Course Descriptions E-F

Course Credit Information

A – Usually offered during alternate years
CR/NC – Credit if course is passed; no credit if course is not passed
N – Not regularly offered
S – May be offered as a seminar
2-3 – Credit may vary between 2 and 3 credits
SK – Skills course
*New course

214. EDUCATION LAW. 3 A
Course examines the range of problems in public education, including control of student conduct and expression; competing roles of teachers, administrators, and the community in school governance; and the impact of testing, grouping, and grading students. Prerequisites: Constitutional Law I (LAW 112).

503. ELDER LAW CLINIC. 4-6 CR/F SK
Students enrolled in this clinical program represent senior citizens in civil matters. Among the types of cases are those involving elder abuse, nursing home and health-related issues, and consumer fraud. Students conduct intakes, interviews, and fact investigations; draft legal documents, including wills, durable powers of attorney, and advance health care directives; and represent clients in a variety of forums, including court and administrative proceedings. Students are required to attend a two-day, pre-semester orientation. Limited to students who have completed two or more semesters of law school. If only two semesters of law school have been completed, or the student is otherwise ineligible to receive a student practice license, special permission from the instructor must be obtained prior to enrolling.

281. ELECTION LAW. 2-3 A
This course examines the laws, regulations, and agencies that govern federal and state elections. Material covered includes the laws and cases that apply to election administration, campaign finance, the right to vote, representation and redistricting, partisan gerrymandering, bribery and corruption, judicial elections, ballot access, and ballot propositions. The course also examines the role of the Federal Election Commission and comparable state election agencies.

302. EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION LITIGATION. 3A SK
An examination of the individual and class action theories of antidiscrimination law in the area of employment; the requisite evidentiary proof (direct, circumstantial, and statistical); and the injunctive and monetary remedies that can be obtained. Major emphasis is on the federal statutes that bar discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, and disability. Students will argue a summary judgment motion in an actual case from Judge Bennett’s docket and write a judicial opinion.

266. EMPLOYMENT LAW. 3
Course considers the legal relationships between employer and employee, primarily outside the union context. Material covered includes the establishment of the employment relationship; terms and conditions of employment; occupational safety, health and disabling injury, and illness; and termination of the employment relationship. An emphasis is placed on the application of casebook principles to practical problems, solutions, and strategies encountered in the practice of employment law.

285. ENTERTAINMENT LAW. 3
This course provides a comprehensive overview of the law and business of the entertainment industry. It will incorporate the four broad areas encompassing entertainment law: (1) the evaluation and application of common and statutory law from various legal disciplines, including contract, tort, and intellectual property law, to the complex concept of entertainment; (2) business and corporate implications; (3) collective bargaining and employment law issues; and (4) economic evaluations of various media-based projects. The overall objectives include exposing students to the complex structure of the entertainment business and allowing students to develop the analytical and problem-solving skills necessary to make them effective entertainment lawyers.

519. ENTREPRENEURIAL/TRANSACTIONAL CLINIC. 4-6 CR/F
Students enrolled in the Entrepreneurial/Transactional Clinic will provide comprehensive legal services to business startups, entrepreneurs, and community nonprofit organizations to help establish successful “for profit” and nonprofit enterprises.   The Clinic’s target clients include those entrepreneurs and business innovators, who are not able to afford retained legal counsel, and who are located in several underserved Des Moines neighborhoods. 
An ET Clinic student will interview assigned clients about their specific business ideas and plans.  Students will provide advice to the client about choice of entities and then draft the requisite organization documents for the client.  Depending on the type of entity selected, the student will create articles of incorporation and bylaws, or LLC certificates of organization and operating agreements.   A student may also evaluate a client’s need for the protection of the client’s intellectual property.  This may trigger trademark or tradename registration with applicable state and federal agencies. Students also may furnish legal representation regarding common issues that confront small business owners, including, employment agreements and policies, Sub-S elections, leases, purchase agreements, financing arrangements, buy-sell agreements, and independent contractor agreements.  The ET Clinic’s general mission is to afford students an opportunity to apply classroom legal doctrines to real life business ventures – and help each student develop basic practice skills for common “deal making” situations that will confront them as practicing lawyers.  Prerequisite: Business Associations (LAW 204).

231. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW. 3
A study of federal and state laws designed to address the problems of air and water pollution, toxic substance, solid waste and hazardous waste disposal, and the political and social impediments to improvement of the environment.

626. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW INTERNSHIP. 2-3 CR/F
Students serve as interns with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources or the Environmental Division of the Iowa Attorney General's Office.

062. ENVIRONMENTAL PRACTICE. 3 A SK
The practice and procedure of environmental law with an exploration of several in-depth, substantive areas. Students study problems in environmental compliance and enforcement and complete exercises in client counseling, negotiation, and litigation against and on behalf of state and federal environmental agencies. Paper required. Prerequisite: Environmental Law (LAW 231).

312. ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION OF AGRICULTURE. 3
A focus on the increasing application of environmental protection laws to agriculture with an emphasis on understanding how efforts to protect soil and water resources shape agricultural production. Subjects include the impact of farming on the environment; concepts of land stewardship; federal and state laws concerning areas such as agricultural land preservation, livestock feeding facilities, pesticide registration and use, and organic food protection; the impact of environmental liability on land transactions; and sustainable agriculture.

