Glenn McKnight

Associate Professor of History
Department Chair
Office Location: 221B Meredith Hall

Glenn McKnight teaches various topics in sub-Saharan African history, as well as classes in world history and Atlantic slavery. He focuses his research on the history of development policy in sub-Saharan Africa. In this, he uses historical case studies to critique current theories and practices of development. He has published numerous articles drawing on various case studies from Uganda and, with Jeff Grischow, on Ghana. His most recent article, "Harry Johnston’s New Boot: The Uganda Agreement and Ideas of Development," was published in the Journal of Historical Sociology 26(2)(2013). He is currently working on a revisionist study of the origins of the British system of Indirect Rule in Africa.

McKnight’s interest and experience in Uganda has opened the opportunity to take Drake students to Uganda for short-term study programs around the concept of Sustainable Development in Africa. He and colleagues from the College of Business and Public Administration have worked together over the past 12 years to develop partnerships with various Ugandan institutions and people that provide Drake students with the chance to experience life in Uganda, develop relationships, work on service learning projects, all while studying sustainable development. He and his colleagues published an article, "Overcoming Challenges from Running a Faculty-Led Short-term Study Experience in sub-Saharan Africa: Case Study Uganda" based on their experience building this program in International Business Research, Teaching and Practice, 7(1)(2013).

Hailing from north of the border, he completed an M.A. at Concordia University (Montreal) and a Ph.D. in History at Queen’s University (Kingston) before taking his current position at Drake in 1997. He enjoys spending time with his wife and three kids, playing disc golf, being involved in the community life of his church, and making sure he has enough firewood for the next winter.

ArtSci News
October 20, 2016
The Comparison Project will present the third event in its 2016–2017 series on death and dying. A community interfaith dialogue on Oct. 27 will feature representatives of three different refugee religions in Des Moines.