Skip Sub Menu

2022:On-Campus & Web-Instructed Courses

Instead of heading to your hometowns or off on a vacation over winter break, many students opt to stay right here at Drake. Why? Because during January Term (J-Term), students are given the opportunity to engage in a variety of unique learning experiences, most of which aren’t offered during the regular school year.

For many students, J-Term is an opportunity to take a breather from the traditional structure of the school year, and also to delve into a topic simply because it interests them.

For students who stay on campus during J-Term, there are more than 50 courses from which to choose.


Your J-term, your choice.

On-Campus Courses

ART 071 (CRN 2268): BLACKSMITHING & ART OF UTILITY

ART 071 (CRN 2268): BLACKSMITHING & ART OF UTILITY
Rob Craig
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description:This course will explore the relationships of form to function through the styling of utilitarian objects while maintaining a strong consideration of aesthetic appeal. Through the application of metal working techniques, students will design and create useful objects for a distinct purpose or function. 

ART 072 (CRN 2192): TEXTILE & FIBER ART

ART 072 (CRN 2192): TEXTILE & FIBER ART
Emily Newman
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Artistic Experience & Engaged Citizen

Course Description: Students enrolled in this introductory J-term course will learn traditional and contemporary methods of creating textile and fiber art including resist dye methods, applique', interlocking, digital pattern design, and digital fabric printing. Online Zoom sessions will offer students guided demonstrations, immediate feedback, and live chat discussions. Emphasis will be on creating creating two-dimensional and three-dimensional projects supplemented by discussions and readings of historical and contemporary texts. Additionally, a collaborative project will teach students about the radical history of textiles and the tradition of community engagement in the fiber arts. Students will be required to have reliable internet access and purchase course materials including $40-$80 in custom designed digitally printed fabric. Please note this course is unrelated to fashion and fashion design.

ART 082 (CRN 2269): WORLDBUILDING

ART 082 (CRN 2269): WORLDBUILDING
Benjamin Gardner
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Critical Thinking

Course Description:  This course will encourage students to develop multidisciplinary components of creative projects that involve the practice and careful considerations of Worldbuilding, including and not limited to: table top role-playing games, speculative fiction, audio dramas, and immersive art experiences. Contemporary dialogue of these art forms consists of discussions about inclusion, social justice, and question the status quo of long-accepted paradigms associated with visual art, literature, and audio production. Reading, watching films, viewing art works, and listening to podcasts will provide a platform for critical analysis of popular and fringe culture to guide students as they build their own worlds.

 

ART 112 (CRN 2259): RACE & PERSONHOOD BUILDING EXIB.

ART 112 (CRN 2259): RACE & PERSONHOOD BUILDING EXIB.
Lenore Metrick-Chen
Credits   (0.0 – 4.0)
Lecture
Attribute: Historical Foundations

Course Description: This is a hands-on course, designed to familiarize students with racial history through investigating the idea of personhood and demonstrating that knowledge through the creative act of creating an exhibition. This course will facilitate critical thinking about race through engaging with objects in the creation of an exhibition on race. Working with Julia Franklin in the Anderson Gallery, students will be introduced to artworks and how they create access to controversial or difficult subjects. Students will not passively receive information; their understanding will expand through their creation of an exhibit that will display their developing knowledge and through meeting scholars and experts on the field.

ART 167 (CRN 2119): INTRO TO LETTERPRESS PRINTING

ART 167 (CRN 2119): INTRO TO LETTERPRESS PRINTING
Sarah McCoy
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: This course is an introduction to letterpress and basic graphic design practices focusing on the formal organization of visual elements and the technical process of printing, resulting in creative communication. The course places emphasis on the process and method of various forms of letterpress printing to derive formal solutions to the projects. The course also includes a parallel "hand-craft" component focusing on the development of professional level artistic skills. Course activities will include demonstrations, discussions, readings, practical exercises, and applied projects--a hands-on course that teaches the basics of hand-setting metal and woodtype type. Students will learn how to lock up vintage woodtype, print on antique printing presses and print their own illustrations. The course will take place at Drake University within the graphic design department's letterpress student and at Professor Sarah McCoy's east village studio: The Permanent Collection. The course will explore old and new technologies within the field of printing, the art of fine press printing, and artist's books. No experience is necessary.

BIO 112 L (CRN 1713): AVIAN WINTER ECOLOGY

BIO 112 L (CRN  1713): AVIAN WINTER ECOLOGY
Muir Eaton
Credits 3
Lecture

Course Description: In this J-term course, you will gain extensive experience working with birds in a field setting. You will learn and practice a fundamental took used by ornithologist and wildlife biologist for studying birds: mist-netting and banding of individuals. In addition, you will learn identification of Iowa's winter bird species, working with museum study skins as well as captured live individuals, and you will design and conduct behavioral experiments on birds, exploring their winter physiology and ecological roles. Class time will be outdoors as much as possible. You will become expert at handling and releasing live birds, and the skills developed in this course will well prepare you for advanced field studies and graduate work in Ornithology. This is an on-campus course, and we will be working at natural areas nearby Drake.

Prerequisites: BIO 001, 012, 013, or 018 or see instructor for approval.

