Courses

Psychology Courses--Lower Level

Psychology Courses--Upper Level

Neuroscience Courses


Psychology Courses—Lower Level

PSY 001: INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY, 4 credit hrs.
A survey of contemporary methods and approaches to the science of behavior, which may include such topics as methodology, physiology, developmental and social psychology, sensation, perception, learning, intelligence, personality, and mental illness and treatment. Psychology lab is required. The laboratory uses experiments, discussions, demonstrations and other activities to complement the materials in the lecture. Psychology 001 is required for majors and minors.

PSY 010: RESEARCH METHODS, 3 credit hrs.
This course provides an introduction to research methods in psychology. Students develop skills to read and critically evaluate psychological research published in professional journals or reports presented in popular media, as well as acquire a knowledge base for designing original research in psychology. The course combines lecture and laboratory work, and includes designing, conducting, analyzing, and reporting a group research project in written form. The course serves as a prerequisite to many upper division courses in the Department of Psychology. Pre-req: PSY 001.

PSY 011: INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS, 4 credit hrs.
This course is an introduction to the methods, strategies, and analytic prodecures commonly employed in the behavioral and life sciences to conduct and report empirical and experimental research. Through a combination of four hours of lecture and a two-hour laboratory session each week, students learn the fundamental theoretical and practical aspects of statistical analysis, as well as its strengths and limitations. The course prepares students to comprehend and evaluate critically scientific literature and provides a knowledge base from which they may draw in designing psychological research. Since these foundations in quantitative and scientific literacy are essential for advanced work in psychology, this course serves as a prerequisite to many upper division psychology courses. Pre-req: PSY 001; MATH 020 recommended.

PSY 012: WRITING IN PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
This course introduces students to principles and conventions of written communications in psychology. We consider key genres of writing within psychology, features of psychological styles and format, and conventions of writing style. This is a writing-intensive course that includes a variety of short assignments and one long review paper.

PSY 024: ANIMAL BEHAVIOR, 3 credit hrs.
This course provides an introduction to the study of animal behavior often called ethology, with an emphasis on evolutionary approach. Although ethological and evolutionary approaches can be successfully applied to human behavior, this course primarily deals with animal behavior in natural environments. We cover a variety of topics, including: natural selection and evolution, development of behavior, neural and hormonal control of behavior, predator- prey interactions, foraging behavior, territoriality, reproductive behavior, and social behavior. In addition, students design, conduct, write up, and present a group research project as part of their coursework. Cross-listed with BIO 025. Prereqs: PSY 001 or BIO 013 or NSCI 001.

PSY 026: HUMAN EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
Human social behavior is critically examined from the perspective of modern evolutionary theory. Do people behave in ways that tend to maximize their reproductive success? The course examines the issues critically, and uses readings to facilitate vigorous classroom discussion. Topics include: the history of the Darwinian revolution, sexual selection, kin selection, human evolutionary history, the evolution of mating systems, strategies for reproduction, and Darwinian views of "moral" behavior -- specifically, altruism and cooperation. Prereqs: PSY 001 or BIO 012 or BIO 013.

PSY 028: DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR, 3 credit hrs.
In this course we examine a range of recreational and therapeutic drugs that people use primarily for their psychological and behavioral effects. Among the areas of focus are: 1) understanding how drugs exert their actions on brain chemistry to create the desired effect, and 2) examining issues of addiction, tolerance, recovery, etc. Examples of categories of drugs discussed include: opiates, alcohol, hallucinogens, stimulants, and commonly used psychotropic medications. Prereq: PSY 001.

PSY 030: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
A survey of theories and research in social psychology in which we focus primarily upon the effects of people and situations on human behavior. Topics include person perception, social cognition, stereotyping/prejudice, social influence, aggression, altruism and helping behavior, and group dynamics. Prereq.: PSY 001.

PSY 042: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
An overview and analysis of physical, mental, social and emotional development during childhood and adolescence. The course focuses on interplay of genetic factors, maturational status, and experience in determining the course of behavioral development. Prereq.: PSY 001.

