Courses

Introductory Courses

Advanced Courses

Internships & Independent Studies

Introductory Courses

POLS 001: THE AMERICAN POLITICAL SYSTEM, 3 credit hrs.
A survey of the politics and processes of American government at the national level: the constitutional foundations of American government, national institutions, chiefly the Presidency, Congress and Supreme Court, and the political forces that shape American government, including elections, parties and interest groups. Prereq.: none.

POLS 065: COMPARATIVE POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
This introductory course encourages students to look at politics in other countries from a comparative perspective. Basic topics in the field include the origins of states, political culture, types of political regimes, political institutions, causes of revolution, the roots of democracy and political development. The study of a few select countries and regions helps to illustrate these concepts. Prereq.: none.

POLS 075: WORLD POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
An introductory survey of the field of international relations, covering differing national perspectives on current issues, current trends in the evolution of the international system, sources of conflict, international political economy, and the roles of international law and international organizations. Prereq.: none

POLS 085: CONCEPTS IN POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
Provides a broad-ranging introduction to key concepts in the study and practice of politics, including power, community, obligation, sovereignty, equality, liberty, justice, and democracy. Explores the conceptual roots of political conflict in contemporary public policy debates.

POLS 095: METHODS IN POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
This course provides a broad introduction to the methods used to conduct systematic inquiry into political science. Beginning with research design considerations and literature review, students will address both qualitative and quantitative methodologies used among political science scholars, including case study analysis, comparative methods, elite interviews, empirical analysis, and formal models. Pre-reqs: POLS 001 and POLS 065 and POLS 075.

Advanced Courses

POLS 101: WASHINGTON SEMESTER, 0-15 credit hrs.
Twelve to 15-hour semester course of study through American University in Washington, D.C. Students may pursue a variety of courses of study together with an internship in the Washington area. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 102: WASHINGTON CENTER, 9-12 credit hrs.
Twelve hour semester-long course of study through The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars in Washington, D.C. Students may pursue a variety of courses of study together with an internship in the Washington area. Prereq: POLS 001 and instructor's consent.

POLS 109: SPECIAL TOPICS, 3 credit hrs.
Units of study focusing on special issues, problems, or developments in international relations. Prereq.: POLS 075 or instructor's consent.

POLS 112: WOMEN IN POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the role that women play in American politics, the changes in that role over time, and the obstacles yet confronting women who aspire to political careers. Analysis of selected contemporary issues of special importance to women in politics. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent. May be used as part of Women's Studies Concentration.

POLS 113: THE AMERICAN ELECTORAL PROCESS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the role of elections in the American political system. Focus on voting behavior, the influence of money and campaign strategy. Special attention to the impact of the mass media. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 114: PUBLIC OPINION, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the origins and effects of public opinion. Exploration of the processes of socialization and political learning. Focus on the impact of opinions on the political activity of citizens and on governmental actions. Special attention to public opinion polling. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 115: PRESIDENT NOMINATION PROCESS, 3 credit hrs.
An in-depth study of the presidential campaign process, with special attention to the role of the Iowa Caucuses and the structure, timing and sequence of the nomination process on the way we choose our Presidential candidates. Focus on the role of money, media, voters and candidate strategy. Examination of the impact of the system on the ability of President's to govern. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent. Must take POLS 193 at the same time.

POLS 116: MEDIA AND MODERN POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the impact of the mass media, especially television, on American politics. Exploration of how the organization and broadcast patterns of the media affect political change. Focus on how these patterns affect the public, the president and Congress. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 117: RACE AND AMERICAN POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
Contemporary American national politics has been profoundly influenced by race-related issues including busing, urban problems, and affirmative action. This course will acquaint students with how political scientists analyze the effect of race on American politics. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 119: TOPICS IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
Units of study focusing on special issues, problems, or developments in American government and politics. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 121: THE UNITED NATIONS AND GLOBAL SECURITY, 3 credit hrs.
Students explore the development of the United Nations and the record of UN efforts to promote international peace and security. Students also examine a variety of proposals for UN reform. Prereq.: POLS 075 or instructor's consent.

POLS 122: MODEL UNITED NATIONS, 1 credit hr.
Preparation for participation in one of the regional Model UN events held in the Midwest each year. This course centers around assignments and activities designed to prepare Drake's Model UN team for participation in this event. Students may take the course more than once for credit. Prereq. or coreq.: POLS 121 or instructor's consent.