BIO 122-122L (CRN 2267/2264): FIELD MAMMALOGY LECTURE & LAB

BIO 122-122L  (CRN 2267/2264): FIELD MAMMALOGY LECTURE & LAB
Keith Summerville
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute:

Course Description: The goal of this course is to introduce students to the biology of the class Mammalia. The first portion of the course examines the diagnostic characteristics of mammals, how they evolved and their phylogenic relationships. Upon completing this subsection of the course, students will be able to compare and contract major mammal clades based on their common ancestry and shared derived characters.  The middle portion of the course is a survey of the living mammalian orders: their diagnostic features, life history characteristics and physiological and behavioral specializations.  My emphasis here will be field identification skills for mammals in the United States.  The final subsection of the course will emphasize mammalian ecology, and students will design a small field study to explore mammalian behavior, habitat selection, diversity, or physiological ecology.  Upon completion of this J-Term experience, students will be prepared for advanced graduate study in Mammalogy or for careers as mammalian ecologists.

BIO 145 (CRN 2187): SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION

BIO 145 (CRN 2187): SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION
Jerry Honts
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute:

Course Description: This course will provide practical experience in the use of open-source software to graphically represent scientific data as images or 3D models, with the goal of gaining insight into the meaning of the data.  It will emphasize the use of best practices in creating representations that clearly and effective communicate scientific findings. The course will focus on using Python and R software packages to generate professional images, video, or 3D models from datasets. Although the course will focus on using biological data, the methods used can be applied to any scientific discipline.

BUS 191 (CRN 1607): INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS

BUS 191 (CRN 1607): INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS
Mary Edrington
Credits 1.000-3.000
Attribute:

Course Description: Experiential learning credit for substantive workplace experiences. Prereq.: Sophomore standing; major in the College of Business and Public Administration; minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 and permission of the Internship Coordinator

Enrollment in not more than 18 semester hours credit (including the internship) in any fall or spring semester in which internship credit is earned and 12 hours (including the internship) in the summer sessions. May be repeated, however, no more than 6 credit hours of internship work will count towards meeting graduation requirements.

CHEM 006/007 (CRN 2199/2200) - CHEM FOR INFORMED CITIZEN LECTURE & LAB

CHEM 006/007 (CRN 2199/2200)- CHEM FOR INFORMED CITIZEN LECTURE & LAB
Gholam Mirafzal,  Genelle Shutt
Credits 3/1
Lecture/Lab
Attribute: Life Science, Physical Science

Course Description: A survey of some principles of chemistry, stressing concepts and qualitative understanding rather than problem solving or technical skills. Application of a core of concepts to chemical aspects of current social political or economic situations.

An optional laboratory experience to accompany CHEM 6. Experiments illustrate how fundamental and practical chemical information is obtained. Properties of substances are observed and experiments are performed to foster appreciation of the impact of chemistry in a technological society.

Prereq.: Concurrent enrollment of previous credit in CHEM 6.

CS 083 (CRN 2258): ETHICAL/SOCIAL COMPUTING

CS 083 (CRN 2258): ETHICAL/SOCIAL COMPUTING
Christopher Porter
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Int Study Humanities/Sciences, Values and Ethics

Course Description: This course increases understanding of issues related to ethics, professional conduct and social responsibility as they arise in Computer Science and applications of Information Technology. Additionally, the course serves to develop 1) the ability to think clearly; 2) habits of professional responsibility and behavior; and 3) effective writing and presentation skills. Students are exposed to the history of the discipline from a social point of view, and to various frameworks from which ethical and professional decisions must be made within the discipline.

CS 190 (CRN 2271): CASE STUDIES IN DATA ANALYTICS

CS 190 (CRN 2271): CASE STUDIES IN DATA ANALYTICS
Eric Manley
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute:

Course Description: In this course, students will apply descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive data analysis methods learned in previous courses to new cases. Students will learn to effectively manage long-term data analysis projects within diverse teams through a complete data analytics project lifecycle and compellingly communicate outcomes through writing and oral presentations which include appropriate use of data visualizations. Credits: 3. Pre-requisites: (1) CS 066, (2) STAT/MATH 130 or ACTS/MATH 131, and (3) two of STAT 170, STAT 172, CS 167, CS 178.

ECON 131 (CRN 2063): CHINA'S ECONOMY

ECON 131 (CRN 2063): CHINA'S ECONOMY
Bo Wang
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Historical Foundations

Course Description: China's economy has grown more rapidly than any other major economy in recent years. This course examines causes and consequences of this growth, including trends, challenges, policy responses and current developments. Similarities and differences between U.S. and Chinese economic institutions will be examined in detail.

Prereq.: ECON 010 or ECON 001, and MATH 020.

ENG 040 (CRN 2280): TOPICS IN LITERARY HISTORY: THE PRINT REVOLUTION

ENG 040 (CRN 2280): TOPICS IN LITERARY HISTORY: THE PRINT REVOLUTION
Prof. Gabriel Ford
Credits 3
Lecture
Modality: On Campus

Course Description: The emergence of moveable-type relief printing in Europe revolutionized the production and circulation of texts in ways that permanently altered the way information moves and persists. In this course, we will examine the long reach of print technologies and printed books into our lives. We will situate the rise of print in Europe in a global context and with respect to our current digital information revolution. Most distinctly, we will use the tools, technologies, and techniques of letterpress relief printing to learn about the printing revolution as a hands-on practice; these hands-on projects with letterpress printing will occupy a significant portion of the instructional time and constitute a major component of the course grade. 

ENG 118 (CRN-2174): READING AND CREATING COMICS

ENG 118 (CRN-2174): READING AND CREATING COMICS
Professor Amy Letter
Credits 3
Lecture
Attributes: Written Communication

Course Description: This course will allow students to explore comics as literature, and to create comics of their own. Readings will include full-length graphic narratives and shorter comics designed both for print and electronic media, as well as essays and theoretical readings that consider comics as both visual and literary art. Students in this course will create approximately 8 pages of comics, write several responses and essays that engage with readings and reflect on individual practice, and will engage in frequent drawing and writing exercises. The course will culminate in a polished comic of at least five pages. Course requires no prior experience in drawing. No prerequisite.

