Frequently Asked Questions

 What is Community Engaged Learning?

Community Engaged Learning describes collaboration between institutions of higher education and their larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity (Carnegie Foundation, 2016).

What is the Office of Community Engaged Learning?

The Office of Community Engaged Learning is your one-stop shop for resources related to connecting your students, courses and scholarship to the community. Community Engaged Learning describes collaboration between institutions of higher education and their larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity (Carnegie Foundation, 2016).

What resources can the Office of Community Engaged Learning provide?

What opportunities are available for funding?

Several opportunities are available. Mini-grants are available to support curricular service-learning opportunities, either with a global service-learning component or not; co-curricular opportunities to include student organizations; and Olson Service-Learning Match Grants. 

Who determines if I receive funding?

A sub-committee of the Community Engaged Learning Council will review applications and make determinations of funding. The Community Engaged Learning Council is made up of faculty, staff, and students who are knowledgeable in and practicing Community Engaged Learning.

How is it determined who receives funding?

Criteria include:

How early should I get my request in?

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis by the Community Engaged Learning Council. It is highly encouraged you submit your application 30 days or more in advance to ensure the committee has time to review and ask questions of applicants if necessary before the activity takes place.  No funding will be granted after an activity has occurred. The funding will be granted on a first-come, first-serve basis until all funding has been exhausted for the year

What is Global Service Learning (GSL)?

Drake defines GSL as the intersection of service-learning, immersion in global contexts, and intercultural education. GSL is a form of experiential education that combines academic learning and meeting a relevant community-defined need. Quality service-learning is undertaken intentionally and integrates effective cross-cultural interaction, ongoing reflection, and assessment.

Why is reflection so important in the service-learning process?

Critical reflection is important to the service-learning process for many reasons. It allows participants to examine the root causes of social issues and strategies being used to address them, reflect on whether community voice is included in the process, make connections to the classroom and future careers, and so much more.

What types of projects have been funded in the past?

Examples of projects that have been funded in the past include:

* At this point in time, we are not able to reimburse or provide incentives to students driving to local projects. We encourage the use of the DART transportation system, walking if close by, or carpooling. Please follow all risk management policies: http://www.drake.edu/servicelearning/forfacultystaff/policiesrequestsandriskmanagement/

* We cannot reimburse cash gifts. All gift card recipients must fill out a gift card prize form and submit a W9. 

What if it turns out I don't need the funds I was awarded?

Please let the Office of Community Engaged Learning know as soon as you know you will not be needing the funds. We typically get more requests than we are able to fund so we will be able to allocate those funds to another project. Failure to do so could result in not getting funding in the future. 

Have another question? Email amanda.martin@drake.edu