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Teacher Education Learning Outcomes and Assessment Results

Teacher Education Conceptual Framework

A Conceptual Framework provides the scaffolding for any educational program/institution as decisions are made about revision and renewal. These are the principles that drive the data definitions, the performance measurement, and analysis for initial certification in the Drake School of Education. Both undergraduate and graduate programs in teacher education are grounded in a Professional Relationship Model; that is, the professional relationships necessary to meet and exceed InTASC standards, Iowa Teaching Standards, and other professional standards as identified by the program.

At the heart of the Drake SOE conceptual framework are professional relationships that the teacher educator strives to develop.

  1. Professional Relationships with learning partners --students, peers, administrators, parents, and community, measured in InTASC Standards 1, 2, 3, 10
  2. Professional Relationships with the content through knowledge and methodology, measured in InTASC Standards 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
  3. Professional Relationships with the profession and self, measured in InTASC Standard 9

Overlying these relationships are Professional Teaching Dispositions identifying the Drake SOE teacher educator as a Learning Leader, a Student Advocate, and a Reflective Practitioner.

The Professional Relationships Model that serves as the conceptual framework for the Teaching and Learning Department in the Drake School of Education both correlates with and complements the mission of the Drake University as well as the mission of the Drake School of Education.

InTASC Standards – Assessment Plan for Knowledge and Skills: Drake University School of Education

Teaching Candidates’ Knowledge and Skill in the Drake University School of Education are assessed against the revised InTASC Standards (Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium) by completing an ePortfolio at the end of the program and assigning the standards to course and level appropriate to the candidates’ place in the program as seen in the chart below. The levels are defined as follows:

  • B=Students will have met Beginning Teacher Licensure Candidate status by the end of their pre-professional coursework.
  • D=Students will have met Developing Teacher Licensure Candidate status by the end of their methods coursework, before entering student teaching.
  • P=Students will have met Proficient Teacher Licensure Candidate status by the end of their student teaching, before graduation and/or recommendation for teacher licensure.
  • A=Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate Accomplished performance during the student teaching semester

(Note: Students meet InTASC Standard 4 at the beginning level by obtaining a minimum of 2.5 GPA in their content area classes.)

InTASC Standards by Course and Level 

InTASC Standards Defined

The Learner and Learning

  • INTASC-2011.1 = Learner Development: The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  • INTASC-2011.2 = Learning Differences: The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  • INTASC-2011.3 = Learning Environments: The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self motivation.

Content Knowledge

  • INTASC-2011.4 = Content Knowledge: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.
  • INTASC-2011.5 = Application of Content: The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

Instructional Practice

  • INTASC-2011.6 = Assessment: The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making.
  • INTASC-2011.7 = Planning for Instruction: The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.
  • INTASC-2011.8 = Instructional Strategies: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.

Professional Responsibility

  • INTASC-2011.9 = Professional Learning and Ethical Practice: The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.
  • INTASC-2011.10 = Leadership and Collaboration: The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

Teaching Dispositions

The Drake School of Education recognizes teaching dispositions are indicated by behaviors that illustrate the ethical mandate of teaching: the commitment and the will to facilitate student learning for each student. We believe professional teaching dispositions can be learned and nurtured through academic and social experiences as well as reflective opportunities about practice. This perspective is affirmed by Benninga et al. (2008) as they assert, "The moral nature of teaching cannot be neatly folded into an articulation of the knowledge and skills essential for teaching, but neither can they be articulated separately from the requirements of effective teaching practice" (p.4). In the Drake University School of Education, we have adopted the following three themes to advance and assess the professional dispositions of our teacher education candidates: Learning Leader, Student Advocate, Reflective Practitioner.

Within the Drake School of Education, we have chosen to use a development approach to foster the ethical mandate of teaching in our teaching candidates by creating levels of dispositional outcomes that will be progressively assessed by university faculty, practicing teachers, and students themselves at the gates within the Teacher Education Program. 

  • Acceptance to Teacher Education
  • Acceptance to Student Teaching
  • Final Evaluation of Student Teaching

Students are asked to self-assess at the Pre-Professional, Professional Course, and Professional Semester levels. Mentor teachers in the schools contribute assessment of the dispositional behaviors below as part of practicum evaluations from practicum experiences throughout the program. Faculty members offer their assessment at each of the three gates. This triangulation of data serves as internal and external program checks while allowing for professional and personal social growth for pre-service teaching candidates. Assessment levels are outlined below.

