LPS 035: Special Topics LPS

Fall 2015-Fall 2016:

LPS 035: Law and Borders of Belonging
Who is fully American? What happens to people who are not fully American? Often, law has provided the vocabulary for asking these questions, and defined the consequences for the answers. This course focuses on times and places when law has sometimes been a force for injustice in American history. We will pay particular attention to discrimination against people due to their gender, disability status, sexuality, and race. We will also discuss the ways law is both informed by and helps create ideas within American culture more broadly.

Spring 2015:

LPS 035: Law and Order
The production of order is one of the primary functions attributed to law. Today, criminal law and the institutions of criminal justice are accorded a privileged place in the performance of law’s ordering function. This course provides an introduction to the contexts in which crime, criminal law and criminal justice operate. The focus will be on the United States, but attention will likewise be given to contemporary efforts to extend the criminal justice paradigm into the international context. Proceeding in this way, this course will examine the strengths and limitations of the conventional criminal justice paradigm and develop a broader appreciation of the role played by crime and criminal justice in law’s performance of its ordering function.

LPS 035: Introduction to Human Rights
This course provides an overview and introduction to human rights, and more specifically, to international human rights law. The class will examine the history, development, and operation of human rights treaties and the mechanisms available to enforce these agreements. The course will explore regional and international interpretations of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights. Particular emphasis will be placed on assessing which, if any, rights are universal.

Fall 2013 and Spring 2014:

LPS 035: Global Legal Issues
This course introduces legal issues in world politics, including in the areas of international cooperation and global/regional governance, global security, international human rights law, development and environment. Topics include: global governance, nuclear nonproliferation and deterrence, rights of refugees, international environmental law and global development. Students will examine international legal instruments and states' compliance.

ArtSci News
October 20, 2016
The Comparison Project will present the third event in its 2016–2017 series on death and dying. A community interfaith dialogue on Oct. 27 will feature representatives of three different refugee religions in Des Moines.