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J-term 2020
On-Campus & Online Courses

 

 

ON-CAMPUS COURSES

ART 70/CHEM 70 (CRN 2107/1751): ART AND CHEMISTRY

ART 71 (CRN 1795): BLACKSMITHING & ART OF UTILITY

ART 145 (CRN 2040): TEXTILE AND FIBER ART

ART 150 (CRN 1850): INTRO TO LETTERPRESS

ART 153 (CRN 1712): BOOKBINDING WORKSHOP

BIO 021 (CRN 2117): CROSSFIT 101

BIO 112L (CRN 1713): AVIAN WINTER ECOLOGY

BIO 145 (CRN 1703): 3D PRNTNG-MKG VIRTUAL TANGIBLE

BUS 191 (CRN 1607): INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS

BLAW 60 (CRN 1993): BUSINESS LAW I

CS 83 (CRN 2106): COMPUTER ETHICS

CS 190/STAT 190 (CRN 2035/2024): CASE STUDIES IN DATA ANALYTICS

COUN 154/254 (CRN 1979/1980): APPLD POS PSY:INTEGR STREN PRA

ECON 131 (CRN 2063): CHINA'S ECONOMY

ENG 136 (CRN 1955): ADOLESCENCE IN AMER. FILM

EDUC 299 (CRN 1999): INQUIRY LEARN ACROSS CONT AREA

ENG 80 (CRN 2000): READ & CREATE COMICS

HSCI 148 (CRN 2053): EXERCISE TEST & PRESCRIPTION

HSCI 149 (CRN 1715): INTRO TO AT & SPORTS MED

HSCI 150 (CRN 2092): FUNDAMENTALS IN REHAB SCIENCE

HSCI 164 (CRN 1653): TOPICS IN HEALTH SCIENCES

HSCI 196 (CRN 2100): HEALTH SCIENCES INTERNSHIP I

HSCI 197 (CRN 2101): HEALTH SCIENCES INTERNSHIP II

HIST 194 (CRN 1714): THE COLD WAR THROUGH FILM

IS 172 (CRN 2109): EXPLORING THE SILICON PRAIRIE

JMC 58 (CRN 1717): INTRO TO VISUAL COM (Non-JMC)

JMC 85 (CRN 1583): PUBLIC RELATIONS PRINCIPLES

JMC 99 (CRN 1629): SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIES

JMC 99 (CRN 1841): THE MUSIC BUSINESS

LPS 135 (CRN 2020): ON THE DOCKET

LIBR 77 (CRN 1960): FAKE NEWS, FILTERS, FALSEHOODS

LIBR 99 (CRN 1961): COPYRIGHT ISSUES IN THE U.S.

LIBR 101 (CRN 1962): REFLECTIONS ON VIDEO GAMING

MGMT 120 (CRN 1769): MANAGEMENT OF OPERATIONS

MUS 160 (CRN 2031): ACTING THROUGH ARIAS

PHAR 112 (CRN 1637): POLITICAL ADVOCACY & LEADERSHP

PHAR 118 (CRN 2097): LGBTQ HEALTH: ISSUES

PHAR 164 (CRN 1662/2080): PROBLEMS IN PHARMACY

PHAR 165 (CRN 1727): PROBLEMS IN PHARMACOLOGY

PHAR 166 (CRN 1729): PROBLEMS IN PHARMACEUT CHEM

PHIL 151/HONR 126 (CRN 2103/2108): ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

POLS 115 (CRN 2094): PRESIDENT NOMINATION PROCESS

PSY 12 (CRN 1630): WRITING IN PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 76 (CRN 2028): ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 137/WGS160 (CRN 1994/2104): PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER

REL 114/HONR 114 (CRN 2111): RELIGIONS OF DES MOINES

SCSA 153/SCSS 153 (CRN 1848/1849): DOCUMENTARY VIDEO CHALLENGE

SCSR 73 (CRN 1965): PUBLIC SPEAKING

SCSR 112 (CRN 2057): RHETORIC & WAR

SCSS 163 (CRN 2098): SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES

THEA 5 (CRN 1599): READINGS IN THEATRE

THEA 32 (CRN 1855): STAGE MAKEUP

THEA 114 (CRN 1544): CLASSIC AMERICAN FILM

WLC 148 (CRN 1891): INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

ONLINE COURSES

ACCT 41 (CRN 1766): INTRO TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

ACCT 42 (CRN 2022): INTRO TO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

BLAW 60 (CRN 1693): BUSINESS LAW I

EDUC 191/EDUC 291 (CRN 1903/1904): INTRO TO GIFTED EDUCATION

EDUC 193/293 (CRN 1787/1788): CREATIVITY AND GIFTED

HSCI 20 (CRN 1621): INTRO TO HEALTH SCIENCES

HSCI 106 (CRN 2056): CULTURE CARE AND HEALTH LIT

LIBR 042 (CRN 1660): INFO LIT: KEY TO COM/EXP LEARN

PHAR 105 (CRN 2095): DELIVERING MEDICATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES

PHAR 126 (CRN 1617): PRINCPLES OF NUTRITION

SCSS 179 (CRN 2026): SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION


ON-CAMPUS COURSES

ART 70/CHEM 70 (CRN 2107/1751): ART AND CHEMISTRY
Maura Lyons, Mark Vitha
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience and Int Study Humanities/Sciences

Course Description: This course examines the intersections of art and chemistry, with specific focus on the medium of painting.  It is grounded in the questions of what art history can learn from chemical studies of artworks, and how knowledge of art history can guide chemical inquiries.  Topics include the materials and processes of art making; the authentication, restoration, and conservation of art and their ethical implications; and the historical circumstances in which specific artworks were created.  The course will include lecture, discussion, laboratory experiments, and field trips.

