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Course Descriptions G-J

Course Credit Information

A – Usually offered during alternate years
CR/NC – Credit if course is passed; no credit if course is not passed
N – Not regularly offered
S – May be offered as a seminar
2-3 – Credit may vary between 2 and 3 credits
SK – Skills course
*New course

206. GAMING LAW. 3
This course introduces students to the law of the rapidly growing area of gambling. Areas of study include determining whether an act constitutes gambling; the social harms of gambling; the licensing and regulatory processes of gaming; private law issues in gambling such as contracts; and the enforcement of judgments, tribal gaming, pari-mutual gaming, state lotteries, sports betting, and poker. The class will also meet with state gaming regulatory officials.

501. GENERAL CIVIL PRACTICE CLINIC. 4-6 CR/F SK
In this clinical program, students represent clients who could not otherwise afford legal assistance. Clinic student attorneys take primary responsibility for their clients in cases involving civil matters. They conduct intakes, interviews, and fact investigations; draft legal documents; handle negotiations; and represent clients in court hearings and trials, including jury trials. In addition, students participate in case selection and in weekly classes. Students also are required to attend a two-day, pre-semester orientation. Limited to students who have completed three semesters or more of law school and are eligible to receive a student practice license.

205. HEALTH CARE LAW & ETHICS. 3
This introductory course examines a variety of legal issues relating to health care quality, cost, access, reimbursement, organization, and finance. Special attention will be given to definitional approaches to sickness, health, and quality in health care; mechanisms for maintaining and improving the quality of health care, including provider self-regulation, professional licensure, credentialing, certification, accreditation, government regulation, and the tort system; access to health care, the physician-hospital relationship; physician peer review issues, private health insurance and public health care programs, health care organization issues, and health care antitrust issues. Students who take this course will be prepared to represent individual and institutional health care providers and commercial and public payors in civil, criminal, and administrative proceedings.

288. HEALTH BUSINESS LAW, LITIGATION & COMPLIANCE. 3
This course provides an overview of the primary areas of business law and compliance of interest to health care organizations. Students will consider a wide variety of source materials including case law, government directives, industry reports, and guest speakers. They will also participate in a realistic pre-trial health law simulation, in which they will practice client in-take, draft and respond to requests for production, develop interrogatories, depose witnesses, and advise clients.

561. HOLOCAUST AND THE LAW:From Democracy to Dictatorship and Beyond. 2
This course grows out of the rapid internationalization of domestic law over the last decade, especially in civil litigation before U.S. courts. The course will examine some of the recurring issues that arise when foreign parties sue or are sued in U.S. courts. Topics studied include personal jurisdiction, forum selection, service of process, choice of law, conducting discovery abroad, foreign sovereign immunity, anti-suit injunctions, and recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. The topics should be accessible to first-year students who have just completed Civil Procedure I and II.

621. HONORS JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP. 6 CR/F
Student interns learn about the state (appellate) and federal (trial and appellate) judicial decision-making process through work with a federal trial or appellate judge, a justice of the Iowa Supreme Court, or the highest state appellate court. Prerequisites: A minimum of 3.0 GPA and 45 credits completed, a demonstrated commitment to scholarship (through participation in a law journal, significant research for faculty for publication, judicial internship, etc.), a strong academic record, a faculty recommendation, and approval of the Judicial Internship Director and the associate dean.

263. IMMIGRATION LAW. 3 A
Topics include regulation of family and employment-based immigration and deportation of criminal aliens.

600. INDEPENDENT INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/F
Student arranges a one-time internship with a government institution or nonprofit organization that permits the student to perform lawyering skills under the direction and supervision of a faculty member and a supervising attorney. Approval of the associate dean is required.

615. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH. 1-3 CR/NC
An opportunity to engage in advanced research and writing. The subject of the research, the nature and quantity of the work required, and the number of credits awarded are determined by the supervising professor. Not intended as a substitute for offered courses. Students may credit LAW 615 only once toward the hours needed for graduation.


260. INSURANCE LAW. 3
Subjects include the insurance contract and its interpretation; life, casualty, and liability insurance; selection and control of risks; claims adjustment; and regulation of the insurance industry.

282. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (INTRODUCTION TO). 3
This is a survey course covering the core areas of intellectual property: patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret (and other state intellectual property-related areas of law). It introduces each subject and explores commonalities and differences among different systems of intellectual property protection. The course can be taken by a nonspecialist interested in learning about the field, or as a segue to Drake Law School's more detailed course offerings, including Copyright Law, Patent Law, Patent Office Practice, and Trademarks and Unfair Competition Law.

277. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LICENSING. 2
This course will focus on the licensing of intellectual property, primarily patents, and tangible property, but also touch on trademarks and copyrights. The course will emphasize various terms that should be considered in license agreements and the negotiation perspectives of licensors and licensees. Students will also be exposed to the concepts of technology transfer and management of intellectual property. The course will utilize a textbook, handouts, and representative license agreements. Students will be required to engage in the consideration and drafting of license terms. There will be no final exam. Grades will be based on assignments and a final project. Co-requisites: Copyright (LAW 227), Patents (LAW 228), Trademarks (LAW 271), or Intro to Intellectual Property (LAW 282).

215. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LITIGATION. 3 A
Course examines litigation involving intellectual property assets. Material includes both skill development and theory. Students prepare complaints and pre-trial motions, examine the philosophy behind decisions to use certain types of motions, learn the pitfalls and proper methods of preparing witnesses for deposition and trial, and practice effective closing arguments. Prerequisites: Patent Law (LAW 228), and Trademarks (LAW 271), and Copyrights (LAW 227), or Intro to Intellectual Property (LAW 282). Recommended prerequisite: Federal Jurisdiction (LAW 235).

310. INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS. 3
Seminar examines international human rights law and the measures taken to effect human rights compliance. Topics include the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Bill of Rights, genocide, race and gender discrimination, and the relative importance of "second generation" economic, social, and cultural rights, in addition to the more traditional political rights. Case studies include the conflicts in the Middle East, human rights in China and the Islamic world, and the debate over "third generation" human rights, such as the rights to sustainable development and a healthy environment.

262. INTERNATIONAL TRADE. 3
An overview of the global trading system governed and administered under the World Trade Organization (WTO) charter. Topics include globalization and its impact, the classification and regulation of imports and exports, how the WTO dispute settlement system works, and the roles played by international organizations like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in promoting worldwide economic development.

295. INTERNET LAW. 2
Technology and innovation have facilitated significant changes in business and community paradigms. Emerging issues created by the advent of things like social media, virtual worlds, 3-D printing, and digital assets have raised novel legal questions that, in many instances, have not been well-anticipated by existing legal structures. This interactive course will explore a broad range of matters related to innovation, Internet ubiquity, and how the law either facilitates or hinders advancement. Course coverage will include topics like digital discovery, domain names, information security, access to technology, virtual worlds, privacy, social networking, e-commerce, 3-D printing, and biotechnology and bioscience. The course’s content will be updated as issues emerge. There are no prerequisites for this course and a technical background is not required.

099. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONALISM. 2
The course is designed to introduce students to the key principles that underpin American Constitutionalism. The course has three principal objectives. The first is explain the basic principles of the Constitution. The second is to explain key lines of judicial doctrine and how they have changed over time. The third is to teach students how to read constitutional law cases. The course, in short, will introduce students to the Constitution and to constitutional law.

221. INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE LAW. 3
A general survey of the legal problems of agriculture that serves as a thorough introduction to the study of agricultural law. Course focuses on various areas of law that directly affect the operation of the farm business and includes a review of selected regulatory programs. Discussion includes an analysis of the impact that law and government regulation have on agricultural production, distribution, and marketing.

282. INTRODUCTION TO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY. 3
This is a survey course covering the core areas of intellectual property: patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret (and other state intellectual property-related areas of law). It introduces each subject and explores commonalities and differences among different systems of intellectual property protection. The course can be taken by a nonspecialist interested in learning about the field, or as a segue to Drake Law School's more detailed course offerings, including Copyright Law, Patent Law, Patent Office Practice, and Trademarks and Unfair Competition Law.

259. INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL LAW. 3
An analysis of basic concepts in public international law, including the nature of the international legal system and its institutions such as the United Nations and the World Court, the sources of international law, states and recognition, jurisdiction, nationality, human rights, the use of force and the laws of war, outer space, and jurisdictional immunities.

100. INTRODUCTION TO LAW. 0
A brief introduction to legal studies as a part of the Law School's orientation for new students. Material covered includes significance of precedent, the judicial function, and jurisprudential concepts as applied to the problems of rights in conflict.