POLS 123: GRASSROOTS GLOBALISM, 4 credit hrs.
This course examines the role that transnational social movements (TSMs) play in world politics with respect to such issues as human rights, peace, the environment, development, labor and gender. TSMs are political networks of governmental organizations and activists that focus on specific issues and span two or more countries. TSMs seek social change consistent with core principled ideas. As the international role of such networks has grown in recent decades, so has the need for us to understand their origins, practices, impact and potential. Participants in the course will be required to complete 20 hours of service learning outside of regular class hours. Previous completion of POLS 075 is recommended, though not required

POLS 124: REVISITING VIETNAM, 3 credit hrs.
The Vietnam War was perhaps the most controversial international engagement in American history. This course treats Vietnam as a case study in the making of U.S. foreign policy. Our central concern will be to answer the question: What went wrong? We will examine the war through the eyes of various parties to the conflict: American policy-makers, military leaders, common soldiers, anti-war activists, public opinion and the Vietnamese themselves, both allies and adversaries. Previous completion of POLS 075 is recommended, though not required.

POLS 125: POST-CONFLICT JUSTICE, 3 credit hrs.
This course will address national and international efforts to promote justice and to establish the rule of law at the end of violent conflicts between and within nation-states. We will explore a variety of mechanisms for pursuing peacebuilding and post-conflict justice, including trials, war crimes tribunals, truth and reconciliation commissions, and reparations. Prereq.: POLS 075 or instructor's consent.

POLS 126: THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF GLOBALIZATION, 3 credit hrs.
This course will examine the political and economic dimensions of globalization. In particular, we will explore the ways in which globalization is shaped by political actions and institutions and how globalization, in turn, impacts politics within and among countries. Our focus will be on the integration of markets in the areas of trade, finance, labor and information and the impacts of globalization on growth, inequality and the environment. Prerequisites: POLS 075 or 065; Econ 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 127: GLOBAL HEALTH, 3 credit hrs.
This course examines global public health challenges in an era of globalization. Students will explore a variety of threats to national and human security stemming from transnational public health challenges that transcend national borders.

POLS 128: NATIONALISM AND POLITICS IN EASTERN EUROPE, 3 credit hrs.
Analysis of nationalism in its various forms: ethnic, religious, civic and political; and discussion of its influence on the development of new governments in several formerly communist Eastern European nations. Prereq.: POLS 065, 075, or instructor's consent.

POLS 129: TRANSITIONS TO DEMOCRACY, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the theories and practices of two types of political regimes: democracies and dictatorships. Why do so many countries want to become democratic now, and will these new democracies last? Major paper required. Prereq.: POLS 065 or instructor's consent.

POLS 130: STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT, 3 credit hrs.
The structure and functions of the states in the federal union; their relations to the national government; state constitutions; political parties; and the administration of the main state functions. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 133: THE MIDDLE EAST THROUGH FILM, 3 credit hrs.
This class relies on films to study important political and social events in the Middle East region. Some of the movies covered in class examine the political and economic realties, whereas other films focus on societal changes that have had significant implications for the Middle East and beyond. We start with a lecture on the background of the political topics covered in the film; the second and third hours of class are devoted to the screening of the film; and the last hour of class involves class discussion of the film and an analysis of its political meaning and significance. I urge everyone to engage and to think critically about the topics presented and the questions presented during the course.

POLS 134: HISTORY: POLITICS AND SOCIETY OF MODERN EGYPT, 3 credit hrs.
This seminar is an introduction to the history, politics, and culture of Egypt covering roughly the period from 1805 to the present. It will introduce students to some of the major questions, debates, and recurring themes in the study of contemporary Egyptian society in an interdisciplinary and theoretically informed fashion. Some of the topics we will cover include socioeconomic transformations in Egyptian society from 1952 to the present, the nature of Egyptian politics and political participation, the relationship between politics and culture in Egypt, political Islam or Islamist politics, and political economy and recurrent economic crises including the most recent changes in Egypt's political economy in the 1990's (structural adjustment, privatization and the socio-political consequences of these policies), the future of the republic after Mubarak.