PSY 044: ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING, 3 credit hrs.
This course provides students with an understanding of the cognitive, social, physical, behavioral, and functional changes associated with aging; the theories related to the aging process; and the ethical concerns in geriatric care. Furthermore, students learn about the services provided by a community-based, non-profit agency and acquire experience interacting with elders by completing a service-learning component as part of this course. Prereq.: PSY 001.

PSY 060: PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOR, 3 credit hrs.
This course provides a broad overview of both theoretical and applied aspects of the scientific study of behavior called behavior analysis. Students learn about the basic philosophy, principles and procedures of behavior analysis. Students also learn how these principles and procedures can be used to understand and modify real-life behaviors. Prereq: PSY 001.

PSY 072: ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
An introduction to the field of environmental psychology. Psychology needs ecology; ecology needs psychology. The field of psychology cannot continue to ignore the ecological context of human life, and environmentalists need psychologists to help them understand human behavior, which the root cause of most contemporary environmental problems. The purposes of this course are to survey central issues in the emerging field of ecological psychology, to examine competing conceptions of this field, and to review our growing understanding of the relationship between human beings and the physical environment. We'll study global problems, their environmental effects and mechanisms, and explore possible solutions based on behavioral interventions. Prerequisite: PSY 001. Cross-listed with ENSP 072.

PSY 076: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
This course exposes students to some general clinical perspectives about human behavior and psychological problems. Several major theoretical approaches to personality, abnormal behavior, assessment, and treatment are discussed in the context of psychological disorders such as substance abuse, depression, schizophrenia and family violence. Prereq.: PSY 001.

PSY 080: SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
Examination of the role of psychology in the analysis and motivation of competitive athletics and physical fitness activities. Prereq.: PSY 001.

PSY 081: HUMAN SEXUALITY, 3 credit hrs.
A survey of contemporary knowledge of human sexuality, focusing on the biological, psychological and social determinants of sexual behavior, including sexual responses, relationships, variations, diseases and dysfunctions. Prereq.: PSY 001.

PSY 085: ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
An examination of factors that affect human behavior in organizations. Topics include job attitudes and satisfaction, motivation, leadership, organizational culture, communication, job design and human factors. Prereq: PSY 001.

PSY 090: INDEPENDENT STUDY, 1-3 credit hrs.
Directed independent study that introduces students to techniques and skills that are necessary to conduct advanced research (PSY 190/191). Written consent of instructor is required to register for this course.

PSY 091: INDEPENDENT STUDY, 1-3 credit hrs.
Directed independent study that introduces students to techniques and skills that are necessary to conduct advanced research (PSY 190/191). Written consent of instructor is required to register for this course.

PSY 095: SPECIAL TOPICS, 1-4 credit hrs.
A variable topics course designed to introduce students to selected topics of contemporary significance in scientific psychology. Contact the Psychology Department or adviser for details on topics for a particular semester. Course credit varies with extensiveness of the topic. Prereq.: PSY 001.

Psychology Courses—Upper Level

PSY 111: ADVANCED STATISTICS, 4 credit hrs.
The course focuses on statistical decision theory as a conceptual foundation for analysis of variance designs and models in psychological and biomedical research. Topics include completely randomized, randomized blocks, and mixed designs, derivation of expected mean squares, simple main effects analysis, multiple comparison procedures, and trend analysis. The lab focuses on the methods for data analysis, including the use of microcomputer programs. Prereqs.: PSY 001, PSY 010 and PSY 011.

PSY 120: CONDITIONING AND LEARNING LAB, 1 credit hr.
A self-paced laboratory experience illustrating the principles of conditioning and learning. These principles are illustrated through a series of experiments in which rats are trained to respond on a variety of reinforcement schedules, learn discriminations and perform complex chains of behavior. Students enrolling in PSY 120 also must enroll in PSY 121 the same semester. Prereq.: PSY 001, PSY 010 or PSY 011 (or BIO 099 or STAT 071 and STAT 072). PSY 060 recommended. Co-requisite: PSY 121.

