Archives

The Drake Law School's archives document the history of the Law School and Law Library.

This page details the policies and procedures of the archive as well as material that should (and should not) be deposited.

Using the Archives

Patrons may ask at the Information Desk for in-library use of materials during regular reference hours.

Some documents in the collection have restricted access and are not available to the public. Researchers should direct questions to David Hanson (david.hanson@drake.edu) if they want to use any materials in the collection.

Material is continuously being added to the archive. To search or browse by subject, see the online Drake University archives listing. Note: Cowles Library also uses this system, so materials located there are also listed.

Collection Development

The Drake Law School archive serves as the final repository for the historical records of Drake Law School and Law Library.

Its primary purpose is to document the history of the Law School & Law Library and to provide source material for administrators, faculty, students, alumni, and other members of the Law School and Law Library community, as well as scholars, authors, and other interested persons who seek to evaluate the impact of the Law School and Law Library's activities.

What is an archive?  
"Materials created or received by a person, family, or organization, public or private, in the conduct of their affairs and preserved because of the enduring value contained in the information they contain or as evidence of the functions and responsibilities of their creator, especially those materials maintained using the principles of provenance, original order, and collective control; permanent records." (Archives.org Glossary)

Core Mission

The Drake Law School archive, established in 2009, is a secure repository where records of Drake Law School and Law Library having permanent value are preserved, maintained, and made available for research and reference use. The archive contains non-current records of the Law School and Law Library that have lasting administrative, legal, or historical value.

The core mission of the Drake Law School archives is as follows:

  • To appraise, collect, organize, describe, make available, and preserve records of historical, legal, fiscal, and/or administrative value to Drake Law School and Law Library.
  • To provide adequate facilities for the retention and preservation of such records.
  • To provide information services that will assist the operation of the Law School, Law Library, and Drake University.
  • To serve research and scholarship by making available and encouraging the use of its collections by members of the Law School, Law Library, Drake University, and the community at large.
  • To promote knowledge and understanding of the origins, aims, programs, and goals of the Law School, Law Library and Drake University, and of the development of these aims, goals, and programs.
  • To implement records management by formulating policy and procedures that will ensure the collection and preservation of archival materials.

Collection Development Policy

The Drake Law School archives is the official repository for all non-current records of the Law School and Law Library. The archive strives to preserve Law School and Law Library records for the purposes of:

  • Maintaining a clear account of Law School and Law Library life and achievements, administrative policy and actions, and educational programs.
  • Reinforcing an image of the Law School and Law Library that stimulates financial support and encourages an appreciation of the Law School and Law Library's past and its role in the history of law and/or Drake University among students, faculty, and alumni.
  • Making available a body of records useful for student, casual, and scholarly research in history and other disciplines.

The archives must rely on the cooperation and support of administrators, deans, directors, faculty, students, and alumni to ensure that materials of historical value are collected and preserved.

The Law School archives will promote school-wide records management and collect material in the following categories from all administrative and academic units of the school:

1. OFFICIAL RECORDS, PAPERS, AND PUBLICATIONS OF DRAKE LAW SCHOOL and LAW LIBRARY
Official records encompass the records or papers generated or received by the various administrative offices of Drake Law School and Law Library in the conduct of their business. These records may be in print or electronic format and will include:

  • Minutes, memoranda, correspondence and reports of the board of trustees.
  • Records of the office of the dean, associate dean, and assistant dean, including correspondence, administrative subject files, and reports.
  • Correspondence, subject files, and reports of the dean, associate dean, assistant dean, and administrators of the divisions and programs of the Law School and Law Library.
  • Correspondence, subject files, and reports of the offices of central administration, including: administration, records coordinator, Admissions and financial aid, budget, and advancement.
  • Minutes, memoranda, and reports of all major academic and administrative commissions, councils, and committees.
  • Departmental and center records, including: minutes, reports, correspondence, and syllabi.
  • Accreditation reports and supporting documentation.
  • Annual budget and audit reports.
  • Records of the registrar, including timetables, class schedules, enrollment reports, graduation rosters, and other reports issued on a regular basis.
  • Alumni records, including minutes of the alumni associations.
  • Reports of the Office of Admission and Financial Aid.
  • Records of student organizations.
  • All publications, newsletters, and booklets distributed in the name of Drake Law School and/or Law Library, including catalogs, special bulletins, yearbooks, student newspapers, directories and faculty/staff rosters, faculty and administration newsletters, and publications, alumni publications, and ephemeral material.
  • Photoprints, negatives, slides, audio and video film, tapes and reels, oral history interviews, and optical and compact discs documenting the development of the Law School and Law Library.
  • Maps, prints, and architectural drawings documenting the physical changes and development of the Law School and Law Library.
  • Reports of research projects, including grant records.
  • Artifacts relating to the history of Drake Law School and Law Library.

