Courses

LPS 001: INTRO LAW, POLITICS, AND SOCIETY, 3 credit hrs.
Introduction to the systems, practices, and intersections of law, politics, and society, as well as the various scholarly approaches to the study of those systems, practices, and interactions.

LPS 002: CRITICAL CONCEPTS IN LPS, 3 credit hrs.
In this course, students will be introduced to the critical concepts underpinning the study of Law, Politics, and Society. Students will engage in learning about concepts such as ideology, justice and injustice, jurisprudence, globalization, inequality and equality, community, authority, legitimacy, and individualism. Students will also engage in the study of concepts key to understanding the workings of the major; they will learn about intentional interdisciplinarity, critical analysis, the perceived "law/politics divide," comparative and historical research, and the idea of paradigmatic transition.

LPS 035: SPECIAL TOPICS IN LPS (Lower Division), 3 credit hrs.
Units of study focusing on introduction to special topics, debates, and issues within the field of Law, Politics, and Society.

LPS 040: PUBLIC TRIALS, 3 credit hrs.
This introductory course examines widely reported and sensational trials as public performances of law. The course considers such trials as a significant form of public discourse by studying controversies surrounding the reporting and representation of trials, issues that arise in and through popular trials, as well as the dynamics of the trials themselves. In a broad sense, the course is about the meanings of law in American society and about the definitions of American society revealed in legal disputes.

LPS 100: LPS PERSPECTIVES IN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW, 3 credit hrs.
This course uses case law as a jumping off point for the application of interdisciplinary knowledge. In it, students examine particular strands of United States constitutional law, using historical, journalistic, political science, sociological, and other disciplinary modes to understand the development of doctrine over time, and the impact of law on public life. Required for majors.

LPS 135: SPECIAL TOPICS IN LPS, 3 credit hrs.
Units of study focusing on special topics, debates, and issues within the field of Law, Politics, and Society. Prereq.: LPS 001 or permission of instructor.

LPS 138: REPRODUCTIVE LAW AND POLITICS IN U.S., 3 credit hrs.
This course will introduce students to the case law, national politics, and grassroots movements surrounding a number of issues within "reproductive politics" in the United States. It focuses on the nature of the debate, and asks if there are issues around which people may find agreement, particular voices that have not been heard, and policies that have not been explored.

LPS 145: SPECIAL TOPICS (INTERNATIONAL FOCUS), 3 credit hrs.
Units of study focusing primarily on international and global aspects of special topics, debates, and issues within the field of Law, Politics, and Society.

LPS 146: URBANIZATION AND SOCIAL JUSTICE, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores several facets of the complex relationship between law and geography, with an emphasis on how each can shape the other. The course looks at the ways that law shapes geography, and at the geographic assumptions inherent in the law. It examines the ways in which different sorts of regulation relate to one another, and how those relationships play out through physical space. In particular, it examines questions of sovereignty and the ways in which sovereignty relates to questions of rights, crime, and exclusion. Along the way, it explores the role of information regulation, different legal frameworks, and jurisdiction.

LPS 148: WAR CRIMES AND BEYOND, 3 credit hrs.
This course explores the relationship between law and society through the lens of international criminal law. International criminal law is fundamentally different from criminal law at the domestic level because it requires many more people-- from different countries--to define what it means. Some crimes, like genocide and war crimes, have been agreed upon for centuries but still face problems of enforcement. Other crimes, such as aggression and terrorism, are still not clearly defined at the international level, making enforcement all the more difficult. Therefore, a good section of the course will be devoted to exploring the politics of international legal negotiations, particularly in the context of the International Criminal Court. In addition to the ICC, the class will focus its attention on a number of specific country situations, explored both through class readings and through student projects, as well as different methods of seeking justice for these sorts of crimes once they happen.

LPS 190: SENIOR SEMINAR, 3 credit hrs.
This class is an introduction to the study of law as a political process, as well as an economic, social, and political resource. We will use a comparative, case-study method to examine activists' use of litigation, and mobilization of rights and legal discourses, as well as the relationship between law and social policy. We will learn to apply methods of jurisprudence and legal theory in order to evaluate judicial decision-making on controversial topics. In addition, the materials in this class will open onto an exploration of legal structures and institutions. We will investigate the legal stragegies of several types of social movement activism, including: the Civil Rights and Feminisit Movements, the foundations of American Indian Law, and class action suits to protect citizens from environmental pollutants. Using these topics as jumping-off points, we will also examine structural issues such as jury selection, judicial appointments, and the role of the state and government attorneys in creating social change through litigation. This course is required of LPS majors and also counts as an Engaged Citizen AOI.

LPS 199: DIRECTED RESEARCH AND READING IN LPS, 3 credit hrs.
This course enables students to engage in directed reading and research in the field of Law, Politics, and Society. Supervised by faculty in the major.

Art Sci Events
September 6, 2014
09:00 AM - 12:00 PM
September 18, 2014
07:00 PM - 08:30 PM
October 9, 2014
07:00 PM - 08:30 PM
ArtSci News
July 11, 2014
The Environmental Education Summer Workshop for Teachers—co-sponsored by Drake University, MetroWaste Authority, and Prairie City-Monroe (PCM) School District—is designed to expose educators to a wide range of experiences connecting the natural history of Iowa’s plants and animals to problem-based learning exercises that address both science and math standards.
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