PSY 121: CONDITIONING & LEARNING LECTURE, 3 credit hrs.
An analysis of the principles of human and animal conditioning and learning. The course reviews theories and experimental foundations of classical and operant conditioning. Special attention is given to reinforcement schedules, positive and aversive control, discrimination learning, stimulus control, memory and cognition, and biological bases of learning. Students must also enroll in PSY 120 the same semester. Prereq: PSY 001, PSY 010 or PSY 011 (or BIO 099 or STAT 071 and STAT 072). PSY 060 recommended. Co-requisite: PSY 120

PSY 122: SENSATION AND PERCEPTION, 3 credit hrs.
The senses of vision, hearing, touching, smelling, and tasting are discussed in the context of neurophysiological and cognitive mechanisms, accounting for how and why we perceive or misperceive our environments. Topics include psychophysics, signal detection, illusion and the perception of color, depth, movement, form, speech, and pain. Prereq.: PSY 001, PSY 011 (or BIO 099, or STAT 071 and 072).

PSY 123: BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR, 4 credit hrs.
A study of anatomical, physiological and biochemical correlates of behavior. Examples of topics covered include brain development and function, sensory systems, emotion, neuropsychiatric disorders, and learning and memory. With laboratory. Prereq. PSY 001 or NSCI 001, and either PSY 010 or NSCI 010.

PSY 124: HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
A thorough examination of the relationship between psychological factors and health. Topics include psychological contributions to and consequences of illness, behavioral medicine, and health promotion/disease prevention Prereq.: PSY 001.

PSY 125: COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, 4 credit hrs.
An overview of sensation, perception, thinking, memory and language. Emphasis on modern laboratory methods involving computer-controlled measurements of reaction time and brain-wave responses. With laboratory. Prereq.: PSY 001, PSY 10, and PSY 011 (or BIO 099, or STAT 071 and 072).

PSY 126: COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY, 4 credit hrs.
This course reviews the methods, research tactics, theories, and experimental data in a field of comparative psychology that studies animal cognition. Among other topics, we consider perception, spatial learning, timing and counting, social learning, imitation, self-recognition, and intentionality in animals. We focus primarily with laboratory findings, but we also consider evolutionary history of different animal species. In addition to discussing basic experimental findings concerning cognition in animals, an emphasis is placed on the logic and evidence used to justify theoretical conclusions. Includes a laboratory. Prerequisites: PSY 001, PSY 010, and PSY 011 (or BIO 099, or STAT 071 and STAT 072).

PSY 127: BEHAVIOR GENETICS, 3 credit hrs.
This course provides an overview of the field of behavior genetics, with special emphasis given to the use and interpretation of animal models in behavioral genetic research. Prereq: BIO 012 or NSCI 001. Cross listed with NSCI 127 and BIO 107.

PSY 128: HORMONES AND BEHAVIOR, 3 credit hrs.
This course examines the relationship between behavioral and hormonal systems. By drawing on examples from a variety of species, understanding modern research techniques and reading current empirical literature, this course addresses how hormones participate in sexual behavior, social behavior, social behavior, learning/memory, affective states, the stress response, and circadian rhythms, as well as other psychological and behavioral processes. Prereq.: PSY 001 or NSCI 001, and either PSY 010 or NSCI 010 or permission of instructor.

PSY 129: PRIMATE COGNITION, 3 credit hrs.
This course involves a detailed study of primate cognition, emphasizing areas such as tool manufacture and use, numerical competence, social learning, theory of mind, and language. Students learn theoretical principles of cognitive psychology and complete an applied primate language research project. Prereq: PSY 001 or BIO 098.

PSY 130: EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 4 credit hrs.
An examination of theories and multicultural research in social cognition and affect. Topics include person perception, stereotyping, prejudice, affect and the self. Includes a laboratory. Prereq: PSY 001, PSY 010, PSY 011, and PSY 030 or instructor permission.