ENG 136 (CRN-2202): ADOLESCENCE IN AMERICAN FILM

ENG 136 (CRN-2202): ADOLESCENCE IN AMERICAN FILM
Professor Beth Younger
Credits 3
Lecture
Attributes: Women Studies

Course Description: This course explores depictions of “problematic” adolescence in contemporary American fiction and film. We read novels, essays, and view films with an eye toward understanding how western culture has constructed the adolescent identity/experience. This course will expect students to engage in critical thinking, close reading and textual analysis to analyze, interpret, and interrogate texts. Additionally, we will consider the public, familial, and educational aspects of adolescence and how these texts complicate our idea of what it means to be a teenager.

Assignments include daily writing, essays, reading quizzes, small group discussion, and a final. Class will be primarily large group discussion. Texts may include but are not limited to: Columbine, Ghost World, and Black Hole. Films include Welcome to the Dollhouse, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Where the Boys Are, River’s Edge, and Elephant.

HIST 105(CRN 2172):MIDWESTERN HISTORY

HIST 105(CRN 2172):MIDWESTERN HISTORY
Amahia Mallea
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Historical Foundations

Course Description: For J-Term 2022, assuming we can be in person, this course will take field trips in Des Moines and will engage in archival research. The plains are defined by the short- and tallgrass prairie from Indiana to the Rockies, and from central Canadian provinces to Texas. Historically the plains have been the land of Native nations, were claimed by several European nations, became Indian Territory and then the American West, and now are considered the Midwest. Ecologically, this region has undergone vast changes—from prairie to a global breadbasket—which reflect the social and economic changes that have occurred with the re-peopling of the plains, from Cahokia to Chicago. Rather than assume a story of tragedy or triumph, we will discuss the complexity of historical change, how historians have interpreted this region, and discover for ourselves how the past illuminates the present. This class counts for the Historical Foundations AOI.

HSCI 148 (CRN 2053): EXERCISE TEST AND PRESCRIPTION

HSCI 148 (CRN 2053): EXERCISE TEST AND PRESCRIPTION
Kim Huey
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Life Sciences

Course Description: The purpose of this course it to provide the opportunity to utilize state of the art laboratory equipment and techniques to learn the concepts of physiological fitness testing and exercise prescription. Exercise prescription and the implementation of conditioning programs will include individuals of differing ages, fitness levels, and health status. Emphasis is on the five major health-related components of physical fitness: [1] cardiorespiratory fitness, [2] muscular strength, [3] muscular endurance, [4] flexibility, and [5] body composition. The course will include hands-on exercise testing using class members, interpretation of test results, and effective design of exercise programs [i.e. prescriptions].

IS 172 (CRN 2109): EXPLORING THE SILICON PRAIRIE

IS 172 (CRN 2109): EXPLORING THE SILICON PRAIRIE
Alanah Mitchell
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Historical Foundations

Course Description: This class is designed for students with an interest in technology and its various applications not only in the business realm, but also in society at large. This course will explore the history of technology and focus on how these powerful systems have fundamentally reshaped modern organizations along with our society. Particular emphasis will be placed on the "Silicon Prairie" we live in, as well as the global world. Topics of study will range from the technologies, methods, and practices of developing new innovations to how this knowledge and these skills are applied to re-engineer business processes.

JMC 58 (CRN 1717): INTRO TO VISUAL COM (Non-JMC)

JMC 58 (CRN 1717): INTRO TO VISUAL COM (Non-JMC)
Lee Jolliffe
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: Survey of visual communications, including basic page/screen design, type and typography, color, illustrations, and concepts. Each topic is approached both analytically and aesthetically. Designed for non-journalism majors only. Laptop required (minimum: i3 processor, 4 gigs of ram, 200 gigs of free storage space, Wireless N.) subscription to the Creative Suite.

JMC 85 (CRN 1583): PUBLIC RELATIONS PRINCIPLES

JMC 85 (CRN 1583): PUBLIC RELATIONS PRINCIPLES
Kelly Bruhn
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Community Engaged Learning and Engaged Citizen

For the first two weeks of registration, this course will be open only to students who have certain declared majors, minors, or concentrations. For a list of those majors, minors, and concentrations, visit the registration page.

Course Description: This course explores the role of public relations in today's organizations. Students will develop an appreciation for and understanding of the critical thinking, research, planning and communication skills necessary for the effective practice of public relations. Students will acquire a solid foundation in the basic theories and concepts of communication, persuasion, motivation and learning which are integral parts in the success of public relations and in engaging people. Prereq.: Sophomore standing

JMC 99 (CRN 1629): SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIES

JMC 99 (CRN 1629): SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIES
Christopher Snider
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Information Literacy

Course Description: This class explores the role of social media in our everyday lives, from the way we communicate with our friends to the way businesses communicate with customers. Students will create and execute a personal social media strategy as well as creating social media strategies for businesses and organizations.

JMC 99 (CRN 1841): THE MUSIC BUSINESS

JMC 99 (CRN 1841): THE MUSIC BUSINESS
Thomas Kutz
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute:

Course Description: "A Peek Behind the Curtain of the Music Business" is an interdisciplinary study of the music industry, including music publishing, music promotion, music business ethics, emerging music business technologies, copyright law, and other subjects directly pertinent to understanding today's music industry landscape. The course will include a practical look at the industry through the work of Station 1 Records, a local record label. The course includes daily guest speakers both in class and via video conference with executives from the leading companies in the music business like Sony Music, Warner Music Group, Kobalt Music Publishing , and others.

