Skip Sub Menu

Course Descriptions C-D

Course Credit Information

A – Usually offered during alternate years
CR/NC – Credit if course is passed; no credit if course is not passed
N – Not regularly offered
S – May be offered as a seminar
2-3 – Credit may vary between 2 and 3 credits
SK – Skills course
DL - Distance learning
*New course

280. CHILDREN AND THE LAW. 2-3
This course explores issues involving children's rights, constitutional limitations on parental rights, child abuse and neglect, placement issues, termination of parental rights, legal representation of children, evidentiary issues in juvenile court hearings, and juvenile delinquency.

504. CHILDREN RIGHTS CLINIC I. 4 SK
The Children's Rights Clinic is a semester-long course in which students have the opportunity to engage in children’s rights advocacy, including direct representation of children in administrative, school disciplinary, and juvenile court proceedings. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students will be responsible for all aspects of representing their clients, including interviewing and counseling clients, engaging in fact investigation, conducting legal research, negotiating with the opposing party, drafting litigation documents, and appearing in juvenile court or other adjudicative bodies.
Additionally, students will participate in a community education project or support an advocacy effort aimed at improving outcomes for children. Through case rounds, a mandatory weekly seminar, and their case and project work, clinic students learn to work collaboratively, practice self-regulated learning and self-reflection, synthesize facts and legal principles, and develop transferrable lawyering skills.

Prerequisites: Evidence (Law 113) and Ethics and Professional Responsibility (Law 114). Limited to students who are eligible to receive a student practice license in Iowa.

505. CHILDREN'S RIGHTS CLINIC II. 2-4 SK
Students who have successfully completed the Children's Rights Clinic I (LAW 504)
may take this course with faculty permission to continue work in the Children’s Rights
Clinic for an additional semester.

Prerequisite: Children's Rights Clinic I (LAW 504) [Enrollment by permission only]

622. CHILDREN'S RIGHTS CENTER INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/F
Students in this course will work on a variety of projects for the Drake Middleton Center for Children's Rights. Projects could include research and writing on topics of juvenile law, production of educational materials, work on the center website materials, etc.

102. CIVIL PROCEDURE (I) CONSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK. 3
An examination of the legal process and the adversary system at work in civil controversies. The emphasis is on proper selection of the forum in which to proceed and the source of the law to be applied. The course covers the values of procedure, including fairness of the process to the litigants, efficiency, and the desirability of and need for conclusively resolving disputes.

103. CIVIL PROCEDURE (II) PROCESS OF LITIGATION. 3
Course focuses on the phases of a civil lawsuit, including pleading by the parties, joinder of parties and claims, discovery and preparation for trial, devices for resolving disputes without trial, burdens of proof, instructions, verdicts, and post-trial motions.

299. CLIMATE LAW & POLICY*. 3
Global climate change has quickly become one of the most pressing social, environmental, and economic challenges confronting the global community. This proposed three-credit class will explore the legal and political challenges involved in addressing and responding to climate change.

324. COMPARATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 2-3 S
This seminar examines the constitutional systems of other nations, and compares them with constitutional law in the United States. It will focus predominantly on examining diverse approaches to judicial review and to rights questions. Students can satisfy the advanced writing requirement.

803. COMPARATIVE INTERNATIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE. 3
*This course is for Master of Jurisprudince students only*
This three (3) credit course addresses foundational principles of administrative law in select international locations and compares them to American administrative law procedures. Students will take a comparative approach to the staples of administrative legal procedures as they exist in various jurisdictions. Students will look at decision-making procedures that guide commercial operations and learn research methods to identify key risks associated with operating abroad. Students will learn how to create, implement and maintain a dynamic compliance program that meets standards set by international treatises and sovereign governments. Throughout the online modules, students will apply lessons learned to real-world dilemmas encountered by organizations engaging in business abroad.

802. THE LAW OF COMPLIANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT. 3 (Law Students Only)
This course covers the various legal issues that are handled by compliance professionals, such as regulatory and statutory compliance, supervision and enforcement, avoiding illegal activity, identifying and dealing with wrongdoing and corruption, conducting internal investigations, information security and ethical considerations.  Topics include development of compliance processes and controls, the role of various compliance professionals in organizations, internal investigations and processes, and external examination, such as supervision and enforcement.