630. IOWA ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OFFICE INTERNSHIP. 3 CR/F
Students are placed in the Division of Criminal Appeals in the Iowa Attorney General’s Office to develop skills in the area of criminal appellate practice. The internship allows students the opportunity to participate in all stages of appellate practice, from briefing on motions for interlocutory appeals to the potential for arguing appellate cases at the Iowa Court of Appeals or Iowa Supreme Court. Students may not work in the Criminal Defense Clinic or Appellate Clinic at the same time as this internship. Students who have performed any criminal defense work in a private firm must perform a conflicts check and make appropriate arrangements to avoid ethical conflicts. Students must have completed Evidence (LAW 113) and Criminal Procedure I (LAW 236) prior to enrollment.

605. IOWA CIVIL RIGHTS COMMISSION INTERNSHIP. 3 CR/F
Students investigate actual claimants. Students will typically screen eight to ten cases and write up a proposed disposition. Students can only enroll with the permission of the instructor, who communicates the Law School's and the Iowa Civil Rights Commission's (ICRC) expectations as to both the quantity and quality of the work. Students need 45 hours of work for each hour of credit. Course is graded CR/F.

602. IOWA LEGAL AID INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/F
Students serve as interns with Iowa Legal Aid.  Iowa Legal Aid is a nonprofit organization providing critical legal assistance to low-income and vulnerable Iowans who have nowhere else to turn. Students will participate in all stages of case intake and development including: client intake and counseling, document drafting and filing, hearings, and trials under the supervision of an Iowa Legal Aid Attorney.  Students need 45 hours of a work for each hour of course credit.  Students may have the opportunity to represent clients under the Iowa student practice rule.

 640. IOWA PUBLIC INFORMATION BOARD INTERNSHIP (IPIB). 3 CR/F
The Iowa Public Information Board is a nine-member board appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate. It is an independent agency of state government. The mission of the IPIB is to enforce Iowa's open meetings and public records laws. The internship entails working directly with the board's deputy director on research, writing, and investigative projects in support of the board's activities. The intern will also attend board meetings and hearings. Prior coursework in administrative law and/or state and local government law is strongly encouraged.

642. IOWA SECRETARY of STATE INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/F
The internship consists of legal research and writing projects conducted by the intern in support of the Iowa Secretary of State’s Office. The research topics will include: legislative proposals, administrative rulemaking, practical application of Iowa election code, election case law reviews, and compliance with federal laws. The intern may also attend meetings between the Elections Divisions and legislators, other state and local government agencies, and outside groups. Other duties include responding to constituent inquiries and performing general legal research.

618. IOWA SUPREME COURT SCHOLAR RESEARCH OPPORTUNITY. 3 CR/F
One third-year student will be selected for academic year residence at the Iowa Judicial Branch Building, co-authoring a law review article with an Iowa Supreme Court Justice.  The research commitment extends over the entire academic year (fall/spring); however, credit for all hours will be given in the spring semester.  Criteria for selection is as follows: A demonstrated commitment to scholarship (through participation in a law journal, significant research for faculty for publication, judicial internship, etc.), strong academic record, and faculty recommendations.  Students should apply through the Associate Dean's office.  This course is CR/F.

623. JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/F
Students serve as judicial law clerks or as interns with public officials in a faculty-supervised program. Summer placement with federal and state judges—in other jurisdictions as well as in Iowa—is frequently arranged. Placement is at the discretion of the faculty supervisor after the student has completed no fewer than 30 hours of law school work with a minimum 2.3 cumulative grade point average.

323. JUSTICE REFORM AND INNOVATION 2.
This seminar focuses on cutting-edge innovations and reforms in both the civil and criminal justice systems in both state and federal courts. Topics include, e.g.,  mass incarceration and sentencing reform, civil jury trial innovations, Afrocentric facial feature bias and implicit bias, and the use of technology in evidence presentation.

631. JUVENILE COURT INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/F
Students gain practical experience and insight into the juvenile justice system through placement with a Polk County juvenile court judge doing research, observing hearings, drafting memos and sometimes decisions, and working on model court or court improvement projects when possible.

632. JUVENILE LAW APPELLATE INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/F
Students gain practical experience and insight into the juvenile justice system through placement in the Attorney General's office on appeals from placement on the Child Abuse Registry and Termination of Parental Rights. Students research and write briefs and represent the state in prehearing conferences and administrative hearings.

620. JUVENILE LAW INTERNSHIP. 1-3 CR/F
Students gain practical experience and insight into the juvenile justice system through placement in the Polk County attorney's office prosecuting juvenile delinquency and child abuse and neglect cases. Prerequisites: Children and the Law (LAW 280) and Trial Advocacy (LAW 050).

 
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