Station 1 Records is a non-profit artist entrepreneurship program dedicated to the development and patronage of independent music artists. Station 1 provides a platform for artists and opportunities for students interested in working in the business to do hands-on work in recording, distribution, public relations, marketing, promotion, and tour support.

LEAD 199 (CRN 2281) - LEADERSHIP IN THE WIZARDING WORLD

LEAD 199 (CRN 2281) - LEADERSHIP IN THE WIZARDING WORLD
Jennifer Tran-Johnson
Credits 3
Lecture

Course Description: Whether seeking the golden snitch or aspiring to become minister of magic, a strong moral and ethical foundation is crucial for leadership success. Through the lens of the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, students will use their personal morals, attitudes, and beliefs to develop a foundation for reflective decision-making. This class will explore the concepts of moral and ethical reasoning, identity development, servant leadership, and transformational leadership. Students in this course must have already read the Harry Potter book series and have a comprehensive understanding of the stories, characters, and wizarding world. There is no prerequisite for this course, however, completion of LEAD 001 or the Adams Leadership Academy is encouraged.

LIBR 046 (CRN 2218) INFORMATION LITERACY

LIBR 046 (CRN 2218) INFORMATION LITERACY
Gillian Gremmels & Teri Koch
Credits 2
Lecture
Attribute:  Information Literacy

Course Description: Students will use appropriate sources, including library and internet resources, to process and evaluate information. Students will gain a critical understanding of the social, economic, and ethical issues encountered in the world of networked information, develop the ability to assess the quality of information, and learn appropriate ways to reference information sources.

LIBR 052 (CRN 1961): INTRODUCTION TO ARCHIVES

LIBR 052 (CRN 1961): INTRODUCTION TO ARCHIVES
Hope Bibens
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Information Literacy

Course Description: This course serves as an experiential introduction to the responsibilities of archivists and records managers by providing an overview of the principles upon which archival theory is based and the key practices of archival work:  appraisal, acquisition, accession, processing, arrangement, description, and use.  Through practical and hands-on assignments involving the collections in the Drake University Archives & Special Collections, readings, and discussions, the course will establish a basic understanding of the archival profession.

LIBR 072 (CRN 1539): WHAT’S UP DOC? AN INFORMATION LITERACY EXPLORATION OF DOCUMENTARY FILMS

LIBR 072 (CRN 1539): WHAT’S UP DOC? AN INFORMATION LITERACY EXPLORATION OF DOCUMENTARY FILMS
Carrie Dunham-LaGree
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Information Literacy

Course description: This course will use documentary films to explore information literacy concepts and impart an understanding of information resources. Students will explore current trends in documentaries by watching a wide variety of documentaries. Through reading and exploration, students will learn the skills needed to search many types of information resources. We will explore the notion of documentaries as texts that are both the result of research and the starting point for more research.

LIBR 085 (CRN 2270): SCIENCE AND DEMOCRACY: EMPOWER, COLLABORATE & ADVANCE

LIBR 085 (CRN 2270): SCIENCE AND DEMOCRACY: EMPOWER, COLLABORATE & ADVANCE
Dan Chibnall
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Information Literacy & Engaged Citizen

Course Description: Science as a way of knowing and democracy as a form of government have both been around for thousands of years. However, they have only come to global prominence in the last 300-500 years, changing our planet and advancing society forward at a rapid pace. This course examines those historical advancements as well as the relationships between the two, which include experimentation, collaboration, testing of ideas, and the pursuit of data, information, and evidence. As our society becomes more reliant on science and technology, we must examine how governments play a role in the scientific process, protection of nature, and ensuring the health and safety of citizens. The course will also focus on how both concepts are individually and collectively empowering, how they teach values such as accountability, openness, respect for evidence, and doubt, how they are pragmatic, and how they both seek universal truths about our world and humanity.

LIBR 99 (CRN 1961): COPYRIGHT ISSUES IN THE U.S.

LIBR 99 (CRN 1961): COPYRIGHT ISSUES IN THE U.S.
Marcia Keyser
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Engaged Citizen

Course Description: Whether you are writing a song for performance, taking notes in class, or posting an event on Facebook, do you have copyright protection for what you do? If you share someone else's story, can he or she claim infringement? What is copyright, anyway? Take this Engaged Citizen class for an overview of copyright law and the many ways it affects our lives in the United States.

LIBR 101 (CRN 1962): REFLECTIONS ON VIDEO GAMING

LIBR 101 (CRN 1962): REFLECTIONS ON VIDEO GAMING
Cameron Tuai
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Engaged Citizen

Course Description: The J-Term class will explore the relationship between video games, gamers and their communities. Starting with the question, "what is a game" student will develop foundational knowledge of video gaming concepts such as aesthetics, narrative, rules and design. From these basic elements, students will then explore the ideals of community as the interaction between the social values "coded" into a video game and game play as a means to communicate membership within that community. In particular, students will have an opportunity to critically reflect how video games and norms or game play shape community ideas of race, gender and sexual identity.

MGMT 120 (CRN 1769): MANAGEMENT OF OPERATIONS

MGMT 120 (CRN 1769): MANAGEMENT OF OPERATIONS
Bradley Meyer
Credits 3
Lecture

Course Description: A study of the operations function of organizations, focusing on providing services and producing goods efficiently and effectively. Students learn how to analyze, measure, and improve work methods; make capacity decisions; manage waiting lines; and control the flow of materials along the supply chain. The course also discusses ethics and sustainabilty; monitoring and improving quality, allocating scarce resources and managing projects.