802G. THE LAW OF COMPLIANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT. 3 (MJ and LLM only)
This course covers the various legal issues that are handled by compliance professionals, such as regulatory and statutory compliance, supervision and enforcement, avoiding illegal activity, identifying and dealing with wrongdoing and corruption, conducting internal investigations, information security and ethical considerations.  Topics include development of compliance processes and controls, the role of various compliance professionals in organizations, internal investigations and processes, and external examination, such as supervision and enforcement.

239. CONFLICT OF LAWS. 3
A study of the problems that inevitably arise in a multi-sovereign community. The course examines horizontal choice of law, the constitutional restraints imposed on choice of law and state court jurisdiction, and the recognition of sister state judgments.

099. CONSTITUTIONAL CONTROVERSIES. 1
This class will introduce students to the fundamental principles of the U.S. Constitution by focusing on one or two of the most controversial topics in the news related to constitutional law. This could include freedom of religion, affirmative action, hate speech, different concepts of justice, whether the constitution’s meaning can change over time, and other subjects. It will also provide key background on historical events relevant to the constitution’s interpretation, such as the Civil War and the constitutional amendments that followed (the Reconstruction Amendments), the significance of cases such as Brown v. Board of Education, and the powerful role of the U.S. Supreme Court in American history. Further, the class will briefly discuss constitutional developments across the globe that are of interest in the U.S.

274. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY. 3
This course examines the Constitutional History of the United States from the American Revolution through the Civil War and Reconstruction Era. It covers the major constitutional debates of the 1700s and most of the 1800s as well as the political and social developments that shaped those debates. The course begins by examining the historical antecedents and political controversies that influenced the text and structure of the document written in Philadelphia in 1787 and ratified by the states in 1788. It then focuses on changes in the text of the Constitution (in the form of Constitutional Amendments) as well as shifts in the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the Constitution’s meaning. The course pays particular attention to the Constitutional revolution of the Civil War Era, which gave rise to three Constitutional amendments. The course’s central purpose is to enhance students’ understanding of modern Constitutional Law by grounding their understanding of current constitutional debates within a broader historical context.

112. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I. 3
An analysis of the U.S. Constitution as a structuring factor in American government, including the processes of the Supreme Court and other federal courts, the balance of powers within the federal government, the relationship between the federal government and the states, and an introduction to due process under the 14th Amendment as a federal control on state action.

115. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II. 3
Course focuses on the protection of individual rights. The 14th Amendment's equal protection and due process clauses and the First Amendment's guarantees to freedom of expression, association, and religion receive intensive analysis. Congress' ability to create additional statutory protections pursuant to the post-Civil War amendments is also explored.

330. CONSTITUTIONAL LITIGATION. 2-3 A S
An analysis of the most frequently utilized federal civil rights statute—42 U.S. Section 1983—the procedural or remedial device through which a person may seek relief for the deprivation of federal constitutional rights. The course covers the crucial litigation and quasi-jurisdictional issues regularly encountered in constitutional litigation, including the 11th Amendment, qualified and absolute immunity, exhaustion, and the various remedies available to redress constitutional violations. The 42 U.S. Sections 1981, 1982, and 1985 may also be covered.

610. CONSUMER LAW INTERNSHIP. 3 CR/F
Students serve a semester-long internship with either the Consumer Protection Division of the Iowa Attorney General's Office or the Regulatory Counsel’s Office of the Iowa Credit Union League. Students will gain experience and insight as to the state and federal compliance laws impacting credit unions, how credit unions manage consumer compliance requirements (and work with third party consultants to do so), and where the relevant federal agency is focusing in the future relative to consumer regulation of financial institutions. Prerequisites for the course include permission by faculty supervisor and approval by the field supervisor in the Iowa Attorney General's Office or Iowa Credit Union League.