The official administrative records of Drake Law School and Law Library (correspondence, reports, and subject files) designated as archival should be inactive and no longer used in the current activities of the originating office.

Records should be forwarded to the archives according to schedule after consulting with the library for the orderly transfer of non-current materials. An inventory of records transferred should accompany accessioned material.

The originating office may place restrictions on access to non-current records in addition to the restrictions on administrative, board of trustees, employee, and student records described in the Access Policy Statement.

2. PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL PAPERS OF DRAKE LAW SCHOOL FACULTY
The Law School Archives seeks to acquire, organize, and provide access to the personal and professional papers of Drake Law School faculty as a means of documenting the internal life and culture of the school community.

Space and staff restraints in the Law School archives limits the volume of faculty papers that can be accessioned.

In appraising and soliciting faculty papers, the following criteria are suggested:

  • National or international reputation
  • Record of service with Drake Law School and contribution to its growth and development
  • Service on the faculty of a recognized area of excellence within Drake Law School
  • Service and contribution in community, state, and national affairs

The Law School archives seeks documentation of the careers of Drake Law School and Law Library faculty in the following formats (print or electronic):

  • Correspondence: official, professional, and personal
  • Biographical material: resumes, bibliographies, biographical sketches, chronologies, genealogies, newspaper clippings, and personal memoirs
  • Photoprints and graphic materials
  • Recordings of lectures, speeches, and discussions
  • Lecture notes and syllabi
  • Research files
  • Departmental or committee minutes and records
  • Drafts and manuscripts of articles and books
  • Diaries, notebooks, appointment calendars, and memorabilia

The Law School archives recognizes the rights of faculty and private donors to impose reasonable restrictions on materials to protect privacy and confidentiality. Restrictions on access should be for a fixed term and determined at the time of donation. The archives encourages minimal access restrictions consistent with the legal rights of all parties.

3. SPECIAL COLLECTION
The Law School archives will solicit and collect records and papers that are neither official school records nor faculty papers, but that relate to the history of Drake Law School and Law Library.

Examples include:

  • Professional and personal papers of the members of the University council/board of trustees if associated with Law School/Law Library business.
  • Professional and personal papers of eminent alumni relating their Drake Law School and/or Law Library experiences.
  • Papers or records dealing with the history of Drake University, Des Moines, the greater Des Moines area, or Iowa as they relate to the growth and development of the Law School and Law Library.
  • Papers, records, and published items on Drake Law School and& Law Library.

EXCEPTIONS TO THE ABOVE COLLECTING GUIDELINES:
Records may not be accepted into the archives if they are in a format which requires special, outdated, or antiquated equipment to access and/or if the library does not already own such equipment or purchase of equipment would be prohibitively expensive.

Disposition Schedule

The Disposition Schedule contains the instructions governing the retention (and disposition) of records into the Law School archives.

Guidelines on Types of Records to Transfer

The Drake Law School archive is the official repository for the records of Drake Law School and Law Library that have long-term historical, legal, fiscal, and administrative value. The mission of the archives is to manage and make accessible these information resources in support of administration, teaching, research, and service.

When ready to transfer records, review and follow the procedures outlined in the Procedures for Transfer of Archive Records (below).

The following guidelines will assist administrators, faculty, and staff in identifying those portions of their files that are appropriate for transfer to the archives. Records commonly transferred to the archives include, but are not limited to, the following material:

  • Constitutions and by-laws, minutes and proceedings, transcripts, and lists of officers of Law School bodies
  • Office Files: correspondence and memoranda (incoming and outgoing) and subject files concerning projects, activities, and functions
  • Historical files documenting policies, decisions, committee and task force reports, and questionnaires
  • Publications: newsletters, journals, brochures, monographs, programs, posters, and announcements issued by the Law School or Law Library (the archives should be placed on college, department, and office mailing lists to receive all future publications)
  • Audio-visuals: photographs, digital images, films, and sound and video recordings
  • Personal papers of students, faculty, and staff that relate to the Law School's work

Records which generally should not be transferred to the archives include:

  • Records of specific financial transactions
  • Routine letters of transmittal and acknowledgment
  • Non-personally addressed correspondence such as "Deans and Directors" memoranda (except for one record copy from the issuing office)
  • Requests for publications or information after the requests have been filled
  • Replies to questionnaires if the results are recorded and preserved either in the archives or in a published report

Academic Personnel

Some faculty record series should be sent to the Law School archives in the Drake Law Library. Contact David Hanson at david.hanson@drake.edu regarding the disposition and transfer of this material. Full faculty records are only accepted under the limited guidelines laid out in the Collection Development Policy.

