: POLS 001 and POLS 065 and POLS 075.

POLS 121 – UN/GLOBAL SECURITY
Students explore the development of the United Nations and the record of UN efforts to pro-mote international peace and security. Students also examine a variety of proposals for UN re-form. Prereq.: POLS 75 or instructor's consent.

POLS 123 – GRASSROOTS GLOBALISM
This course examines the role that transnational social movements (TSMs) play in world poli-tics with respect to such issues as human rights, peace, the environment, development, labor and gender. TSMs are political networks of governmental organizations and activists that focus on specific issues and span two or more countries. TSMs seek social change consistent with core principled ideas. As the international role of such networks has grown in recent decades, so has the need for us to understand their origins, practices, impact and potential. Participants in the course will be required to complete 20 hours of service learning outside of regular class hours. Previous completion of POLS 75 is recommended, though not required.

POLS 124 – REVISITING VIETNAM
The Vietnam War was perhaps the most controversial international engagement in American history. This course treats Vietnam as a case study in the making of U.S. foreign policy. Our cen-tral concern will be to answer the question: What went wrong? We will examine the war through the eyes of various parties to the conflict: American policy-makers, military leaders, common soldiers, anti-war activists, public opinion and the Vietnamese themselves, both allies and adversaries. Previous completion of POLS 075 is recommended, though not required.

POLS 126 – POLITICAL ECONOMY OF GLOBALIZATION
This course will examine the political and economic dimensions of globalization. In particular, we will explore the ways in which globalization is shaped by political actions and institutions and how globalization, in turn, impacts politics within and among countries. Our focus will be on the integration of markets in the areas of trade, finance, labor and information and the im-pacts of globalization on growth, inequality and the environment. Prerequisites: POLS 075 or 065; Econ 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 127 – GLOBAL HEALTH
This course examines global public health challenges in an era of globalization. Students will explore a variety of threats to national and human security stemming from transnational pub-lic health challenges that transcend national borders.

POLS 129 – TRANSITIONS TO DEMOCRACY
Examination of the theories and practices of two types of political regimes: democracies and dictatorships. Why do so many countries want to become democratic now, and will these new democracies last? Major paper required. Prereq.: POLS 65 or instructor's consent.

POLS 134 – HIST, POLS, SOC OF MOD EGYPT
This seminar is an introduction to the history, politics, and culture of Egypt covering roughly the period from 1805 to the present. It will introduce students to some of the major questions, debates, and recurring themes in the study of contemporary Egyptian society in an interdisci-plinary and theoretically informed fashion. Some of the topics we will cover include socioeco-nomic transformations in Egyptian society from 1952 to the present, the nature of Egyptian politics and political participation, the relationship between politics and culture in Egypt, polit-ical Islam or Islamist politics, and political economy and recurrent economic crises including the most recent changes in Egypt's political economy in the 1990's (structural adjustment, pri-vatization and the socio-political consequences of these policies), the future of the republic af-ter Mubarak.

POLS 135 – ISLAM IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Since the collapse of the Iron Curtain, Islam has become to some intellectuals, policy-makers, and ordinary citizens a great menace that threatens the West and the Judo- Christian Civiliza-tion. The Green Peril in public discourse replaced Communism as the main ideological chal-lenge to Liberalism. Is Islam a genuine threat to the West? What does Islam actually mean to the billion-plus of believers worldwide? What is Islam's relation to modernity? How similar and different is Islam from the other Ibhrahimic Religions?

POLS 136 – THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT
This course focuses on the causes, evolvement, and future prospects of the Arab-Israeli conflict. It provides an in-depth understanding of the Arab-Israeli conflict as it has unfolded over the past century. By examining the roots of this conflict, its key events and crises, as well as the peace process, students will gain a deeper appreciation for the complexities and dynamism of this subject. Pre-requisite: POLS 075.

POLS 156 – EVIRON POLITICS & POLICY
Analysis of the relationship between political and economic forces and environmental control of such problems as the population explosion, air-water pollution, nuclear contamination, ur-ban congestion, and rural deterioration. Prereq.: POLS 1 and/or ENV 35-56, or instructor's consent.