298. CONSUMER PROTECTION*. 3
A study of the fundamentals of the law surrounding everyday consumer transactions such as the buying and selling of goods and services like mortgages, cars, appliances, and education. The class will explore many facets of consumer protection law including common law, state statutes, and federal regulations. Such consumer problems as warranty, deceptive trade practices, holder in due course, credit collection practices, credit disclosures, and adhesive contractual provisions are explored.

109. CONTRACTS I. 2
In this two-course progression, students learn the basics of the law of contracts. The courses examine contract formation, enforceability, breach, damages, and alternative theories of recovery.

110. CONTRACTS II. 3
This spring semester course is a continuation of the course of study undertaken in Contracts I (LAW 109).

326. CONTRACT DRAFTING. 2-3 SK
This course engages students in the practical experience of drafting contacts in the context of client representation. The focus is on developing the knowledge and skills to translate client interests into comprehensive contract terms. Through classroom discussion and writing assignments, students develop and practice drafting and learn the concepts of clear expressive writing of contracts. Prerequisites: Contracts I and II (LAW 109 and 110) and Civil Procedure I and II (LAW 102 and 103).

227. COPYRIGHT LAW. 3
This course covers the basic principles and policies of copyright law, including what materials are protected, the substantive requirements for protection, the procedures for obtaining protection, rights conferred, and remedies for infringement. The course also examines the role of copyright within the larger context of intellectual property law and policy—both domestic and international.

108. CRIMINAL LAW. 3
Course covers the substantive law of crimes and criminal responsibility—emphasizing criminal law theory and its application—against a background of procedural and enforcement problems.

502. CRIMINAL DEFENSE CLINIC. 4-6 CR/F SK
This program allows students to experience criminal law work. Students begin by representing clients through the arraignment process, then over the semester advance to representing clients in hearings, depositions, negotiations, and trials, including possible jury trials. As with other clinical programs, student attorneys have primary responsibility for their clients. In addition, students participate in weekly classes and case rounds. Limited to students who have completed three semesters or more of law school who are eligible to receive a student practice license.

319D. CRIMINAL MOTIONS PRACTICUM 3 SK, DL
Advanced study in criminal law issues through moot court adversary presentations of written motions and oral argument. Prerequisite: Criminal Procedure I (LAW 236).  This is a hybrid course that will be partially taught online and in the classroom.

236. CRIMINAL PROCEDURE INVESTIGATION. 3
A detailed exploration of criminal practice and procedure in its various phases, including search and seizure, arrest, bail, right to counsel, self incrimination, plea bargains, grand jury, exclusionary rules, and trial rights. Includes some discussion of current theories of administration of criminal law.

238. CRIMINAL PROCEDURE ADJUDICATION. 3
Covers prosecution and adjudication, including bail and pretrial release, discovery by defendants and the government, grand jury presentations, dismissal of indictments, joinder and severance of defendants and charges, plea bargaining, right to trial by jury, withdrawal by or disqualification of counsel, and sentencing.

331. CURRENT ISSUES IN FOOD AND AGRICULTURE. 3 S
This is an upper-level course that provides an overview of current issues facing the food, agriculture and biofuel industries.  The course will focus on both domestic and international issues, including litigation concerns, trade barriers, and developing/current policy issues.  These are the key concerns that practicing lawyers, in law firms and in the private sector, are dealing with as they look at current needs and long-term planning of their clients and employers.  They are also the same issues that those in the regulatory industry are dealing with on a daily basis.  We will look at these issues from the viewpoint of a practitioner, focusing on developing the skills required to deal with a series of substantive issues surrounding litigation and regulation within these industries.

634. DISABILITY RIGHTS IOWA. 2-3 CR/F
Students will have the opportunity to work on a variety of disability law projects at Disability Rights Iowa, with a focus on the legal rights of children with disabilities. Students will interview potential clients, assist with monitoring restraint and seclusion practices at juvenile facilities, and do legal research and writing in support of litigation at DRI.

279. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. 3
This course is designed to provide legal and social science perspectives on the issues lawyers are likely to face in domestic violence cases. Topics to be covered include research on the dynamics of abuse, cultural differences, and special populations; investigation, prosecution, defense strategies, and sentencing; civil protective orders and domestic violence shelters; and the federal Violence Against Women Act.

 
Law School News