The following guidelines will assist faculty in identifying those portions of their files that are appropriate for transfer to the archives. Records commonly transferred to the archives include, but are not limited to, the following material:

  • Vita
  • Faculty reports
  • Drake University/Law School/Law Library news releases regarding faculty member

Student Organizations

The primary mission of the Drake Law School archive is to collect, organize, make accessible, and preserve records documenting the Law School and Law Library's origins and development and the activities and achievements of its officers, faculty, students, alumni, and benefactors. Documenting Drake Law School student organizations/student life is a major objective of the archives.

The following guidelines will assist student organizations in identifying those portions of their files that are appropriate for transfer to the archives. Records commonly transferred to the Archives include, but are not limited to, the following material:

  • Constitutions and by-laws, minutes and proceedings, transcripts, and lists of officers
  • Office files: correspondence and memoranda (incoming and outgoing) and subject files concerning projects, activities, and functions
  • Historical files documenting policies, decisions, committee and task force reports and proceedings, and questionnaires
  • Publications: newsletters, journals, brochures, monographs, programs, posters, and announcements issued by the organization or its subdivisions (the Law Library should be placed on organization’s mailing lists to receive all future publications)
  • Audio-visuals: photographs, digital images, films, and sound and video recordings

Records which generally should not be transferred to the archives include:

  • Records of specific financial transactions
  • Routine letters of transmittal and acknowledgment
  • Non-personally addressed correspondence
  • Requests for publications or information after the requests have been filled
  • Replies to questionnaires if the results are recorded and preserved either in the Archives or in a published report

Additional Notes

All information formats (e.g., published, typescript, audio-visual, and electronic data, such as computer disks and files) are appropriate for consideration for transfer.

For documents in formats requiring any form of machine intervention, such as videotapes, kinescopes, and all computer files, consideration should be given to transferring the equipment needed to access the documents or, preferably, converting the documents to a format accessible to the archives' users. Early consultation with the library is strongly encouraged for all such materials.

These lists are intended as general guides. If there are questions about records not listed or about the retention or disposal of specific record series, email David Hanson at david.hanson@drake.edu.

If records are not listed on a records disposition schedule, do not throw them out. First contact the library.

Procedure for Transfer of Archive Records

The following is the procedure for transferring archive records:

  • The disposition of Law School and Law Library records should be managed according to the records disposition schedule. If your records have not been scheduled, email David Hanson at david.hanson@drake.edu. Do not destroy records that have not been scheduled.
  • Do not send records to the Law School archives without first consulting with the library staff.
  • The archives prefers annual transfers of these records. To set up a transfer schedule, contact an archivist for assistance.
  • When you are ready to transfer records, notify David Hanson (david.hanson@drake.edu).
  • If you are transferring a large volume of records, the library staff may first examine the records onsite.
  • If you detect the presence of mold, mildew, insects, etc., in your records, contact the library staff immediately and a staff member will examine the records onsite.
  • If the records are brittle or fragile, contact the library and a staff member will examine the records onsite.

Packing and Labeling of the Boxes

Records should be packed in the order in which they were kept in the office.

How to Use the Disposition Schedule

1. Examine the record at hand. Determine the following:

  • Its name
  • Its function
  • If it is the "record" copy

This step is important as only one copy needs to go into the archive. If your office was not the creator of the record, you are probably not responsible for the archive copy.

2. Locate the record on the schedule.

  • Note whether the document should be sent to the archive or can be kept and destroyed by the creating office.
  • If the document is not on the schedule, check with the Law Library to make sure it is OK to dispose of it.

3. If the document was listed and is to be sent to the archive, send the document to the archive.


For more information, contact the Drake Law Library at 515-271-3189 or stop by the Information Desk.

Law School Events
June 5, 2017
June 6, 2017
Law School News
May 22, 2017
Drake Law School alumnus Terry Branstad, LW’74, the longest-serving governor in our nation’s history, has officially been confirmed as United States Ambassador to China.
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