POLS 160 – MODERN EUROPE POLITICAL SYS
Comparative analysis of the political structures, cultures and institutions of government in se-lected Western and Eastern European nations. Examination of the European Community, the sovereignty of EC members, and other issues influencing politics in contemporary Europe. Pre-req.: POLS 65 or instructor's consent.

POLS 161 – POLS RUSSIA & FORMER SOVIET UN
After an overview of the Soviet political system and its breakdown, the course will devote sev-eral weeks to contemporary Russian politics, especially since 2000. It will also cover Central and Eastern Europe since 1989, with a special emphasis on current political developments.

POLS 162 – GOVERNMENT & POLITICS OF CHINA
Examination of the Chinese political tradition, revolution, and the People's Republic. Attention given to geographical, historical, social, cultural, and economic foundations of political devel-opment and to contemporary issues and problems. Prereq: POLS 065 or instructor's consent.

POLS 163 – GOV’T & POLITICS OF JAPAN
Examination of the political system of Japan with attention to both political tradition and con-temporary politics, including analyses of historical and social foundations, political groups and parties, and major issues in domestic and foreign policy. Prereq.: POLS 65 or instructor's con-sent.

POLS 164 – GOV’T & POL IN LAT AM
Contemporary analysis of Latin American political systems. Emphasis on political and econom-ic development, democratization, political culture and relations with extra-regional actors. Prereq.: POLS 65 or instructor's consent.

POLS 165 – GOV’T & POL DEVEL NATIONS
Comparative analysis of the structures, processes and problems of political systems in develop-ing countries. Particular attention to Africa and the theories of political development. Prereq.: POLS 65 or instructor's consent.

POLS 169 – TOPICS/COMPAR GOV
Units of study focusing on special issues, problems or developments in comparative govern-ment and politics. Prereq.: POLS 65 or instructor's consent.

POLS 170 – INTERNATIONAL LAW
Examination of extent to which international law governs interactions among states in con-temporary world politics. Exploration of fundamental principles of international law and their possible erosion in recent decades as a result of growing support for new international legal norms such as human rights. Prereq.: POLS 75 or instructor's consent.

POLS 171 – POL INTEGRATION OF EUROPE
Examination of Europe's various attempts at unification since W.W.II, with special emphasis on both the role of individual member states within the European Union and the role of the EU as an international organization operating within the international community. Prereq.: POLS 65

POLS 172 – INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
Exploration of the political dimensions of international economic relations. Topics include in-ternational trade and monetary affairs; multi-national corporations; north-south relations; Third World debt; and the foreign economic strategies of various states. Prereq.: POLS 75 or instructor's consent.

POLS 173 – HUMAN RIGHTS/WORLD POL
Examination of the politics of human rights and the changing nature of sovereignty in the in-ternational system. Special attention to major threats to human rights in the contemporary world, and to cultural and political obstacles to international consensus on human rights norms and the appropriate mechanisms for their implementation. Prereq.: POLS 75 or instruc-tor's consent.

POLS 174 – POLS IN MIDDLE EAST
Examination of political relations in the Middle East and the region's place in international pol-itics. Emphasis is given to historical context, geographic and cultural foundations, types of po-litical regimes, policy orientations of key states, and the region's principal problems and issues.

POLS 176 – GENDER/INTERNATIONAL REL
Examination of the way considerations of gender challenge traditional approaches to the study of world politics, with special attention to national security, war and peace, human rights and economic development. A large part of the course focuses on how women have been affected by global politics. Prereq.: POLS 75 or instructor's consent. May be used as part of Women's Studies Concentration.

POLS 177 – MODEL EUROPEAN UNION
Optional laboratory-type course which complements POLS 171; European Integration. This course entails going to The Midwest Model European Union Simulation in Indianapolis for three days in April or to another recognized simulation. Students may take the course more than once for credit. Prereq.: POLS 171 or 160.