POLS 135: ISLAM IN THE 21ST CENTURY, 3 credit hrs.
Since the collapse of the Iron Curtain, Islam has become to some intellectuals, policy-makers, and ordinary citizens a great menace that threatens the West and the Judo- Christian Civilization. The Green Peril in public discourse replaced Communism as the main ideological challenge to Liberalism. Is Islam a genuine threat to the West? What does Islam actually mean to the billion-plus of believers worldwide? What is Islam's relation to modernity? How similar and different is Islam from the other Ibhrahimic Religions?

POLS 136: THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT, 3 credit hrs.
This course focuses on the causes, evolvement, and future prospects of the Arab-Israeli conflict. It provides an in-depth understanding of the Arab-Israeli conflict as it has unfolded over the past century. By examining the roots of this conflict, its key events and crises, as well as the peace process, students will gain a deeper appreciation for the complexities and dynamism of this subject. Pre-requisite: POLS 075.

POLS 137: COMPARATIVE LAW AND COURTS, 3 credit hrs.
There is an emerging agreement that the courts are politically-relevant institutions and that the traditional perception about the limited political significance of the judiciary is valid no longer. This course focuses on understanding the different legal systems in the world today. It seeks to introduce the plethora of courts and laws that increasingly shape our social and political life. It brings together case studies from developed and developing nations, democratic and authoritarian regimes, and common and civil law traditions. Pre-requisite: POLS 065.

POLS 139: COMPARATIVE ASIAN POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
Comparative analysis of the political, economic, and social systems of the countries of Asia, with a particular focus on China, India, Japan, and Indonesia.

POLS 151: THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY, 3 credit hrs.
Analysis of the role of the presidency in the American political system, with special attention to the nature and extent of presidential powers and duties. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 152: CONGRESS AND THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the U.S. Congress in terms of its functions as both a lawmaking institution and a representative institution. Attention to the legislative process, congressional elections, party leadership, and executive-legislative relations. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 153: JUDICIAL POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of the role of the federal judiciary in American government. Topics include the design and structure of the American courts, judicial selection, judicial decision-making, the implementation of judicial decisions, and the interaction between the courts and the political environment. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 155: AMERICAN PUBLIC POLICY, 3 credit hrs.
Critical examination of contemporary public-policy issues in the United States with emphasis on the dynamics of issue development, political culture, basic institutions, processes, and contemporary problems. Special attention to the various models of the policy process. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 156: ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY, 3 credit hrs.
Analysis of the relationship between political and economic forces and environmental control of such problems as the population explosion, air-water pollution, nuclear contamination, urban congestion, and rural deterioration. Prereq.: POLS 001 and/or ENV 035-056, or instructor's consent.

POLS 157: CRIME AND PUNISHMENT IN UNITED STATES, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores topics in the theory and practice of crime and punishment in the contemporary U.S. Topics include the moral foundations of the criminal law, the politicization of crime and punishment, the politics of the criminal process, and the edges of the criminal law, including systems of juvenile and educational justice. Readings are drawn from political science, history, law, economics, sociology, and political philosophy. The goal of the course is to provide students with the information and skills necessary for thoughtful, disciplined, and informed analysis of common assumptions about the nature of the criminal law and criminal justice system in the U.S. Prereq.: POLS 001.

POLS 158: CONSTRUCTING AMERICANS, 3 credit hrs.
An interdisciplinary approach to the politics of membership in the U.S. Topics include: theories of political identity, membership, and community; how American political culture and judicial decisions structure across to U.S. citizenship; how American public policy shapes understandings of the rights and duties of membership; and the future of membership--politicking in the U.S., including contemporary theoretical and policy debates about multiculturalism and diversity, immigration control, and the fate of democratic citizenship in an 'Age of Terror.' Readings are drawn from law, political theory, public policy, and sociology.

POLS 160: MODERN EUROPEAN POLITICAL SYSTEMS, 3 credit hrs.
Comparative analysis of the political structures, cultures and institutions of government in selected Western and Eastern European nations. Examination of the European Community, the sovereignty of EC members, and other issues influencing politics in contemporary Europe. Prereq.: POLS 065 or instructor's consent.

POLS 161: POLITICS IN RUSSIA AND EASTERN EUROPE, 3 credit hrs.
After an overview of the Soviet political system and its breakdown, the course will devote several weeks to contemporary Russian politics, especially since 2000. It will also cover Central and Eastern Europe since 1989, with a special emphasis on current political developments.