ART 71 (CRN 1795): BLACKSMITHING & ART OF UTILITY
Robert Craig
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: This course will explore the relationships of form to function through the styling of utilitarian objects while maintaining a strong consideration of aesthetic appeal. Through the application of metal working techniques, students will design and create useful objects for a distinct purpose or function.

ART 145 (CRN 2040): TEXTILE AND FIBER ART
Emily Newman
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience and Engaged Citizen

Course Description: Students enrolled in this introductory J-Term course will learn traditional and contemporary methods of creating textile and fiber art including batik, applique', interlocking, digital pattern design and digital fabric printing. Emphasis will be on creating two-dimensional and three-dimensional projects in the studio supplemented by discussions and readings of historical and contemporary texts. Additionally, a collaborative project will teach students about the radical history of textiles and the tradition of community engagement in the fiber arts. Students will be required to purchase materials including $40-$80 in custom designed digitally printed fabric. This course will also include a community engaged service-learning component. Please note this course is unrelated to fashion and fashion design.

ART 150 (CRN 1850): INTRO TO LETTERPRESS
Sarah McCoy
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: This course is an introduction to letterpress and basic graphic design practices focusing on the formal organization of visual elements and the technical process of printing, resulting in creative communication. The course places emphasis on the process and method of various forms of letterpress printing to derive formal solutions to the projects. The course also includes a parallel "hand-craft" component focusing on the development of professional level artistic skills. Course activities will include demonstrations, discussions, readings, practical exercises, and applied projects--a hands-on course that teaches the basics of hand-setting metal and woodtype type. Students will learn how to lock up vintage woodtype, print on antique printing presses and print their own illustrations. The course will take place at Drake University within the graphic design department's letterpress student and at Professor Sarah McCoy's east village studio: The Permanent Collection. The course will explore old and new technologies within the field of printing, the art of fine press printing, and artist's books. No experience is necessary.

ART 153 (CRN 1712): BOOKBINDING WORKSHOP
John Fender
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: Bookbinding Workshop is a 3-credit hour studio course and may be used as a graphic design program elective, a studio art elective or a general art elective, and satisfies the Artistic Experience AOI. This course requires sophomore standing or instructor permission. Bookbinding Workshop is an introduction to the craft and design of a variety of book forms using traditional and non-traditional binding techniques. The primary goal of the course is for the student to learn basic book binding techniques and gain sufficient technical knowledge to create a variety of bound book structures and explore the historical and formal traditions of bookbinding. Course activities will include demonstrations, discussions, readings, practical exercises, applied projects, and class critiques.

BIO 021 (CRN 2117): CROSSFIT 101
Kevin Carlson
Credits: 3
Attributes:

Course Description:  An introduction to CrossFit methodology, programming, training and nutrition.  The course will contain both classroom and activity components daily.  The course instructor holds a CrossFit Level 2 certificate and has 5 years of coaching experience.

BIO 112L (CRN 1713): AVIAN WINTER ECOLOGY
Muir Eaton
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: In this J-term course, you will gain extensive experience working with birds in a field setting. You will learn and practice a fundamental took used by ornithologist and wildlife biologist for studying birds: mist-netting and banding of individuals. In addition, you will learn identification of Iowa's winter bird species, working with museum study skins as well as captured live individuals, and you will design and conduct behavioral experiments on birds, exploring their winter physiology and ecological roles. Class time will be outdoors as much as possible. You will become expert at handling and releasing live birds, and the skills developed in this course will well prepare you for advanced field studies and graduate work in Ornithology. This is an on-campus course, and we will be working at natural areas nearby Drake. Prerequisites: BIO 001, 012, 013, or 018 or see instructor for approval.

BIO 145 (CRN 1703): 3D PRNTNG-MKG VIRTUAL TANGIBLE
Jerry Honts
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: This course focuses on practical aspects of 3D printing, including the generation of printable models using 3D modeling software packages and through the use of 3D digital scanning methods. This course also examines potential uses of 3D printing in the natural sciences and biomedical engineering, as well as social and legal implications of 3D printing.

BUS 191 (CRN 1607): INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS
Mary Edrington
Credits 1.000-3.000
Attribute:

Course Description: Experiential learning credit for substantive workplace experiences. Prereq.: Sophomore standing; major in the College of Business and Public Administration; minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 and permission of the Internship Coordinator.