POLS 178 – US/E ASIAN RELATIONS
Examination of American-East Asian relations in historical and theoretical perspectives. Topics include the open door policy, the Pacific War, the war in Korea, the quagmire in Vietnam, and Japan's economic challenge. Prereq.: POLS 75 or instructor's consent.

POL 179 – AM FOREIGN POLICY
An analysis of patterns and trends in recent American foreign policy and an examination of the process of foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the president, Congress, the bu-reaucracy, the military, pressure groups, public opinion and other forces. Prereq: POLS 75 or instructor's consent.

REL 001 – INTRO REL STUDY
Introduction to methods and topics in the study of religion, using materials from the Bible, classical literature and modern theology.

REL 005 – TOPICS REL STUDIES
This is a minicourse approach to topics of contemporary interest and relevance in the field of religious studies, as well as to topics related to religion in other disciplines. Each minicourse is a topic independent of the others.

REL 051 – OLD TESTAMENT
A study of the literature and theological message of the Old Testament within the context of the history of the Israelite people.

REL 052 – NEW TESTAMENT
A study of the literature and theological message of the New Testament within the context of early Christian history.

REL 053 – LIFE & TEACHINGS OF JESUS
A reconstruction of the life and message of Jesus of Nazareth from the Gospels of the New Tes-tament against the background of his Palestinian cultural and religious environment.

REL 091 – CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL PRACTICES
Study of contemporary ethical problems from the perspective of philosophical and religious principles. Various sections of the course may specialize in different types of ethical problems. Crosslisted with Phil 091. May be used as part of Women's Studies Concentration.

REL 104 – DEVEL OF WEST REL
Study of major Western religious ideas and the historical contexts within which they have aris-en. Prereq.: A religion course or PHIL 21.

REL 110 – INTRO JUDAISM
An introductory study of the Jewish tradition from antiquity to today. Jewish history, thought, culture, life cycle, and ceremonies are examined. Contemporary Judaism is particularly empha-sized. Sponsored by the Jewish Chautaqua Society.

REL 111 – EASTERN PHILOSOPHY
An examination of the philosophical ideas contained within the core texts of Hinduism, Bud-dhism, Confucianism, and Daoism, with special emphasis on the way in which Southeast Asian and East Asian "philosophies" challenge the commonplace Western distinction between phi-losophy and religion.

REL 113 – JUDAISM-JESUS TIME
An in-depth study of first-century Judaism. The course examines Jewish belief, society and val-ues during this critical time in history. The environment out of which early Christianity grew is explored, as well as commonalities and differences of the two faith traditions during this peri-od. The historical Jesus is seen in his environment. The question of "How did Christianity arise from Judaism?" is answered. Sponsored by the Jewish Chautauqua Society.

REL 140 – ECOLOGICAL ETHICS
This course introduces students to the emerging field of environmental and ecological ethics and the spectrum of responses to the questions, issues, and dilemmas posed by the contempo-rary global ecological crisis. We examine fundamental issues such as how human beings should relate to the rest of nature, the historical roots of the ecological crisis, and the intersection of ecological and social justice issues in various responses to the ecological crisis. Prereq.: A reli-gion course.

REL 155 – LIBERATION THEOLOGY
Study of the emerging field of liberation and feminist theologies as these disciplines are related to contemporary religious, social, and political issues in Latin America and North America. The course explores the relation between theological reflection, social context, and the social- polit-ical location of theologians. May be used as part of Women's Studies Concentration.

REL 185 – CONTEMP RELG LIFE IN CENTRAL AMERICA
In this course, we will explore the particular religious landscape of Nicaragua and Costa Rica, including the range of expressions of religiosity (Christianity will be a significant focus). We will explore first hand the ways in which particular forms of religious understanding have in-formed particular kinds of political and social activity in both of these countries. We will pay particularly close attention to the differences and relationships between official institutional religious teachings and the religious sensibilities and practices of communities and laypeople (in the in-travel portion of the course, we will have the opportunity to meet with persons from an array of locations in this regard). Comparative analysis of the different religious formations of these two areas will be a primary consideration. Care will be taken to consider the im-portance of studying religious life in its appropriate historical and cultural context. Enrolled students must also register for SCSS 196, Sustainable Development in Central America.