POLS 162: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF CHINA, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the Chinese political tradition, revolution, and the People's Republic. Attention given to geographical, historical, social, cultural, and economic foundations of political development and to contemporary issues and problems. Prereq: POLS 065 or instructor's consent.

POLS 163: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF JAPAN, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the political system of Japan with attention to both political tradition and contemporary politics, including analyses of historical and social foundations, political groups and parties, and major issues in domestic and foreign policy. Prereq.: POLS 065 or instructor's consent

POLS 164: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN LATIN AMERICA, 3 credit hrs.
Contemporary analysis of Latin American political systems. Emphasis on political and economic development, democratization, political culture and relations with extra-regional actors. Prereq.: POLS 065 or instructor's consent.

POLS 165: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF DEVELOPING NATIONS, 3 credit hrs.
Comparative analysis of the structures, processes and problems of political systems in developing countries. Particular attention to Africa and the theories of political development. Prereq.: POLS 065 or instructor's consent

POLS 166: COMPARATIVE POLITICAL PARTIES AND INTEREST GROUPS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the role of citizen organizations in Western democracies. Exploration of the role of political parties and interest groups in political processes and their effects on policy outputs. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 167: SUPREME COURTS AND ELECTIONS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the relationship between the judiciary and electoral politics in the United States and other Western Style democracies. Exploration of issues of democratic competition, representation and campaign finance. Special attention to equality and fairness and the empirical study of representative government. Prereq.: POLS 001 or permission of instructor.

POLS 168: POLITICS AND PARLIAMENTS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of similarities and differences among such parliamentary systems as those in Britain, Canada, Australia, and India; exploration of contrasts between parliamentary and presidential forms of government. Prereq.: POLS 065 or instructor's consent.

POLS 169: TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
Units of study focusing on special issues, problems or developments in comparative government and politics. Prereq.: POLS 065 or instructor's consent.

POLS 170: INTERNATIONAL LAW, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of extent to which international law governs interactions among states in contemporary world politics. Exploration of fundamental principles of international law and their possible erosion in recent decades as a result of growing support for new international legal norms such as human rights. Prereq.: POLS 075 or instructor's consent.

POLS 171: POLITICAL INTEGRATION OF EUROPE, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of Europe's various attempts at unification since W.W.II, with special emphasis on both the role of individual member states within the European Union and the role of the EU as an international organization operating within the international community. Prereq.: POLS 065 or POLS 075 or instructor's consent.

POLS 172: INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY, 3 credit hrs.
Exploration of the political dimensions of international economic relations. Topics include international trade and monetary affairs; multi-national corporations; north-south relations; Third World debt; and the foreign economic strategies of various states. Prereq.: POLS 075 or instructor's consent.

POLS 173: HUMAN RIGHTS AND WORLD POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the politics of human rights and the changing nature of sovereignty in the international system. Special attention to major threats to human rights in the contemporary world, and to cultural and political obstacles to international consensus on human rights norms and the appropriate mechanisms for their implementation. Prereq.: POLS 075 or instructor's consent.

POLS 174: POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of political relations in the Middle East and the region's place in international politics. Emphasis is given to historical context, geographic and cultural foundations, types of political regimes, policy orientations of key states, and the region's principal problems and issues. Prereq.: POLS 075 or instructor's consent.

POLS 176: GENDER AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the way considerations of gender challenge traditional approaches to the study of world politics, with special attention to national security, war and peace, human rights and economic development. A large part of the course focuses on how women have been affected by global politics. Prereq.: POLS 075 or instructor's consent. May be used as part of Women's Studies concentration.

POLS 177: MODEL EUROPEAN UNION, 1 credit hr.
Optional laboratory-type course which complements POLS 171; European Integration. This course entails going to The Midwest Model European Union Simulation in Indianapolis for three days in April or to another recognized simulation. Students may take the course more than once for credit. Prereq.: POLS 171 or 160.

POLS 178: US/EAST ASIAN RELATIONS, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of American-East Asian relations in historical and theoretical perspectives. Topics include the open door policy, the Pacific War, the war in Korea, the quagmire in Vietnam, and Japan's economic challenge. Prereq.: POLS 75 or instructor's consent.