Coreq.: Enrollment in not more than 18 semester hours credit (including the internship) in any fall or spring semester in which internship credit is earned and 12 hours (including the internship) in the summer sessions. May be repeated, however, no more than 6 credit hours of internship work will count towards meeting graduation requirements.

BLAW 60 (CRN 1993): BUSINESS LAW I
Stephen Gara
Credits 3
Attribute: Critical Thinking and LPS Law Course and Values and Ethics

Course Description: This course discusses the basic precepts of our legal system. These precepts are then applied in the examination of the legal principles that affect business in the areas of contracts, torts and product liability. The course also addresses relevant ethical issues. Prereq.: Sophomore standing.

CS 83 (CRN 2106): COMPUTER ETHICS
Christopher Porter
Credits 3
Attribute: Int Study Humanities/Sciences and Values and Ethics

Course Description: This course increases understanding of issues related to ethics, professional conduct and social responsibility as they arise in Computer Science and applications of Information Technology. Additionally, the course serves to develop 1) the ability to think clearly; 2) habits of professional responsibility and behavior; and 3) effective writing and presentation skills. Students are exposed to the history of the discipline from a social point of view, and to various frameworks from which ethical and professional decisions must be made within the discipline. Sophomore, junior, or senior standing required.

CS 190/STAT 190 (CRN 2035/2024): CASE STUDIES IN DATA ANALYTICS
Eric Manley
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: In this course, students will apply descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive data analysis methods learned in previous courses to new cases. Students will learn to effectively manage long-term data analysis projects within diverse teams through a complete data analytics project lifecycle and compelling communicate outcomes through writing and oral presentations which include appropriate use of data visualizations. Credits: 3. Pre-requisites: (1) CS 066, (2) STAT/MATH 130 or ACTS/MATH 131, and (3) two of STAT 170, STAT 172, CS 167, CS 178.

COUN 154/254 (CRN 1979/1980): APPLD POS PSY:INTEGR STREN PRA
Bengu Erguner-Tekinalp
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with diverse populations, including people from minority ethnic backgrounds, people with disabilities, and members other underrepresented groups. Students will develop an understanding of the historical experience of individuals from diverse backgrounds including power and wealth differentials with the majority culture. Students will also have opportunities to interact with people from different backgrounds to reflect on their personal experiences and interactions with culturally different individuals. Readings will provide a systematic way by which these experiences can be analyzed and discussed.

ECON 131 (CRN 2063): CHINA'S ECONOMY
Liping Zheng
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: China's economy has grown more rapidly than any other major economy in recent years. This course examins causes and consequences of this growth, including trends, challenges, policy responses and current developments. Similarities and differences between U.S. and Chinese economic institutions will be examined in detail. Prereq.: ECON 010 or ECON 001, and MATH 020.

ENG 136 (CRN 1955): ADOLESCENCE IN AMER. FILM
Beth Younger
Credits 3
Attribute: Women's Studies Course

Course Description: This course explores depictions of problematic adolescence in contemporary American fiction and film. We read novels, essays, and view films with an eye toward understanding how western culture has constructed the adolescent experience. This course will expect students to engage in critical thinking, close reading and textual analysis to analyze, interpret, and interrogate texts. Additionally, we will consider the racial, public, familial, and educational aspects of adolescence and how these texts complicate our idea of what it mean to be a teenager.

EDUC 299 (CRN 1999): INQUIRY LEARN ACROSS CONT AREA
Allyn Locker
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description:This course will focus on inquiry as a teaching and learning practice across all content areas.  It is designed to develop a working knowledge of inquiry and the Universal Constructs. The performance objectives for the course are aligned with the NETS standards for teachers, the INTASC standards and the Iowa Core. Collaborative learning and professional communication practices will be implemented through a collective inquiry process.

ENG 80 (CRN 2000): READ & CREATE COMICS
Amy Letter
Credits 4
Attribute: Written Communication

Course description: In this course we will read and create comics for both page and screen. Readings will include comics which have been written and/or adapted for print or digital presentation. Students will have the opportunity to write and create comics intended for both formats, and will have the opportunity to experiment with options like using GIFs to animate panels, etc. It’s helpful but not necessary for students to have access to a tablet or other device that easily accommodates digital drawing; no drawing experience required.

HSCI 148 (CRN 2053): EXERCISE TEST & PRESCRIPTION
Kimberly Huey
Credits 3
Attribute: Pharmacy Prof. Elective

Course Description: The purpose of this course it to provide the opportunity to utilize state of the art laboratory equipment and techniques to learn the concepts of physiological fitness testing and exercise prescription.  Exercise prescription and the implementation of conditioning programs will include individuals of differing ages, fitness levels, and health status.  Emphasis is on the five major health-related components of physical fitness:  [1] cardiorespiratory fitness, [2] muscular strength, [3] muscular endurance, [4] flexibility, and [5] body composition.  The course will include hands-on exercise testing using class members, interpretation of test results, and effective design of exercise programs [i.e. prescriptions].