ECON 162 – MARXIAN POLITICAL ECONOMY
Marxian analysis of the capitalist economy; the theory of surplus value and exploitation; the theory of income distribution, theories of price, wage, and profit determination; conditions for reproduction and expansion of capitalism; competition; technological innovations and eco-nomic growth; the nature of economic crises under capitalism; globalization of capital; and re-lated issues. Prereq.: ECON 1 or ECON 2.

ECON 175 – DEVELOPING ECONOMIES
Patterns and prospects for development in the less developed countries of the world. Charac-teristics of low income countries, the economics of the development process built around al-ternative theories of economics development. Prereq.: ECON 001, ECON 002, and MATH 020 or higher.

ECON 180 – REGULATION & ANTITRUST POLICY
Economic foundations, history, and recent developments in government policy promoting competition and regulating monopolies. Emphasis on U.S. policy, with occasional comparisons to the European Union and other countries. Prereq.: ECON 002 and MATH 028 or higher.

POLS 165 – GOV’T POL DEVEL NATNS
Comparative analysis of the structures, processes and problems of political systems in develop-ing countries. Particular attention to Africa and the theories of political development. Prereq.: POLS 65 or instructor's consent.

POLS 167 – SUPREME COURT & ELECTIONS
Examination of the relationship between the judiciary and electoral politics in the United States and other Western Style democracies. Exploration of issues of democratic competition, representation and campaign finance. Special attention to equality and fairness and the empir-ical study of representative government. Prereq.: POLS 001 or permission of instructor.

POLS 128 – NATIONALISM/POLITICS E. EUROPE
Analysis of nationalism in its various forms: ethnic, religious, civic and political; and discussion of its influence on the development of new governments in several formerly communist East-ern European nations. Prereq.: POLS 65, 75, or instructor's consent.

POLS 160 – MODERN EUROPE POLITICAL SYS
Comparative analysis of the political structures, cultures and institutions of government in se-lected Western and Eastern European nations. Examination of the European Community, the sovereignty of EC members, and other issues influencing politics in contemporary Europe. Pre-req.: POLS 65 or instructor's consent.

POLS 161 – POLS RUSSIA & FORMER SOVIET UN
After an overview of the Soviet political system and its breakdown, the course will devote sev-eral weeks to contemporary Russian politics, especially since 2000. It will also cover Central and Eastern Europe since 1989, with a special emphasis on current political developments.

POLS 171 – POL INTEGRATION OF EUROPE
Examination of Europe's various attempts at unification since W.W.II, with special emphasis on both the role of individual member states within the European Union and the role of the EU as an international organization operating within the international community. Prereq.: POLS 65 or POLS 75 or instructor's consent.

POLS 164 – GOV’T & POL IN LAT AM
Contemporary analysis of Latin American political systems. Emphasis on political and econom-ic development, democratization, political culture and relations with extra-regional actors. Prereq.: POLS 65 or instructor's consent.

SCS 120 – MODES OF CULTURAL INQUIRY
How does a writer's social position affect the production of his or her writing about the social world? This course challenges students to develop a practice of reflexivity in cultural analysis. A focus on centrality of language and representation in cultural analysis will give participants an opportunity to experience these dilemmas first-hand as they engage in the practices of so-cial inquiry through analysis, reading, and writing. We will discuss empirical or written mate-rials; possible modes of inquiry include discourse analysis, various forms of ethnography, in-terviewing, textual analysis, and other methods of research and criticism.

SCSS 001 – SURVEY OF SOCIOLOGY
A survey of the substantive areas of study and the theoretical and methodological tools of the discipline of sociology.

SCSS 013 – SOCIETY/CULTURE/AFRICAN AMER
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of society, culture, and race with a primary focus on African Americans. The course explores the various ways race has shaped the lives and experiences of people living in the U.S. in a wide range of social, economic, historical, and cultural contexts. May be used as part of Women's Studies Concentration.