Prereq.: MATH 020 or MATH 028; IS 044; one of STAT 072, ACTS/MATH 131 or STAT 170; and sophomore standing. 

MUS 160 (CRN 2031): ACTING THROUGH ARIAS

MUS 160 (CRN 2031): ACTING THROUGH ARIAS
Christine Blanner
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute:

Course Description: Specialized study and/or discussion of selected topics in music. The course may focus on important historical, theoretical, educational, or performance issues, among others.

MUS 160 (CRN 2183): SPECIAL TOPICS: MUSIC THROUGH PLAY

MUS 160 (CRN 2183): SPECIAL TOPICS: MUSIC THROUGH PLAY
Ellie Wolfe
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: This course builds students’ understanding of music through an exploration of children’s musical play. Students will develop an understanding of the musical and social characteristics of children’s musical play through exploring, engaging in, and analyzing. The primary goal of this course is to deepen students' comfort and skill in engaging in creative music-making and analysis.

PHAR 117(CRN 2211): EVOLVING HEALTH CARE PARADIGMS

PHAR 117(CRN 2211): EVOLVING HEALTH CARE PARADIGMS
Erik Maki
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Critical Thinking, Pharmacy Prof. Elective

Course description: With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act [Obamacare], health care in the United States is in a state of rapid transformation. This course will review the history and changing paradigms of health care in the United States with specific focus on the Affordable Care Act and innovative technology. Students will develop their understanding of health care financing including pricing and payment systems and the challenges/opportunities created by the system. This course will use a blended format that will incorporate both traditional classroom activities as well as synchronous and asynchronous online learning. This course will emphasize collaborative learning both inside and outside the classroom. Students will be expected to be an active participant in class, complete both individual and group assignments, peer evaluations, and a final reflection paper.

PHAR 118 (CRN 2097): LGBTQ HEALTH: ISSUES

PHAR 118 (CRN 2097): LGBTQ HEALTH: ISSUES
Anisa Hansen
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: Pharmacy Prof. Elective

Course description: This class will focus on understanding healthcare issues affecting the LGBTQ population. Learners will examine topics such as health disparities, advocacy, effective communication, as well as mental and physical health concerns for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities. For a significant portion of this course, students will actively engage with local community partners on projects related to LGBTQ health care. This course will include a variety of learning methods: lecture, small group discussion, group presentations, and service-learning.

POLS 128 (CRN 2237): SIMULATING CRISIS DECISION-MAKING in U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

POLS 128 (CRN 2237): SIMULATING CRISIS DECISION-MAKING in U.S. FOREIGN POLICY
David Skidmore
Credits 3
Lecture
Attribute: N/A

Course Description: This course will examine how U.S. presidents and their foreign policy advisers make decisions under crisis conditions. In addition to examining relevant theoretical and historical literatures, students will engage in several role-playing exercises that simulate the deliberations of the U.S. National Security Council as it develops recommendations for responding to crisis scenarios grounded in real-world cases. Students will gain a deep understanding of how the policy-making process is shaped by the special conditions that typically accompany crises, including high stakes, time urgency, incomplete information, competing goals and high levels of uncertainty. Graded assignments will include an in-class essay exam, briefing papers, reflection papers and simulation performance.

PSY 076 (CRN 2028): ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 076 (CRN 2028): ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
Dr. Greg Lengel
Credits 3
Lecture

Course description: This course exposes students to some general clinical perspectives about human behavior and psychological problems.  Several major theoretical approaches to personality, abnormal behavior, assessment, and treatment are discussed in the context of psychological disorders such as substance abuse, depression, schizophrenia and family violence.

SCSA/SCSS 153 (CRN-1848/1849): DOCUMENTARY VIDEO CHALLENGE

SCSA/SCSS 153 (CRN-1848/1849): DOCUMENTARY VIDEO CHALLENGE
Professor Sandra Patton-Imani
Credits 3
Lecture
Attributes: Anthropology Methods, Community Engaged Learning, Soc Research Design, and Sociology Methods

Course description: This interdisciplinary course will serve as an introduction to critical digital storytelling for social justice. Students will be introduced to the methods associated with digital storytelling, anthropological and sociological tools for critical social and cultural analysis, and video editing techniques. We will synthesize these methods with narrative analysis and writing to critique contemporary issues of injustice. During the three-week J-term course students will write, research, and create a short digital story focused on a contemporary social issue that will be put online for public education and engagement.

SCS: Research design course and CEL course. This course is cross-listed with SCSS 153.

SCSS 078 (CRN-2257): SOCIOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD

SCSS 078 (CRN-2257): SOCIOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD
Professor Laurie Linhart
Credits 3
Lecture
Attributes: Community Engaged Learning and Service Learning

Course description: The class includes discussion and an intensive service-learning component. Students will meet in class for six hours per week (M W F 9:30 - 11:30 am), engage in asynchronous web blend activities one- and one-half hours per week, and participate in service learning five hours per week from 4-5 pm each weekday.  Students need reliable transportation to Moulton Elementary (9th & College in Des Moines). The sociology of childhood presents two insights: childhood is a lived experience and a structural form. As a lived experience, children actively create meaning and engage in social processes that make them a part of society from birth. Children play, learn, question, suffer, challenge, and create. They are not just "under development" or "being socialized," but active in contributing to their own childhoods and to society

Web-Instructed Courses

ACCT 41 (CRN 1766): INTRO TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

ACCT 41 (CRN 1766): INTRO TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
Kelley Ellis
Credits 3
Web Instructed
Attribute: Critical Thinking

Course Description: The elements of the financial statements, accounting for deferrals, the double-entry accounting system, internal control and cash, receivables and payables, inventory, operational assets, long-term debt, equity transactions, income measurement, and comprehensive treatment of the balance sheet, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Financial statement analysis will be integrated throughout the course. Prereq.: None.