HSCI 149 (CRN 1715): INTRO TO AT & SPORTS MED
TBD, Instructor
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: This is an introductory lecture course with a lab included. The course will allow students to acquire the skills to recognize common injuries, illnesses and issues occurring in an athletic environment.  The lab portion of the class will provide a hands-on approach to prevention and rehabilitation techniques including taping, therapeutic exercise and modalities.  It is strongly recommended that students taking this course have had a previous course in human anatomy.

HSCI 150 (CRN 2092): FUNDAMENTALS IN REHAB SCIENCE
Alisa Drapeaux
Credits 2
Attribute:

Course Description: An introductory course for HSCI students including: pre-OT, pre-PT, and pre-AT to introduce the fundamentals of rehabilitation science. The course will provide a historical and theoretical foundation of rehabilitation science, to include: law and policies related to rehabilitation. In this course, the student will learn the various roles of health care professionals in the rehabilitation setting (PT/OT/ATC) and their individual scope of practice. Students will also partake in team-based learning with demonstrating clinical evaluation techniques and career planning projects. Within this J-term course, the student will also be required to shadow a healthcare professional in an outpatient or inpatient rehabilitation unit. The course will consist of a hybrid style of both lab and lecture.

HSCI 164 (CRN 1653): TOPICS IN HEALTH SCIENCES
TBA
Credits 1.000-4.000
Attribute:

Course Description: This Independent Study course offering provides an opportunity for students to participate in an undergraduate research or experience in a specific area of Health Sciences under the guidance and direction of a faculty member. Registration for this course must be pre-arranged with a faculty member and submitted for approval through the completion of an Independent Study form available in the College Dean's Office to the appropriate Department Chair and Associate Dean. In addition to approaching individual faculty members about opportunities in their areas of expertise, research/experience opportunities may also be available in Career bluePrint and the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Weekly Announcements.

HSCI 196 (CRN 2100): HEALTH SCIENCES INTERNSHIP I
HSCI 197 (CRN 2101): HEALTH SCIENCES INTERNSHIP II
TBA
Credits 3
Attribute: Community Engaged Learning

Course Requirements: Must be a Health Sciences student in their senior year or otherwise approved by the Director of Health Sciences Experiential Education. All students must be up to date on adult, pediatric, and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR], blood borne pathogen training, and HIPAA training prior to the start of the experience. All students are required to have completed the following immunizations prior to the start of the Senior Experience 196 course: Series of Hepatitis B Vaccine, Tdap, 2 MMR, Influenza Vaccine; PPD: TB skin test and proof of Chicken Pox Infection or Vaccine.

Course Description: This course, the second of a two-term experiential sequence, is a component of the required Health Sciences Senior Capstone Experience. The purpose of this course is to provide students experiential opportunities related to health science issues and careers in their chosen pathway. Students will complete focused learning opportunities with preceptors on projects related to healthcare or other health sciences fields. Learning components include active learning site time, reflective communication, assessments, and documentation consistent with an experiential course.

HIST 194 (CRN 1714): THE COLD WAR THROUGH FILM
Curt Cardwell
Credits 3
Attribute: Historical Foundations and Historical Consciousness

Course Description: This course explores the history of the Cold War through the medium of film. The focus is primarily on the American side of the Cold War, both internationally and domestically, and chiefly utilizes American produced films.

IS 172 (CRN 2109): EXPLORING THE SILICON PRAIRIE
Alanah Mitchell
Credits 3
Attribute: Historical Foundations

Course Description: This class is designed for students with an interest in technology and its various applications not only in the business realm, but also in society at large. This course will explore the history of technology and focus on how these powerful systems have fundamentally reshaped modern organizations along with our society. Particular emphasis will be placed on the "Silicon Prairie" we live in, as well as the global world. Topics of study will range from the technologies, methods, and practices of developing new innovations to how this knowledge and these skills are applied to re-engineer business processes.

JMC 58 (CRN 1717): INTRO TO VISUAL COM (Non-JMC)
Lee Jolliffe
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: Survey of visual communications, including basic page/screen design, type and typography, color, illustrations, and concepts. Each topic is approached both analytically and aesthetically. Designed for non-journalism majors only. Laptop required (minimum: i3 processor, 4 gigs of ram, 200 gigs of free storage space, Wireless N.) subscription to the Creative Suite.

JMC 85 (CRN 1583): PUBLIC RELATIONS PRINCIPLES
Kelly Bruhn
Credits 3
Attribute: Community Engaged Learning and Engaged Citizen

For the first two weeks of registration, this course will be open only to students who have certain declared majors, minors, or concentrations. For a list of those majors, minors, and concentrations, visit the registration page.

Course Description: This course explores the role of public relations in today's organizations. Students will develop an appreciation for and understanding of the critical thinking, research, planning and communication skills necessary for the effective practice of public relations. Students will acquire a solid foundation in the basic theories and concepts of communication, persuasion, motivation and learning which are integral parts in the success of public relations and in engaging people. Prereq.: Sophomore standing

JMC 99 (CRN 1629): SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIES
Christopher Snider
Credits 3
Attribute: Information Literacy

Course Description: This class explores the role of social media in our everyday lives, from the way we communicate with our friends to the way businesses communicate with customers. Students will create and execute a personal social media strategy as well as creating social media strategies for businesses and organizations.