PSY 132: THEORIES OF PERSONALITY, 3 credit hrs.
Contrasts the traditional theories of human motivation and individual differences from Freud to the present, with an emphasis on a comparative analysis of the different theories. Recent developments also are discussed. Prereq.: PSY 001, and PSY 010.

PSY 133: PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT, 4 credit hrs.
This course examines principles, methods and issues in psychological assessment to provide students with a foundation for appropriately evaluating and using various assessment techniques. Students learn general principles of reliability, validity, test bias and ethics, and explore specific applications for the assessment of characteristics such as personality, interest, aptitude and achievement. With laboratory. Prereq.: PSY 001 and PSY 011 (or BIO 099, or STAT 071 and 072). PSY 010 recommended.

PSY 134: ETHNOPOLITICAL CONFLICT, 3 credit hrs.
This course examines psychological processes involved in social conflict and peacemaking with a focus on conflict. While primarily working with social psychological theories and research, work in history, international relations, politics, science, economics, human rights, and law are included. Multiple case studies are used to illustrate principles discussed. Prerequisites: none, but PSY 030 is recommended.

PSY 137: PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER, 3 credit hrs.
A study of psychological theories and research on sex and gender. Explores the relationship of sex and gender to social and relational behavior, as well as to educational, economic, institutional and therapeutic assumptions and practices. Prereq.: PSY 001 or PSY 030. Cross-listed with WGS 160. May be used as part of Women's and Gender Studies Concentration.

PSY 142: BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS CHILD DEVELOPMENT, 3 credit hrs.
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the behavior analysis approach to child development. By the end of the course, students should understand the differences between the behavior analytic approach and other developmental system approaches and be familiar with the current literature as it relates to general areas of development (e.g., motor, social, emotional, cognitive). Prereqs.: PSY 001, PSY 042 (or EDUC 105 or EDUC 106), and PSY 060.

PSY 145: APPLIED PROFESSION ETHICS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the codes of ethics that guide the practice of psychology in clinical, applied, and research settings. Prereqs.: PSY 001, PSY 010, and junior/senior status.

PSY 148: PSYCHOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, 3 credit hrs.
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the developmental, biological, and behavioral aspects of developmental disabilities. Prereqs: PSY 001 or NSCI 001, PSY 042 (or EDUC 105 or EDUC 106).

PSY 151: HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
This course reviews the developments in classical philosophy and physiology, from the Greeks to the mid 1960's, that led to the contemporary structure of psychology. Students develop a critical appreciation of how psychology evolved by integrating classical philosophical problems with empirical and experimental perspectives rooted in the methods of physiology. Prereq.: PSY 001, PSY 010, and PSY 011 or BIO 099, or STAT 071 and STAT 072).

PSY 154: THEORIES OF CONSCIOUSNESS, 3 credit hrs.
This course pursues a multidisciplinary and multicultural study of questions regarding the nature of mind and consciousness. To this end students read and discuss current and traditional scholarly and experiential sources regarding these questions, which include approaches to understanding consciousness and theories of mind from Western sciences and humanities. Similarly, readings describing theories of mind and consciousness from selected traditional and contemporary philosophical and spiritual/psychological systems and practices developed in Eastern cultures and in North American indigenous cultures are discussed. Cross listed with HON 164.

PSY 161: COMPLEX HUMAN BEHAVIORS, 3 credit hrs.
The study of human activity from the perspective of the experimental analysis of behavior. The course considers several areas of basic research in human operant behavior, including reinforcement, stimulus control, schedule performance and verbal behavior. The implications of such research for activities such as education, job performance and leisure behavior are presented. Prereq.: PSY 060 or consent of the instructor.

PSY 162: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS, 3-4 credit hrs.
Students learn the principles and methods of applied behavior analysis and demonstrate their mastery through individual or team participation in the conduct of applied behavior analysis research projects. This includes literature review, behavioral goal setting, baseline behavioral recording, implementing behavior change strategies and project evaluation. Prereq.: PSY 060.

