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Recreational Activities and Services

Finding ways to relax and unwind is important to your overall well-being as a Drake Law Student. 

Drake University Bell Center and Knapp Center

Located a block away from the Law School, the Drake University Bell Center and Knapp Center offer complete recreational facilities including an indoor track, basketball courts, racketball courts, swimming pool, fitness studio, free weights, and cardiovascular equipment. The facliites are open to all Drake students. Please note that access to some features is limited or restricted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Group exercise classes are currently being offered in a virtual format. Visit https://www.drake.edu/recservices/ for details.

The Honorable Colin J. Witt Victory Running & Walking Club

The Honorable Colin J. Witt Victory Running & Walking Club meets Thursdays at 4:30 p.m. during the Fall and Spring Semesters. Participants meet at the main entrance of Cartwright Hall. All levels of experience are welcome!

*We are taking a break in Fall 2020 but look forward to getting back together safely in Spring 2021. 

Questions about the "Victory Club" can be directed to Katie Overberg, Career Development Office, 515-271-2982 or kathryn.overberg@drake.edu.


The Honorable Colin J. Witt Victory Running & Walking Club  ("Victory Club") honors a friend and colleague in the Des Moines legal community and welcomes law students, faculty, staff, and community members of all abilities to come together for fitness and a break from our work and school schedules.

Outstanding.” Judge Witt’s reaction when he learned of the inception of Drake Law School’s inaugural running club in 2019: “Just got a cool message about a running program you are doing with Drake Law students. That is outstanding. Thanks for being a leader in this area.” Judge Witt, a long-time runner who was in remission at the time from non-Hodgkin’s’ lymphoma, hoped to join the group in 2020 but sadly passed away in February of that year. Judge Witt was a leader in many ways as a juvenile court judge, but notably as a mentor to many Drake Law students.

Given his positivity, his deep connection with Drake Law students, and his love of running and outdoor activity, the original running club wanted to recognize and honor his legacy. Through the wonderful words of Judge Witt’s wife and son, it was renamed in 2020 as the Honorable Colin J. Witt Victory Running & Walking Club, or the Victory Club for short.

Words from Judge Witt’s family:

Colin loved to run and be outdoors bicycling and being free. He found it to be a true solace and refuge from the difficult and tragic things he saw kids suffer through and also a time where he could think through problems/rulings, meditate, pray and also be in community with friends & family. He also loved the challenge of pushing himself well outside of what was comfortable. He always said he wasn’t the fastest guy out there, but he’d be the one outlasting anyone. He loved the discipline of running and learning to endure through the suffering. It made reaching those goals all the sweeter and continued to push him to go farther. He was always challenging himself to be better than the day before and especially if was told he couldn’t or shouldn’t, he’d always find a way. Certainly these lessons helped him in his fight against cancer and enduring through many of his treatments physically and especially mentally. He was never about accolades or medals and he loved helping others to run their first 5K or marathon or set a goal and accomplish it. He celebrated sometimes more than they did.

I know that Colin would have loved to have this kind of outlet going through law school. He ran prior to law school and then it got away from him. But the peace and joy he found in doing so and the discipline and lessons he learned through returning helped him be his best as a human being, a judge, a friend, a son, a dad and husband.

Colin loved mentoring young people and seeing students’ passion for the law and especially the honor and opportunity to serve and bring justice to those who didn’t have a voice. He sought to make the system accessible and was committed to treating each and every person who came before him with kindness, dignity and respect. There is great hope in the next generation and we desperately need them for such sacred work.

 
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