Philosophy & Religion

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Tim Knepper

Professor of Philosophy and Department Chair
Director, The Comparison Project
Office Location: 203 Medbury Hall
515-271-2167                                                              Knepper CV

Timothy Knepper is a professor of philosophy at Drake University, where he directs The Comparison Project, a public program in global, comparative religion and local, lived religion. He is the author of books on the future of the philosophy of religion (The Ends of Philosophy of Religion, Palgrave, 2013) and the sixth-century Christian mystic known as Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite (Negating Negation, Wipf & Stock, 2014). He is also the editor of a student-written, photo-narrative about religion in Des Moines (A Spectrum of Faith, Drake Community Press, 2017) and The Comparison Project's lecture and dialogue series on ineffability (Ineffability: An Exercise in Comparative Philosophy of Religion, Springer, 2017). The Comparison Project programming currently includes a biennial lecture and dialogue series, a monthly series of open houses at faith communities, an annual interfaith youth camp, and online guides to the "religions of Des Moines." Tim's current projects include and undergraduate textbook and edited collection in "global-critical" philosophy of religion, an edited collection on The Comparison Project's 2015-17 programming on death and dying, and an essay on Jacques Derrida's and Jean-Luc Marion's interpretations of Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite. 

Born in Pittsburgh, raised in upstate New York, and educated at Boston University (Ph.D., 2005, Boston University), Tim moved to Iowa City in 2002, then to Des Moines in 2005. While desperately missing mountains, Tim is learning to love the expansive horizons of the Midwest.

Art Sci Events
March 29, 2018
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM
A&S News
March 19, 2018
A new exhibition in Cowles Library examines the life and work of Jay N. “Ding” Darling, two-time Pulitzer-prize winning political cartoonist and environmental conservationist.