PSY 176: ADVANCED PSYCHOPATHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
A descriptive survey of major classifications of behavior disorders, emphasizing principles of diagnosis, theories of etiology, and therapeutic approaches. Prereq.: PSY 001, PSY 010 and PSY 011 and PSY 076.

PSY 177: FUNDAMENTALS OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
Examines the fundamental principles of clinical psychology and the application of the principles. Topics include the development of empirically-supported psychotherapy interventions, sub-fields within the discipline, and ethical issues involved in clinical psychology. The history of the discipline as well as contemporary trends are discussed. The integration of clinical science and practice from applied and theoretical perspectives is emphasized. Prereq: PSY 001 and PSY 010 and junior standing.

PSY 182: PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT, 3 credit hrs.
The application of the principles and techniques of behavior modification to the performance of individuals in organizations. On-the-job training, productivity and retention are emphasized. Students acquire practical knowledge of these principles through readings, class discussions and the completion of a project. Prereq.: PSY 001 or consent of instructor.

PSY 183: INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 3 credit hrs.
The application of psychological principles to the development of personnel procedures. Topics include job analysis, job evaluation, recruitment, selection and promotion,  employee development, and performance appraisal. Prereqs.: PSY 001 and PSY 011 (or BIO 099, or STAT 071 and STAT 072).

PSY 190-191: INDEPENDENT STUDY, 1-3 credit hrs.
Directed independent study. Prereq.: Nine hours of psychology and written consent of instructor.

PSY 190C-191C: INDEPENDENT STUDY CAPSTONE, 3 credit hrs.
Independent psychological research project that culminates in a formal research paper or presentation. Prereq: Junior standing as a psychology major, 22 credit hours in psychology preparatory courses, and approval of the faculty supervisor and department chair.

PSY 192: INTERNSHIP, 1-3 credit hrs.
Students work in an applied setting, such as a mental health facility, where they develop skills learned in psychology courses. Prereq: Junior standing as a psychology major, 12 credit hours in psychology coursework including preparatory courses, 2.80 grade point average, and approval of the faculty internship supervisor. May be taken only once.

PSY 192C: INTERNSHIP CAPSTONE, 3 credit hrs.
Students work in an applied setting where they develop skills learned in psychology courses and complete a comprehensive research project, relating internship activities to an area of knowledge in psychology. Prereq: Junior standing as a psychology major, 22 credit hours in psychology coursework including preparatory courses, 2.80 grade point average, and approval of the faculty internship supervisor and department chair.

PSY 194: TRAVEL STUDY SEMINAR, 1-6 credit hrs.
This course connects significant domestic and/or international travel with other types of learning experiences in psychology such as pre- and post-trip reading assignments, lectures at Drake and during travel, formal and informal discussion, and written research projects. The travel component of the course serves as a naturalistic and experiential laboratory for the course.

PSY 195: TOPIC SEMINAR, 1-4 credit hrs.
A variable topics course designed to examine advanced topics of contemporary significance in psychology. Prereq.: PSY 001, PSY 010 and PSY 011 (or BIO 099 or STAT 071 and STAT 072).

PSY 196: SERVICE LEARNING SEMINAR, 1-4 credit hrs.
Through service to community-based organizations, students explore how psychological principles learned via formal instruction apply to target populations. The nature of the organizations and the target populations will vary. Prereq: PSY 001.

PSY 197: TOPICAL SEMINAR, 3 credit hrs.
Consideration of contemporary problems in psychology. Prereq.: PSY 001, PSY 010 and PSY 011 (or BIO 099 or STAT 071 and STAT 072) and a minimum 2.00 grade point average.

PSY 198: RESEARCH SEMINAR, 1-3 credit hrs.
Participation in a scientific research project. Prereq: PSY 001, PSY 010, PSY 011 (or BIO 099. or STAT 071 and STAT 072) and instructor permission.

Neuroscience Courses

NSCI 001: INTRODUCTION TO NEUROSCIENCE, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores the core concepts of the interdisciplinary field of neuroscience. Emphasis is placed on cellular mechanisms, neurotransmission, human brain anatomy, sensory physiology, the motor system, emotion, sleep, cognitive neuroscience, and psychopathology. Although a comparative perspective is taken, human neuroscience is emphasized. This course serves as preparation for many advanced neuroscience courses.