JMC 99 (CRN 1841): THE MUSIC BUSINESS
Tobi Parks, Thomas Kutz
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: "A Peek Behind the Curtain of the Music Business" is an interdisciplinary study of the music industry, including music publishing, music promotion, music business ethics, emerging music business technologies, copyright law, and other subjects directly pertinent to understanding today's music industry landscape. The course will include a practical look at the industry through the work of Station 1 Records, a local record label. The course includes daily guest speakers both in class and via video conference with executives from the leading companies in the music business like Sony Music, Warner Music Group, Kobalt Music Publishing , and others.

Station 1 Records is a non-profit artist entrepreneurship program dedicated to the development and patronage of independent music artists. Station 1 provides a platform for artists and opportunities for students interested in working in the business to do hands-on work in recording, distribution, public relations, marketing, promotion, and tour support.

LPS 135 (CRN 2020): ON THE DOCKET
Renee Cramer
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: In this course, we will read the briefs and lower court decisions, listen to oral arguments, and follow press coverage, of the cases that the Court heard in the fall of 2018 to decide in summer 2019. We will make predictions about the Court's likely decisions, based on our knowledge of the sitting justices, and talk about the ways in which politics and law interact and intersect in these cases. Each student will leave the course with a greater understanding of Supreme Court processes, history, and impact - and with the knowledge and legal research skills they need to discover, and evaluate, the Court's decisions in the summer.  

LIBR 77 (CRN 1960): FAKE NEWS, FILTERS, FALSEHOODS
Dan Chibnall
Credits 3
Attribute: Engaged Citizen and Information Literacy

Course description: We live in an age of information overload, where individuals can create their own, private news and media enclaves. Social media allows us to filter out what we don't care to see and engage with ideas that sometimes only serve to reinforce our existing beliefs and ideas. This new era also presents us with the dangers of "fake news" that so closely resembles the real thing that even the most discerning eye cannot pick it our of a line up. This course will focus on how we can navigate the rivers of information, become discerning consusmers, separate fact from fiction, and approach daily sources of information with an objective eye. We will also explore the effects of information overload, how we can become more information literate in a society saturated with various forms of media, and how that can help us be more engaged citizens.

LIBR 99 (CRN 1961): COPYRIGHT ISSUES IN THE U.S.
Marcia Keyser
Credits 3
Attribute: Engaged Citizen

Course Description: Whether you are writing a song for performance, taking notes in class, or posting an event on Facebook, do you have copyright protection for what you do? If you share someone else's story, can he or she claim infringement? What is copyright, anyway? Take this Engaged Citizen class for an overview of copyright law and the many ways it affects our lives in the United States.

LIBR 101 (CRN 1962): REFLECTIONS ON VIDEO GAMING
Cameron Tuai
Credits 3
Attribute: Engaged Citizen

Course Description: The J-Term class will explore the relationship between video games, gamers and their communities. Starting with the question, "what is a game" student will develop foundational knowledge of video gaming concepts such as aesthetics, narrative, rules and design. From these basic elements, students will then explore the ideals of community as the interaction between the social values "coded" into a video game and game play as a means to communicate membership within that community. In particular, students will have an opportunity to critically reflect how video games and norms or game play shape community ideas of race, gender and sexual identity.

MGMT 120 (CRN 1769): MANAGEMENT OF OPERATIONS
Bradley Meyer
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: A study of the operations function of organizations, focusing on providing services and producing goods efficiently and effectively. Students learn how to analyze, measure, and improve work methods; make capacity decisions; manage waiting lines; and control the flow of materials along the supply chain. The course also discusses ethics and sustainabilty; monitoring and improving quality, allocating scarce resources and managing projects. Prereq.: MATH 020 or MATH 028; IS 044; one of STAT 072, ACTS/MATH 131 or STAT 170; and sophomore standing.   

MUS 160 (CRN 2031): ACTING THROUGH ARIAS
Christine Blanner
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: Specialized study and/or discussion of selected topics in music. The course may focus on important historical, theoretical, educational, or performance issues, among others.

PHAR 112 (CRN 1637): POLITICAL ADVOCACY & LEADERSHP
Thomas Temple
Credits 2
Attribute: Pharmacy Prof. Elective

Course Description: Political advocacy and leadership are highly valued in the profession of pharmacy.  This interactive elective course provides the requisite knowledge, develops skills, and models behaviors so students can become political advocates and leaders in the profession.  This course consists of a series of prominent speakers from within and outside the profession.  Student pharmacists will develop effective advocacy skills through discussion and reflections based upon their experiences with instructors and assigned readings.

PHAR 118 (CRN 2097): LGBTQ HEALTH: ISSUES
Anisa Fornoff, Tony Tyler
Credits 3
Attribute: Pharmacy Prof. Elective

Course Description: This class will focus on understanding healthcare issues affecting the LGBTQ population. Learners will examine topics such as health disparities, advocacy, effective communication, as well as mental and physical health concerns for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities. For a significant portion of this course, students will actively engage with local community partners on projects related to LGBTQ health care. This course will include a variety of learning methods: lecture, small group discussion, group presentations, and service-learning.