ACCT 42 (CRN 2022): INTRO TO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

ACCT 42 (CRN 2022): INTRO TO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
Brian Sweeney
Credits 3
Web Instructed

Course Description: Explaining manufacturing and nonmanufacturing costs and how they are reported in the financial statements, computing the cost of providing a service or manufacturing a product, determining cost behavior as activity levels change, accumulating and presenting relevant data for decision-making, profit planning and budgeting, capital expenditure decisions and financial statement analysis. Prereq.: ACCT 041.

BLAW 60 (CRN 1693): BUSINESS LAW I

BLAW 60 (CRN 1693): BUSINESS LAW I
Stephen Garza
Credits 3
Web-Instructed
Attribute: Critical Thinking and LPS Law Course and Values and Ethics

Course Description: This course discusses the basic precepts of our legal system. These precepts are then applied in the examination of the legal principles that affect business in the areas of contracts, torts and product liability. The course also addresses relevant ethical issues.

Prereq.: Sophomore standing.

BLAW 190 (CRN 2277): INTERPRETING WRITTEN CONTRACTS

BLAW 190 (CRN 2277): INTERPRETING WRITTEN CONTRACTS
Royce Fichtner
Credits 3
Web-Instructed

Course Description: This course will focus on the practical application of the principles of contract law in formal written contracts.  Students will study the most common contract provisions and learn how each impacts the rights and responsibilies of the parties to a contract.  Students will learn a systematic process to analyze and interpret written contracts and get the opportunity to do so by reading various types of contracts.

 

EDUC 191/EDUC 291 (CRN 1903/1904): INTRO TO GIFTED EDUCATION

EDUC 191/EDUC 291 (CRN 1903/1904): INTRO TO GIFTED EDUCATION
Ashley Delaney
Credits 3
Web-Instructed
Attribute: Drake Online Undergrad Program

Course Description: This comprehensive introduction to gifted education combines both theory and practice. In addition to developing an understanding of the history of gifted education and the characteristics, identification, special programs, and related law, participants will learn about instructional models, programming options, assessments, and evaluation. Practical components such as recources, beginning a program, and special programs available, as well as parent education will be addressed.

EDUC 193/293 (CRN 1787/1788): CREATIVITY AND GIFTED

EDUC 193/293 (CRN 1787/1788): CREATIVITY AND GIFTED
Sally Beisser
Credits 2
Web-Instructed
Attribute: Drake Online Undergrad Program

Course Description: This course is designed to be an overview of creativity to include definitions and theories of creativity, characteristics of the creative person, techniques of creative thinking, metaphorical thinking, creative dramatics, models of the creative process, tests of creativity, and developing personal creativeness.

ENG 120 ADVANCED TOPICS IN WRITING

ENG 120(CRN 2278):  ADVANCED TOPICS IN WRITING
Prof. Carol Spaulding-Kruse
Web-Instructed: Monday-Friday 9am-12pm

Course Description: Good writing happens sentence by sentence. This is an intensive seminar for students interested in enhancing their skill with writing sentences for different expressive purposes. Think of it as a workout for your prose. Students will analyze and practice with a variety of sentence forms; engage in defamiliarization and experimentation; consider concepts of style, tone, voice, and transparency; and enhance editing skills such as sentence combining and concision (different from brevity). In addition, we will consider the role of the sentence in a range of historical and contemporary prose styles from belles lettres to writing for screens to functional writing and ways that syntax is used to denote and distinguish them.

Prerequisites: ENG 038, 039, 080, 090, 091, 092, or 093 or instructor permission. May be repeated once for credit when the topic varies.

HIST 015(CRN 2244): THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION OF 1917

HIST 015(CRN 2244):THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION OF 1917
Natalie Bayer
Credits 3
Web-Instructed
Attribute: Historical Foundations

Course Description: The Russian Revolution of 1917 propelled a series of radical transformations of the social, political, economic, and cultural structures of the Russian Empire. The ambitious nature of the unprecedented socialist experiment that followed has left a tremendous global legacy. This course will examine Russia’s turbulent revolutionary era through the eyes of the people who lived and witnessed these cataclysmic events. We will use multiple sources to address interpretations and reinterpretations of the revolution’s narrative, causes and outcomes. We will analyze the goals and methods of the various groups of revolutionaries, and ultimately will evaluate the revolution’s significance in terms of world history.

HIST 079(CRN 2171): THE COLD WAR THROUGH FILM

HIST 079 (CRN 2171): THE COLD WAR THROUGH FILM
Robert Collis
Credits 3
Web-Instructed
Attribute: Historical Foundations

Course Description: This course explores the history of the Cold War through the medium of film. The focus will be primarily on US and British perspectives of the Cold War, both internationally and domestically. Hence, we will chiefly utilize US and British produced films. Lectures and readings provide context. The coverage is chronological.

HIST 194 (CRN 1714): AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH POPULAR FILM

HIST 194(CRN 1714): AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH POPULAR FILM
Felicia Jamison
Credits 3
Web-Instructed
Attribute: Historical Foundations

Course Description: This class explores major themes in African American history through the medium of film. More specifically, it analyzes the ways in which popular Hollywood films construct the historical past, the ensuing battles among historians and the public over Hollywood’s version of American history, and the ways that such films can be utilized as historical documents themselves. To better understand how film can be used as historical artifacts, we will engage in critical readings and analyze primary sources from the period in which the films were created. We will consider films as products of the culture industry; as visions of popularly understood history and national mythology; as evidence for how social conflicts have been depicted; and as evidence of how popular understanding and interpretations of the past have been revised from earlier eras to the present. Over the course we will cover the themes of culture, racism, religion, slavery, migration, civil rights, gender, social movements, representation in media, and the LGBTQIA community. No prerequisites but this will be a reading and writing intensive course.