SCSS 061 – ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
Environmental sociology examines the relationship between human communities and the nat-ural environment in the modern world. In particular, it focuses on how political, economic and cultural institutions shape our interactions with the natural environment. This course also consdiers how societies are responding to environmental problems on a global and local level, with special attention to the intersection of environmental problems and social inequality. Spe-cific topics of study may include industrial pollution, environmental ideologies, global climate change, and natural disasters, among others.

SCSS 071 – ENVIRONMENTALISM IN THE U.S.
This course uses sociological concepts and methods to examine contemporary environmental movements. Students will learn about the idealogical and organizational diversity of environ-mental movements, consider beliefs and experiences that lead people to participate in these movements, and study the ways that environmental activism is shaped by social structure and social institutions. Movements considered may be ones that focus on wilderness protection, animal rights, anti-pollution activism, environmental justice, buying "green," and others.

SCSS 072 – GLOBAL SOCIAL CHANGE
In this class, we will examine and critique dominant conceptualizations of globalization and economic development. Globalization and economic development are two interconnected con-cepts, constructed through the same historical and social contexts of unequal power relations. Both words are tyically understood as something positive, and something that "we" in the United States have that "they" do not. In the class, participants will look at how dominant eco-nomic development and globalization ideologies emerged, how they operate, and how they are resisted. This course will investigate alternative ways of imagining and constructing global so-cial change using discussion, case studies, fiction, lectures and writing. Prereq: One course numbered Anth 002-025 or Soc 001-025 or instructor consent. Fulfills Internation-al/Multicultural Area of Inquiry.

SCSS 077 – THE ART OF THE INTERVIEW
Qualitative interviewing as a sociological method allows the researcher to look at the complex interpretive practices participants use to make sense of life events. As a method, it is distinct from surveys, polls, or journalistic interviews. In this course, readings, discussion, and assign-ments will teach qualitative interviewing for two purposes. First, students will develop skills in this important sociological method. Second, students will explore the Drake engaged citizen topic for the current year through qualitative interviewing and collective interpretation of the interviews.

SCSS 130 – CONTEMP CHINESE SOCIETY
An examination of various aspects of social life in post- imperial China. The course aims to in-crease understanding of dominant 20th-century cultural and institutional practices and their links to the past. It also aims to heighten a reflexive sense of awareness among those studying China as an "other" culture and the implications this positioning has for the knowledge such inquiry produces. May be used as part of Women's Studies Concentration.

SCSS 133 – SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY
A survey of sociological theory, emphasizing the major questions posed by 19th and early 20th century social theorists about the nature of social life. Prereq.: Completion of six hours of soci-ology or anthropology courses or instructor's consent. Counts toward SOC and ANSO theory-intensive requirements.

SCSS 173 – GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP
What does it mean to be a global citizen? In this class, we will work to construct definitions of what it means to think and act from this identity category. Through both global and transna-tional contexts we will explore the idea of citizenship in relationship to identity, allegiance, eth-ics, and hybridity. This course will also focus on research and action as global citizens; students will reflect on and enact their own practices as global citizens. Because this is a sociology course, an emphasis will be placed on the social construction of the category of citizen, rela-tionships among individuals, groups, and societies, and the interaction between social struc-tures and human agency. May be used as part of Women's Studies Concentration.

WLC 148 – INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
The discipline of intercultural communication deals with human interactions between and among culturally different individuals in the context of the globalizing world as well as U.S. co-cultures. The purpose of this course is to raise students' awareness of "cultural relativity" as an ethical guiding principle, which prompts them to recognize the danger of ethnocentric arro-gance and come to respect other cultures. It is also important for students to understand that their usually unconscious absolute dogmatism to view their own culture as superior to others (e.g. "the greatest nation on Earth") will hinder their foreign-language acquisition, because any foreign language they attempt to learn has a unique configuration of denotations and connota-tions, which is quite different from their own. In hort, students must strive to learn how to see "reality" from within the culture of a foreign language rather than from their own. Three major components of the course are intercultural communication theories, foreign language language acquisition, and mass media images.

CBPA News
September 15, 2016
A series of free and low-cost public events at Drake University will highlight the experiences of social justice leaders from developing countries around the world.
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