POLS 179: AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY, 3 credit hrs.
An analysis of patterns and trends in recent American foreign policy and an examination of the process of foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the president, Congress, the bureaucracy, the military, pressure groups, public opinion and other forces. Prereq: POLS 075 or instructor's consent.

POLS 180: CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY, 3 credit hrs.
Reading of original texts in Western political thought from ancient to early modern times. Special attention to Plato, Aristotle and Machiavelli, with a focus on the contrast between ancient and modern conceptions of politics. Prereq.: POLS 001 and junior standing or instructor's consent.

POLS 181: MODERN POLITICAL THEORY, 3 credit hrs.
Reading of original texts in Western political thought from early modern to contemporary times. Special attention to Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Marx and Mill, with a focus on the contrasts among modern liberalism, conversatism and radicalism. Prereq.: POLS 001 and sophomore standing or instructor's consent.

POLS 182: POLITICAL THEORY OF AMERICAN FOUNDING, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of issues such as constitutionalism, representation, the nature of the union, majority rule and individual rights, and the nature of democracy that received theoretical expression and attention during the American Founding and have political relevance today.

POLS 183: AMERICAN LIBERLISM/CONSERVATISM, 3 credit hrs.
This course is an exploration of the historical roots and contemporary versions of the political theories of American liberalism and the political theories of American conservatism.

POLS 184: MARXISM, 3 credit hrs.
Through an examination of the Marxist understanding of reason, history, and nature, this course explores Marxism as a general social theory. Special attention to Marxism's roots in German Idealism and its distinction between idealist and materialist modes of social explanation.

POLS 185: AMERICAN POLITICAL THEORY, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the main currents and issues of American political thought from the Founding period to the present. Special attention to topics such as constitutionalism, representation, majority rule and individual rights, and liberalism and conservatism. Prereq: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 186: LAW, POLITICS, AND RELIGION, 3 credit hrs.
After some attention to the political behavior of religious groups in America, this course explores the important theoretical question of whether a truly secular society is possible. Specifically, does a political-legal system have the capacity to be neutral regarding religious belief, or does it always and necessarily constitute the establishment of a set of religious beliefs? In what sense and to what extent is it legitimate to appeal to religious doctrine and belief when engaged in political argument? Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 189: TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY, 3 credit hrs.
Units of study focusing on special issues, problems, or developments in political theory. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent.

POLS 190: SEMINAR IN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW, 3 credit hrs.
Through a semester-length focus on a specific topic in American constitutional law, the course explores the nature of law, constitutional theory and interpretation. Students may repeat the course for credit whenever a new topic is offered. Prereq.: POLS 001 and sophomore standing or instructor's consent.

POLS 191: SENIOR SEMINAR IN POLITICS, 3 credit hrs.
Taught by various members of the Department on a rotating basis during the fall semester only, this senior capstone seminar seeks to integrate and reflect on previous coursework in politics. Students will explore the nature of politics through a focus on the theories, concepts, and tools of sophisticated political analysis. Prereq.: prior completion of all Politics subfield requirements, and senior standing or instructor's consent.

POLS 192: SENIOR SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of contending theories in the field of international relations. Compares realists, liberal and globalist approaches to understanding international conflict. Considers relevance of various theoretical arguments to the analysis of contemporary events and trends. Prereq.: POLS 075 and junior or senior standing.

Internships & Independent Studies

POLS 193: INTERNSHIP IN POLITICS, 1-3 credit hrs.
Individualized experience in government/politics accompanied by directed reading, research and reports. Limited admission. Prerequisites: sophomore, junior, or senior standing; 15 hours of POLS classes completed with GPA in all POLS classes of 3.0 or above; instructor and advisor consent.

POLS 194: INTERNSHIP IN POLITICS, 1-3 credit hrs.
Individualized experience in government/politics accompanied by directed reading, research and reports. Limited admission. Prerequisites: sophomore, junior or senior standing; 15 hours of POLS classes completed with GPA in all POLS classes of 3.0 or above; instructor and advisor consent.

POLS 199: INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN POLITICS, 1-3 credit hrs.
Directed individual study in areas related to the student's needs or interests. May be repeated once. Prereq.: Consent of department.

For more information about the work load expectations during internships and independent studies, please see the University's Credit Hour Policy

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