HSCI 020 (CRN 1621): INTRO TO HEALTH SCIENCES

HSCI 020 (CRN 1621): INTRO TO HEALTH SCIENCES
Dr. Jill Batten
Credits 2
Web-Instructed

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students support throughout their transition to Drake University and the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (CPHS). Students will be introduced to essential academic policies, procedures and programs that will assist them in laying a strong foundation for academic success at Drake. Students will also have the opportunity to explore various health professions and resources for academic and career planning. Course activities will include lecture, guest presentations, health professions speakers and panels, reflective activities and class discussions.

HSCI 106 (CRN 2056): CULTURE CARE AND HEALTH LIT

HSCI 106 (CRN 2056): CULTURE CARE AND HEALTH LIT
Cassity Gutierrez
Credits 3
Web-Instructed
Attribute: Global Understanding, Engaged Citizen, Community Engaged Learning

Course Description: Cultural competence, health disparities, and health literacy are important topics in health care delivery in the United States. An increasingly diverse patient population requires that health care providers acquire both generic and specific cultural knowledge for the patient populations served. It is important to address and reduce health disparities and low health literacy. This course will address the necessary adaptations to healthcare delivery that reflects an understanding of diversity between and within cultures. Health literacy, the person's ability to obtain, process, and understand health information needed to make informed health decisions, is studied in relation to health outcomes. The course will progress through four units to include: [1] Foundations of Culture Care, [2] Cultural Considerations and Application, [3] Health Disparities, and [4] Health Literacy. The course will include lecture with group discussion on current topics and case studies. Students will apply the strategies acquired through completion of a cultural competence and values self-assessment, a photovoice assignment addressing health disparities, and a health literacy project.

INTD 060 (CRN 2236): INEQUALITIES AND JUSTICE

INTD 060 (CRN 2236): INEQUALITIES AND JUSTICE
Erin Lain
Credits 3
Web Instructed

Course Description: This course will introduce students to criminological thought on the intersection between crime andmultiple social constructs such as race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexual orientation. The course willconsider how these areas impact people's interactions with the criminal justice system as offenders,victims, and workers, as well as how issues of inequality are related to crime and criminal behavior.

MUS 160 (CRN 2235): RECORD & PROD VIRTUAL ENSEMBLE

MUS 160 (CRN 2235): RECORD & PROD VIRTUAL ENSEMBLE
Andrew Classen
Credits 3
Web-Instructed
Attribute:  Artistic Experience

Course Description: This course develops the skills required to use audio and video recording and production software to create high quality videos using layered recording.  Students are not expected to have formal musical training. Students will study existing virtual ensemble videos and write and discuss their technical and aesthetic merits.  After choosing personally meaningful music and arranging/assembling it, students will record the audio and video in layers, mixing and mastering until obtaining a satisfactory final product.  Collaboration is encouraged, both inside and outside the class. Production will be posted to YouTube or other streaming and social media platforms for distribution and self-promotion.

PHAR 105 (CRN 2095): DELIVERING MEDICATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES

PHAR 105 (CRN 2095): DELIVERING MEDICATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES
Wendy Mobley-Bukstein
Credits 3
Web Instructed
Attribute: Pharmacy Prof. Elective

Course description: Delivering Medication Management Services is an active learning online course in which participants practice a variety of communication techniques to elicit a patient's medication experience and identify medication-related problems. Cases based on the real-life experiences of MTM providers will be used. Participants will gain experiences interviewing patients, identifying and prioritizing medication-related problems, developing and implementing interventions, and documenting activities. Various business models and billing strategies will be explored, and plans for implementation discussed. Through self-study modules, case studies, hands-on patient interviews, and assessment practice sessions, learners will obtain the knowledge and skills needed to establish medication therapy management services. At the end of this course, the learner will have completed the APHA Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services certificate training program (course fee applies). A course fee will be assessed to your Drake account to cover the cost of the certificate program.

PHAR 126 (CRN 1617): PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION

PHAR 126 (CRN 1617): PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION
Jamie Pitlick, Wendy Mobley-Bukstein
Credits 2
Web Instructed
Attribute: Pharmacy Prof. Elective

For the first two weeks of registration, this course will be reserved for students who have certain declared majors, minors, or concentrations. For a list of those majors, minors, and concentrations, visit the registration page.

Course description: Principles of normal nutrition are introduced; essential nutrient function and metabolism is covered, as well as dietary choices and disease-related influences. A variety of learning methods will be used, including readings, online videos, evaluation of primary literature, application and reflection, and online collaboration. Students will apply what they are learning to their daily lives.

PHIL 151/HONR 126 (CRN 2103/2108): ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

PHIL 151/HONR 126 (CRN 2103/2108): ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
Martin Roth
Credits 3
Web Instructed
Attribute: Honors Track Elective

Course Description: This course will explore the past, present, and future of Artificial Intelligence (AI). We will begin by looking at the initial aims of AI and the theoretical and technological developments that made AI look like a genuine possibility (and survey some of the early successes and failures of that research program). We will then consider the current state of AI and the way future developments may (or may not) have a significant impact on society and self. Our investigation of these topics will be informed by scholarly works (e.g. philosophy, computer science, and social science) and works of fiction (e.g., short stories and films).