Disposition 1 Criteria and Assessment Points: Learning Leader
A learning leader who models honesty, integrity, professional ethics, and empowers each student to succeed. Beginning: (Foundations Course: Student Self-Assessment; Admission to the Teacher Education Program: Faculty; Practicum Evaluations: Mentor Teachers)
  1. Completes assignments, tasks and requirements on time
  2. Arrives in class and to appointments on time
  3. Uses references and resources ethically
  4. Acts respectfully

Developing: (Methods Courses: Student Self-Assessment; Admission to Student Teaching: Faculty; Methods Practicum Evaluations: Mentor Teachers)

  1. Demonstrates an open mind and willingness to try new things
  2. Develops lesson plans that accommodate different ways of learning
  3. Plans learning activities and assessment to support academic, social, emotional, and physical growth of students
  4. Takes initiative to work with students and collaborate with educators

Proficient: (Student Teaching Exit Survey: Student Self-Assessment; Final Evaluation for Student Teaching: University Supervisors; Final Evaluation for Student Teaching: Mentor Teachers)

  1. Sets professional goals
  2. Demonstrates confidence and self-direction in pursuing solutions to problems or questions
  3. Communicates high expectations to all students

Advanced: (Goals for Practicing Teachers)

  1. Uses the needs and interests of students to approach curricular and strategic decisions
  2. Extends learning beyond classroom walls
Disposition 2 Criteria and Assessment Points: Student Advocate
A student advocate who provides a positive, safe, secure learning environment, as well as values and sustains positive and professional relationships with students and colleagues. Beginning: (Foundations Course: Student Self-Assessment; Admission to the Teacher Education Program: Faculty; Practicum Evaluations: Mentor Teachers)
  1. Uses professional language appropriate in discussions and writing
  2. Maintains a positive attitude toward students, peers, educational stakeholders

Developing: (Methods Courses: Student Self-Assessment; Admission to Student Teaching: Faculty; Methods Practicum Evaluations: Mentor Teachers)

  1. Maintains professional boundaries with students and educational stakeholders
  2. Facilitates a learning environment to support the safety, dignity, and equity of students

Proficient: (Student Teaching Exit Survey: Student Self-Assessment; Final Evaluation for Student Teaching: University Supervisors; Final Evaluation for Student Teaching: Mentor Teachers)

  1. Develops a teaching philosophy that respects all learners
  2. Demonstrates pedagogical flexibility by adapting, adjusting and modifying practices to meet the needs of students

Advanced: (Practicing Teacher Goals)

  1. Accepts professional responsibility for student learning outcomes
  2. Advocates on the part of students and/or educational stakeholders (IEP meetings, parent-teacher conferences, etc.)
Disposition 3 Criteria and Assessment Points: Reflective Practitioner
A reflective practitioner who engages in continuous self-assessment of professional strengths, by actively seeking feedback from supervisors, mentor teachers, and peers to improve teaching. Beginning: (Foundations Course: Student Self-Assessment; Admission to the Teacher Education Program: Faculty; Practicum Evaluations: Mentor Teachers)
  1. Follows established policies and procedures
  2. Expresses a positive view of self

Developing: (Methods Courses: Student Self-Assessment; Admission to Student Teaching: Faculty; Methods Practicum Evaluations: Mentor Teachers)

  1. Expresses a commitment to teaching and learning
  2. Participates in thoughtful, reflective conversations with students, peers and educators
  3. Incorporates feedback into products and performance

Proficient: (Student Teaching Exit Survey: Student Self-Assessment; Final Evaluation for Student Teaching: University Supervisors; Final Evaluation for Student Teaching: Mentor Teachers)

  1. Sets and achieves professional goals
  2. Articulates high expectations for professional performance
  3. Incorporates feedback from supervisors, mentor teachers, and peers into revisions of products or performances

Advanced: (Practicing Teacher Goals)

  1. Engages in self-assessment as part of ongoing professional growth
  2. Involves and works with others in planning, problem solving, and learning.

Benninga, J., Diez, M. Dottin, E., Feiman-Nemser, S, Murrell, P, & Sockett, H. (2008). Using knowledge and skills to enhance moral sensibilities. Paper presented at the American Association of College for Teacher Education Conference, New Orleans, Feb. 7-9, 2008.

Assessment Results for Initial Teacher Education at Drake University

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