Pharmacy Independent Studies

PHAR 164 (CRN 1662/2080): PROBLEMS IN PHARMACY
PHAR 165 (CRN 1727): PROBLEMS IN PHARMACOLOGY
PHAR 166 (CRN 1729): PROBLEMS IN PHARMACEUT CHEM
TBA
Credits 0.000 TO 6.000 Credit hours
Attribute: Pharmacy Prof. Elective

Course Description: This Independent Study course offering provides an opportunity for students to participate in an undergraduate research or experience in a specific area of Pharmacy under the guidance and direction of a faculty member. Registration for this course must be pre-arranged with a faculty member and submitted for approval through the completion of an Independent Study form available in the College Dean's Office to the appropriate Department Chair and Associate Dean. In addition to approaching individual faculty members about opportunities in their areas of expertise, research/experience opportunities may also be available in Career bluePrint and the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Weekly Announcements.

PHIL 151/HONR 126 (CRN 2103/2108)): ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
Martin Roth
Credits 3
Attribute: Honors Track Elective

Course Description: This course will explore the past, present, and future of Artificial Intelligence (AI). We will begin by looking at the initial aims of AI and the theoretical and technological developments that made AI look like a genuine possibility (and survey some of the early successes and failures of that research program). We will then consider the current state of AI and the way future developments may (or may not) have a significant impact on society and self. Our investigation of these topics will be informed by scholarly works (e.g. philosophy, computer science, and social science) and works of fiction (e.g., short stories and films).

POLS 115 (CRN 2094): PRESIDENT NOMINATION PROCESS
Gregory Wolf

Credits 3
Attribute: Engaged Citizen and LPS Public Policy Course

Course Description: An in-depth study of the presidential campaign process, with special attention to the role of the Iowa Caucuses and the structure, timing and sequence of the nomination process on the way we choose our Presidential candidates. Focus on the role of money, media, voters and candidate strategy. Examination of the impact of the system on the ability of Presidents to govern. Prereq.: POLS 001 or instructor's consent. 

PSY 12 (CRN 1630): WRITING IN PSYCHOLOGY
Olga Lazareva
Credits 3
Attribute: Written Communication

Course Description: This course introduces students to principles and conventions of written communications in psychology. We consider key genres of writing within psychology, features of psychological styles and format, and conventions of writing style. This is a writing-intensive course that includes a variety of short assignments and one long review paper.

PSY 76 (CRN 2028): ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
Greg Lengel
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: This course exposes students to some general clinical perspectives about human behavior and psychological problems. Several major theoretical approaches to personality, abnormal behavior, assessment, and treatment are discussed in the context of psychological disorders such as substance abuse, depression, schizophrenia and family violence. Prereq.: PSY 001.

PSY 137/WGS160 (CRN 1994/2104): PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER
Jill Allen
Credits 3
Attribute: Community Engaged Learning and Int Study Humanities/Sciences and Women's and Gender Studies

Course Description: This course is designed to provide an overview of contemporary and traditional psychological research on how sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender expression, gender identity, and gender performance influence the human experience. These issues will be explored at the individual, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural levels. Specifically, by the completion of this class I would like you to be able to synthesize, recognize, and apply the issues we learn and discuss to your everyday lives. Although many people assume that a psychology of sex and gender class is more relevant for biological females and feminine people, in this class we will learn just as much about the male and masculine experience and behavior, and hopefully come away with an appreciation not only for the differences between the genders, but also for how similar humans truly are. Class meetings will incorporate lecture, discussion, research simulations, film clips, and group presentations to help facilitate your learning. Prereq.: PSY 001 or PSY 030. Cross listed with WS 160. May be used as part of Women's and Gender Studies Concentration.

REL 114/HONR 114 (CRN 2111): RELIGIONS OF DES MOINES
Timothy Knepper
Credits 3
Attribute: Global and Cultural Understand, Honors Track and International & Multicultural

Course Description: This class serves as an introduction to religion as it is lived and practiced in diverse religious communities throughout the greater Des Moines area. Many of our class meetings will occur at local places of worship, some during religious services. We will focus on those communities featured in the Drake-student written, photo narrative A Spectrum of Faith: Religions of the World in America’s Heartland. We will be joined by a group of graduate students and a faculty member from one of Drake’s international partner institutions, Minzu University of China. In addition to learning about religion in Des Moines, these students will share their experiences in creating their own photo narrative on religion in Beijing.

SCSA 153/SCSS 153 (CRN 1848/1849): DOCUMENTARY VIDEO CHALLENGE
Sandra Patton-Imani
Credits 3
Attribute: Community Engaged Learning and SOC Research Design Course

Course Description: This course will be an immersion in methods of qualitative fieldwork and digital video as cultural critique. Students will be introduced to ethnographic participant-observation and interviewing methods, as well as video editing techniques. During the three-week J-term course students will work in small groups to conduct ethnographic research, document it on videotape, and produce short video essays that will be put on both the IRC web site for community outreach and the Drake Cultures of Engagement site. This course will serve as an introduction to qualitative interview-based research and critical digital storytelling. SCS: Research design course and CEL course. This course is cross-listed with SCSS 153.