POLS 136 (CRN 2238): RACIAL JUSTICE & HUMAN RIGHT IN THE U.S. AFTER WWII

POLS 136 (CRN 2238): RACIAL JUSTICE & HUMAN RIGHT IN THE U.S. AFTER WWII
Debra DeLaet
Credits 3
Web-Instructed
Attribute: Global Understanding, Historical Foundations

Course description: This course focuses on the pursuit of racial justice for African Americans in the aftermath of World War II. It provides an in-depth examination of the political intersection between the global development of international human rights law in the aftermath of WWII and the domestic politics of human rights around issues of racial justice in the United States during the same period. The creation of the United Nations in 1945, which was accompanied by the emergence of global human rights norms, fundamentally shaped domestic politics around racial justice and human rights in the United States. Civil rights organizations appealed to the United Nations and sought to use emerging global human rights discourse to challenge ongoing, systemic human rights deprivations in the United States. The course will emphasize a deep examination of these issues through careful reading of primary historical texts, including some of the drafting documents leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, petitions to the United Nations by the NAACP and the Civil Rights Congress, and the report of President Truman’s Committee on Civil Rights. This class will include asynchronous and synchronous learning, with class meetings scheduled based on student availability.

PSY 044 (CRN 2189): ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING

PSY 044 (CRN 2189): ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING
Dr. Maria Valdovinos
Credits 3
Web Instructed

Course description: This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the cognitive, social, physical, behavioral, and functional changes associated with aging; the theories related to the aging process; and the ethical concerns in geriatric care. 

SCSR 124 (CRN 2256): TEXTS, IMAGES, AUDIENCES

SCSR 124 (CRN 2256): TEXTS, IMAGES, AUDIENCES
Professor Joan McAlister
Credits 3
Web-Instructed
Attributes: Written Communication

Course description: Texts, Images, Audiences is a writing intensive course applying a range of theoretical perspectives to public discourses including both texts and images. Special attention is paid to the ways in which audiences respond to and are constructed in various forms of appeal and interpretation. We will learn the anatomy of a critical textual/visual analysis, and try a variety of methods for examining the appeals, functions, and ethics of discourse. Through a series of linked writing assignments, each student will author a new rhetorical criticism essay by the completion of this class.

SCSS 179 (CRN 2026): SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

SCSS 179 (CRN 2026): SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION
Professor Darcie Vandegrift
Credits 3
Web Instructed
Attributes: Engaged Citizen

Course description: Education is created through the social organization of aspirations and resources. The stakes are high: education can determine how children see themselves, partially determine an individual's social class, the ability she has to contribute as a citizen, and the future of the society in which the child lives. The educational system teaches values, distributes capital, and both decreases and reproduces social inequality. The class focuses on macro and micro questions in the sociology of education as well as education advocacy.

THEA 005 (CRN 1599): READINGS IN THEATRE

THEA 005 (CRN 1599): READINGS IN THEATRE
Michael Rothmayer
Credits 3
Web Instructed
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: A reading/viewing discussion-based format surveying Western dramatic literature (as well as films based on those plays), from ancient Greece to the present. For J-term we will add the following elements normally not part of the course: 1) We will be viewing either film excerpts or complete film versions of the plays read for class. This will give students the opportunity to see the text as a blueprint for a realized production. it will also allow the class to debate and discuss specific choices made by director, designers, and actors in regard to the text the students have read. 2) We will do a "table reading" of some of the assigned plays in class. The longer class period for J-term will allow us to read all or part of a play aloud in class. Hearing the language spoken will provide a level of insight that reading a play silently cannot. In short, the J-term version of the Readings in Theatre class will help students engage the text in ways unique from the fall/spring semester versions of the course.

WLC 148 (CRN 1891) INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

WLC 148 (CRN 1891) INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
Marc Pinheiro-Cadd
Credits 3
Web Instructed
Attribute: Global & Cultural Understanding

Course description: This course focuses on the applied understanding of basic concepts and principles regarding communication between people from different racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds/cultures in the context of both the globalizing world and the U.S. Through reading, discussing, writing about, and reflecting on relevant texts and films, you will become acquainted not only with some of the theory and research in the area of intercultural communication, but also with how to apply that knowledge with the goal of understanding and improving human interactions in both global and domestic contexts. Special attention will be paid to the barriers that exist between cultures that may potentially disrupt attempts at fluid intercultural communication, as well as the means to circumvent those barriers.  By developing insights into the social, cultural, and historical dimensions of relations among racial, ethnic, and gender groups, you will make progress toward achieving one of the course’s major goal: becoming aware of “cultural relativity” as an ethical guiding principle that results in respecting other cultures more than is the case when ethnocentrism is the guiding principle. We will also consider in some depth the role of the media in creating and diffusing information that affects intercultural communication. Thinking critically about issues such as these will help you demonstrate what Drake’s Mission Statement refers to as “responsible global citizenship.”

WLC 150(CRN 2201) INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ARAB CULTURE

WLC 150(CRN 2201)  INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ARAB CULTURE
Ibrahim Khalaylih
Credits 3
Web Instructed
Attribute: Global & Cultural Understanding

Course description: This course will help students better understand the main characteristics of the Arab people, their culture, and their society. The course will closely examine Arabs origins, identities, and values as well as the importance of family and language. Many other things will be examined including: classic and contemporary poetry, music, Arab thought, and the novel. The course will also include a discussion of the Arab Spring, the Syrian Refugee tragedy, and the contemporary crisis of the Arab Culture, including the social, intellectual, and political issues connected to modern Arab culture and thought. In addition, an understanding of Islam and Islamic community is necessary to fully appreciate this region of the world and its people. This course is taught in English.

University News