NSCI 010: RESEARCH METHODS IN NEUROSCIENCE, 3 credit hrs.
An overview of current methodologies used to study neural processes and behavior. Topics include electrophysiology, neuroanatomy, stereology, cellular and molecular neuroscience, genetic manipulations, and imaging approaches. Prereq: NSCI 001.

NSCI 090/091: INDEPENDENT STUDY, 1 to 3 credit hrs.
Directed independent study that introduces students to techniques and skills that are necessary to conduct advanced research (NSCI 190/191).

NSCI 095: SPECIAL TOPICS IN NEUROSCIENCE, 1 to 4 credit hrs.
This is a special topics course in neuroscience designed to introduce students to a specific area of neuroscience. Prereq.: NSCI 001, NSCI 010, or permission of instructor.

NSCI 127: BEHAVIOR GENETICS, 3 credit hrs.
This course provides an overview of the field of behavior genetics, with special emphasis given to the use and interpretation of animal models in behavioral genetic research. Prereq: Bio 12 or NSCI 001. Cross listed with PSY 127 and BIO 107.

NSCI 190: INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NEUROSCIENCE, 1 to 3 credit hrs.
Students actively participate in the design, execution, analysis, or interpretation of research relevant to neuroscience. The specific content of the course varies with the student and instructor. The workload depends on the number of credit hours for which the student has enrolled, but corresponds to the University guideline of approximately 3 hours per week per credit hour enrolled. Prereq.: Nine hours of psychology, biology, neuroscience, or any combination of these, and written consent of instructor.

NSCI 190C: INDEPENDENT STUDY CAPSTONE, 3 credit hrs.
An independent neuroscience research project that culminates in a formal research paper or presentation. Prereq: Junior standing as a neuroscience major, 22 credit hours in neuroscience major coursework including preparatory courses, and approval of the faculty supervisor and department chair. Prereq: Junior standing as a neuroscience major, 22 credit hours in neuroscience coursework including preparatory courses, and approval of the faculty supervisor and department chair.

NSCI 191: INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NEUROSCIENCE, 1 to 3 credit hrs.
Students actively participate in the design, execution, analysis, or interpretation of research relevant to neuroscience. The specific content of the course varies with the student and instructor. The workload depends on the number of credit hours for which the student has enrolled, but corresponds to the University guideline of approximately 3 hours per week per credit hour enrolled. Prereq.: Nine hours of psychology, biology, neuroscience, or any combination of these, and written consent of instructor.

NSCI 191C: INDEPENDENT STUDY CAPSTONE, 3 credit hrs.
An independent neuroscience research project that culminates in a formal research paper or presentation. Prereq: Junior standing as a neuroscience major, 22 credit hours in neuroscience coursework including preparatory courses, and approval of the faculty supervisor and department chair.

NSCI 192: INTERNSHIP, 1 to 3 credit hrs.
Students work in an applied setting where they develop skills learned in neuroscience. Prereq: Junior standing as a neuroscience major or minor, 12 credit hours in neuroscience major courses including preparatory courses, 2.80 grade point average, and approval of the faculty internship supervisor and department chair.

NSCI 192C: INTERNSHIP CAPSTONE, 3 credit hrs.
Students work in an applied setting where they develop skills learned in neuroscience and complete a comprehensive research project relating the internship activity to an area of knowledge in neuroscience. Prereq: Junior standing as a neuroscience major, 22 credit hours in neuroscience major courses including preparatory courses, 2.80 grade point average, and approval of the faculty internship supervisor and department chair.

NSCI 195: SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR, 1 to 4 credit hrs.
A variable topics course designed to introduce students to advanced topics of contemporary significance in neuroscience. Course credit varies with extensiveness of topic. Prereq: NSCI 001, NSCI 010, or PSY 011 (or BIO 099 or STAT 071 and STAT 072) or permission of instructor.

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