SCSR 73 (CRN 1965): PUBLIC SPEAKING
Godfried Asante
Credits 3
Attribute: Engaged Citizen and Critical Thinking

Course Description: Introduction to the principles of argument about public policy with emphasis on effective performance.

SCSR 112 (CRN 2057): RHETORIC & WAR
William Lewis
Credits 3
Attribute: Values and Ethics

Course Description: Discussion of the relationships between war and public discourse, with special attention to public debate about the conduct of war, the effect of war on ideas about public discourse, and the representation of war in contemporary media.

SCSS 163 (CRN 2098): SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES
Michael Haedicke
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: This course explores how concerns about social equity, environmental welfare, and resilience in the face of rapid and disruptive change are shaping the character of human communities in the 21st century. Using ideas from the interdisciplinary fields of urban studies and community planning, students will investigate how processes of political advocacy, decision making, and sustainable design are occurring in cities, suburbs, and towns. The course also includes a community-engaged learning component that will bring students into dialogue with planners and residents in the city of Des Moines.

THEA 5 (CRN 1599): READINGS IN THEATRE
Michael Rothmayer
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: A reading/viewing discussion based format surveying Western dramatic literature (as well as films based on those plays), from ancient Greece to the present. For J-term we will add the following elements normally not part of the course: 1) We will be viewing either film excerpts or complete film versions of the plays read for class. This will give students the opportunity to see the text as a blueprint for a realized production. it will also allow the class to debate and discuss specific choices made by director, designers, and actors in regard to the text the students have read. 2) We will do a "table reading" of some of the assigned plays in class. The longer class period for J-term will allow us to read all or part of a play aloud in class. Hearing the language spoken will provide a level of insight that reading a play silently cannot. In short, the J-term version of the Readings in Theatre class will help students engage the text in ways unique from the fall/spring semester versions of the course.

THEA 32 (CRN 1855): STAGE MAKEUP
Josefa Poppen
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: Study of various stage makeup techniques through assigned projects and practical applications. Emphasis is on designing makeup for an audience proximity of 30 feet. Course is generally offered in fall semester only.

THEA 114 (CRN 1544): CLASSIC AMERICAN FILM
John Holman
Credits 3
Attribute: Artistic Experience

Course Description: In this J-term course we will look at nine classic Hollywood films from the point of view of the writers who penned the screen plays. The unique perspective of the writer is one that is seldom explored, their work being overshadowed by the promotion of the actors and directors. In-class film viewing and discussion is required. Purchase of a text is necessary; additional reading assignments will be made from web-based sources. Information about film genre and terminology will be reviewed and included in weekly quizzes.

WLC 148 (CRN 1891): INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
Marc Pinheiro-Cadd
Credits 3
Attribute: Global and Cultural Understand and International & Multicultural

Course Description: The discipline of intercultural communication deals with human interactions between and among culturally different individuals in the context of the globalizing world as well as U.S. co-cultures. The purpose of this course is to raise students' awareness of “cultural relativity” as an ethical guiding principle, which prompts them to recognize the danger of ethnocentric arrogance and come to respect other cultures. It is also important for students to understand that their usually unconscious absolute dogmatism to view their own culture as superior to others (e.g. “the greatest nation on Earth”) will hinder their foreign language acquisition, because any foreign language they attempt to learn has a unique configuration of denotations and connotations, which is quite different from their own. In short, students must strive to learn how to see “reality” from within the culture of a foreign language rather than from their own. Three major components of the course are intercultural communication theories, foreign language acquisition, and mass media images.


ONLINE COURSES

ACCT 41 (CRN 1766): INTRO TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
Kelley Ellis
Credits 3
Attribute: Critical Thinking

Course Description: The elements of the financial statements, accounting for deferrals, the double-entry accounting system, internal control and cash, receivables and payables, inventory, operational assets, long-term debt, equity transactions, income measurement, and comprehensive treatment of the balance sheet, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Financial statement analysis will be integrated throughout the course. Prereq.: None.

ACCT 42 (CRN 2022): INTRO TO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
Jaime Grandstaff
Credits 3
Attribute:

Course Description: Explaining manufacturing and nonmanufacturing costs and how they are reported in the financial statements, computing the cost of providing a service or manufacturing a product, determining cost behavior as activity levels change, accumulating and presenting relevant data for decision-making, profit planning and budgeting, capital expenditure decisions and financial statement analysis. Prereq.: ACCT 041.   

BLAW 60 (CRN 1693): BUSINESS LAW I
Royce Fichtner
Credits 3
Attribute: Critical Thinking and LPS Law Course and Values and Ethics

Course Description: This course discusses the basic precepts of our legal system. These precepts are then applied in the examination of the legal principles that affect business in the areas of contracts, torts and product liability. The course also addresses relevant ethical issues. Prereq.: Sophomore standing.