063. ESTATE PLANNING. 4 A SK
Principles from wills and trusts, property, insurance, taxation, and business associations are combined to form a unified plan for the disposition of a decedent's wealth. Estate, gift and generation skipping taxation will be discussed. Drafting of dispositive instruments is emphasized. Prerequisites: Wills and Trusts (LAW 223). Federal Income Tax (LAW 208). Note that Federal Estate & Gift Taxation will no longer be taught as a separate course, but this material will be included within Estate Planning.

114. ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY (LEGAL). 3
Study of the legal profession and lawyers' organizations, including codes of ethics and conduct rules that make up the law governing lawyers. The role of lawyers in society, regulation of the practice of law, and the jurisprudence of lawyer licensing and discipline cases are examined.

603. ETHICS INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/F
Students are placed with the Iowa Board of Professional Ethics and Conduct. Interns work on all phases of complaints, performing fact finding, research, and assisting prosecuting attorneys at ethics hearings before the Grievance Commission.

113. EVIDENCE. 4
An examination of the rules of evidence, focusing primarily on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Topics covered include: relevance, character evidence, hearsay and exceptions, confrontation, direct and cross examination, impeachment, rehabilitation, lay opinions, expert evidence, best evidence, authentication, and judicial notice.

237. FAMILY LAW. 3
An examination of the rights and obligations attending the status of marriage and its dissolution, rights and responsibilities arising from the family relationship, adoption, and child abuse.

235. FEDERAL COURTS AND JURISDICTION. 3
An examination of the jurisdiction of the federal courts and the interrelationship of the federal and state judicial systems. Among areas studied in detail are justiciability (such as standing, ripeness, and political question doctrines), federal question and diversity jurisdiction, removal, and conflicts between federal and state courts (such as injunctions, abstention, and habeas corpus).

218. FEDERAL CRIMINAL LAW. 3
Designed to teach students how to practice federal criminal law, this course covers substantive federal crimes, federal sentencing guidelines, federal rules, mandatory minimum sentences, sentencing enhancers, all stages of federal court proceedings, and landmark federal cases that impact the federal practitioner. Course covers drugs, guns, white collar crimes, immigration offenses, child pornography, and other areas. Attendance of federal court proceedings is mandatory.

208. FEDERAL INCOME TAXATION. 4
An in-depth study of individual income tax concepts and rules, including gross income, deductions, exemptions, tax credits, the sale/exchange of assets, like-kind exchanges, involuntary conversions, and sale of personal residence. Course also offers an overview of tax accounting, tax litigation, employee benefits, the tax planning process, and an introduction to tax research.

609. FEDERAL PUBLIC DEFENDER INTERNSHIP. 3 CR/F
Students are exposed to the practical application of substantive law to the defense of criminal charges in the federal courts. Interns shadow a supervising attorney through at least one entire criminal proceeding, from arrest through appeal. Interns draft legal documents, interview witnesses and clients, and participate in plea bargaining.

253. FEDERAL TAX PROCEDURE. 2
Course examines administrative procedures with reference to the audit of tax returns, prelitigation with analysis of rules of practice, settlement procedures and trial strategy, tax refund litigation, preparation and submission of ruling requests to district offices and national offices, offers in compromise, assessments, collections, administrative summonses, injunctive proceedings, and penalties. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax (LAW 208).

101. FIRST-YEAR TRIAL PRACTICUM. 0
The trial practicum adds an important experiential learning dimension to the first-year curriculum. Students observe a live jury trial in its entirety, which serves as an educational introduction to litigation and trial practice. The trial takes place in the court room of the Neal and Bea Smith Law Center. A combination of small group discussions, practice panels, lectures, and debriefings with litigants and jurors allow students to witness the integration of legal theory and law practice.

307. FIRST AMENDMENT SEMINAR. 3 N
The following topics will be covered: free speech methodology, prior restraint, unprotected and less protected speech, places available for speech, freedom of association, freedom of the press, and the free exercise and establishment clauses. U.S. Supreme Court decisions are emphasized throughout the course. The course will also cover some secondary readings that help explicate the cases. Selected procedural concepts and judicial doctrines may also be considered. This is a seminar and the grade will be based primarily on a paper. Students will write a draft paper, and there will be feedback on the draft. This class may be used to fulfill the writing requirement.

230. FOOD AND THE LAW. 3
A comprehensive review of legal issues concerning the operation of America's food system. The course examines the role of law in shaping the food system and considers issues such as food safety and inspection, food labeling laws, systems to improve food quality, hunger relief programs, the relation between food production and environmental protection, organic food laws, and international trade and food safety standards.

625. FORECLOSURE DEFENSE INTERNSHIP. 3 CR/F
Students spend one semester working for the Foreclosure Defense Project at Iowa Legal Aid.

801C. FOUNDATIONS OF LAW. 3 (Professional Certificate Only)
This course introduces common law doctrines relevant to corporate liability, including basic concepts from contracts, sales, torts, and criminal law.

801G. FOUNDATIONS OF LAW. 3 (M.J. and LL.M. Only)
This course introduces common law doctrines relevant to corporate liability, including basic concepts from contracts, sales, torts, and criminal law.

Law School Events
December 16, 2017
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
December 16, 2017
11:30 AM - 01:00 PM
January 2, 2018
Law School News
December 11, 2017
The Iowa Taxpayers Association announced Dillon Malone, a third-year student at Drake Law School, as the recipient of the 2017 Linda S. Weindruch Scholarship.
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