EDUC 191/EDUC 291 (CRN 1903/1904): INTRO TO GIFTED EDUCATION
Ashley Delaney
Credits 3
Attribute: Drake Online Undergrad Program

Course Description: This comprehensive introduction to gifted education combines both theory and practice. In addition to developing an understanding of the history of gifted education and the characteristics, identification, special programs, and related law, participants will learn about instructional models, programming options, assessments, and evaluation. Practical components such as recources, beginning a program, and special programs available, as well as parent education will be addressed.

EDUC 193/293 (CRN 1787/1788): CREATIVITY AND GIFTED
Sally Beisser
Credits 2
Attribute: Drake Online Undergrad Program

Course Description: This course is designed to be an overview of creativity to include definitions and theories of creativity, characteristics of the creative person, techniques of creative thinking, metaphorical thinking, creative dramatics, models of the creative process, tests of creativity, and developing personal creativeness.

HSCI 20 (CRN 1621): INTRO TO HEALTH SCIENCES
Jill Batten
Credits 2
Attribute:

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students support throughout their transition to Drake University and the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (CPHS). Students will be introduced to essential academic policies, procedures and programs that will assist them in laying a strong foundation for academic success at Drake.  Students will also have the opportunity to explore various health professions and resources for academic and career planning.  Course activities will include lecture, guest presentations, health professions speakers and panels, reflective activities and class discussions.

HSCI 106 (CRN 2056): CULTURE CARE AND HEALTH LIT
Cassity Gutierrez
Credits 3
Attribute: Community Engaged Learning and Engaged Citizen and Global and Cultural Understand and Pharmacy Prof. Elective

Course Description: Cultural competence, health disparities, and health literacy are important topics in health care delivery in the United States.  An increasingly diverse patient population requires that health care providers acquire both generic and specific cultural knowledge for the patient populations served.  It is important to address and reduce health disparities and low health literacy.  This course will address the necessary adaptations to healthcare delivery that reflects an understanding of diversity between and within cultures. Health literacy, the person's ability to obtain, process, and understand health information needed to make informed health decisions, is studied in relation to health outcomes. The course will progress through four units to include: [1] Foundations of Culture Care, [2] Cultural Considerations and Application, [3] Health Disparities, and [4] Health Literacy.  The course will include lecture with group discussion on current topics and case studies.  Students will apply the strategies acquired through completion of a cultural competence and values self-assessment, a photovoice assignment addressing health disparities, and a health literacy project.

LIBR 042 (CRN 1660): INFO LIT: KEY TO COM/EXP LEARN
Bruce Gilbert
Credits: 3
Attribute:

Course Description: Modern students and modern learning are enmeshed in the various communities that give education its context. This course will explore the relevance of information literacy in the community-based environment and impart an understanding of how intelligent use of information resources can benefit both the student and the community.  Emphasis will also be placed on preparing students for experiential learning (both within the academic curriculum and as a lifelong perspective).  Students will be challenged to engage and research community-based resources, create at least one artifact of that involvement (such as an interview, oral history, or research project) and reflect upon the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to marshaling information, especially in the context of experiential learning and community engagement.

PHAR 105 (CRN 2095): DELIVERING MEDICATION MANANAGEMENT SERVICES
Wendy Mobley-Bukstein
Credits 3
Attribute: Pharmacy Prof. Elective

Course Description: Delivering Medication Management Services is an active learning online course in which participants practice a variety of communication techniques to elicit a patient's medication experience and identify medication-related problems.  Cases based on the real-life experiences of MTM providers will be used.  Participants will gain experiences interviewing patients, identifying and prioritizing medication-related problems, developing and implementing interventions, and documenting activities.  Various business models and billing strategies will be explored, and plans for implementation discussed.  Through self-study modules, case studies, hands-on patient interviews, and assessment practice sessions, learners will obtain the knowledge and skills needed to establish medication therapy management services.  At the end of this course, the learner will have completed the APHA Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services certificate training program. 

PHAR 126 (CRN 1617): PRINCPLES OF NUTRITION
Jamie Pitlick, Wendy Mobley-Bukstein
Credits 2
Attribute: Pharmacy Prof. Elective

For the first two weeks of registration, this course will be reserved for students who have certain declared majors, minors, or concentrations. For a list of those majors, minors, and concentrations, visit the registration page.

Course Description: In this course, principles of normal nutrition are introduced.  Each essential nutrient function and metabolism is studied as well as cultural, societal, and economic influences on eating disorders and habits.  An emphasis is placed on the application of nutrition principles within the health care setting.

SCSS 179 (CRN 2026): SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION
Darcie Vandegrift
Credits 3
Attribute: Engaged Citizen

Course Description: Education is created through the social organization of aspirations and resources. The stakes are high: education can determine how children see themselves, partially determine an individual's social class, the ability she has to contribute as a citizen, and the future of the society in which the child lives. The educational system teaches values, distributes capital, and both decreases and reproduces social inequality. The class focuses on macro and micro questions in the sociology of education as well as education advocacy.

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